Why I Haven’t Given Up on the Bible

Jacob Wrestles with the Angel, by Rembrandt

When conversation on this blog turn to issues of sexuality, as it did this week with Brian McLaren’s View on Homosexuality, there are always some commenters who admit that their Christian faith has broken free of the Bible. For example, R. Jay comments,

I’m a Christian for whom the Bible is not my foundation, not my law code, not my ladder, not my pedestal. I love it dearly, but I don’t need it to know God, and I don’t need it to understand how to love my neighbor fully.

In the absence of the Bible, there is still God. And to know God does not require the Bible. Devotion to it has become the most insidious of all barriers.

Honestly, I understand how some people come to this conclusion. The Bible is a primitive book, coming out of a primitive time. Even the most staunch conservatives should be able to admit that. It is reflective of a different world than the world in which we live. That doesn’t necessarily mean it’s not applicable to our lives and our time, but that much hermeneutical work needs to be done to understand what it means for us today.

In Brian’s own evolution of how he understand human sexuality, he has not abandoned the Bible,

In this process, I did not reject the Bible. In fact, my love and reverence for the Bible increased when I became more aware of the hermeneutical assumptions on which many now-discredited traditional interpretations were based and defended. I was able to distinguish “what the Bible says” from “what this school of interpretation says the Bible says,” and that helped me in many ways.

Yesterday, Rachel Held Evans proclaimed her love for the Bible. What she really did was talk about how she loves the Bible, using a metaphor that I’ve often used in conversations about the Bible with my friends Nadia Bolz-Weber and Lauren Winner. Here’s Rachel’s metaphor:

It is said that after Jacob wrestled with God, he walked with a limp.

So it has been with the Bible and me.

I have wrestled with the Bible, and it has left me with a limp.

I feel the same kind of relationship with the Bible. I wrestle with it. Sometimes I limp away from the struggle, sometimes the Bible limps away.

I’ve met lots and lots of Christians over the past few years who have forsaken the Bible; their faith is no longer tethered to that text. I get that. I understand the allure of that kind of Christianity.

But I haven’t given up on the Bible because I think that Christianity without the Bible is uninteresting. To put it in the positive, the Bible keeps Christianity interesting. The fact that we’re anchored to this difficult, challenging, primitive, complex, and over-interpreted text makes the Christian faith a challenge. Unmoored from the Bible, Christianity floats into the ether of wispy vapors and feel-goodisms.

I’m not saying that you’re not a Christian if you’ve abandoned the Bible. Constitutive of Christianity is faith in Jesus, not commitment to the Bible — simply the early church confession, “Jesus is Lord!” suffices for faith. I’m saying that for me, Christianity without the Bible seems uninteresting and barely worth the effort.

  • http://www.ststephenslondon.com keith nethery

    I too walk away with a limp after a good tussle with Scripture. But it is in the tussle that I learn. If I have to accept a static interpretation that gives me a take it or leave it choice, there are times I would vote for leaving. But then I get into a passage in sermon prep, or just reading, and I find something that I haven’t noticed before, and it launches me into a whole new thought process. My mantra is that a good sermon is one that answers the question you began with, by giving you five more questions that will continue to grow your faith. It would seem this applies also to the way I understand Scripture. It is in the seeking of meaning that I draw closer to God in faith. The seeking, the tussling if you will, is what keeps it fresh and opens endless possibilities to draw into that relationship. So, I won’t be walking away anytime soon.

  • Craig

    For what it’s worth, Tony, I’d probably still find you interesting if you tossed the Bible.

  • http://videoaudiodisco.blogspot.com JMW

    Why I wrestle with the Bible but won’t give it up: because narrative provides the context for all meaning and without the Bible there is no narrative within which the Christ Event makes ANY sense. I honestly cannot understand how people continue to comprehend and follow Jesus without the narrative of scripture.

  • http://www.pats-dublin.org Stephen Smith

    It is a dialogue that keeps us honest. We wrestle with the text and our tradition, with God, with culture, and with our own experience. To remove any one piece would give us an incomplete picture.

    • http://robopa.blogspot.com Rob

      For me, there is a difference between removing it versus not allowing it to be the adjudicating voice amongst those other things you mention. I have chosen the latter.

  • Brian P.

    Tony, I wonder how much the comment, “Unmoored from the Bible, Christianity floats into the ether of wispy vapors and feel-goodisms” reveals your deeper, inner fears.

    You could have guessed or projected or prophesied or warned a good many things about what happens after Post Bible. I find it interesting that of all the things you could pick, this is what you went for.

  • http://drgtjustwondering.blogspot.com Diana Trautwein

    I loved RHE’s take on this topic and I thank you for this thoughtful response to it.

  • http://www.rjaypearson.com R. Jay Pearson

    I’ve not given up on the Bible either, Tony. In fact, my love for it today is immensely deeper than at any other time in my life. And I grew up as a strictly conservative Bible literalist, believing it to be the word of God, without error, and the only rule of faith for Christians (and for everyone, actually).

    I also wrestled with the Bible. Like you. Like Rachel Held Evans. For years I wrestled. And like the both of you, I have the bruises and limps to show for it.

    Until it occurred to me (and not that long ago) that to wrestle with the Bible is not the same as wrestling with God. And so I wrestled with God. And it was after that match — where it is actually in the surrender that God declares you the winner — that I discovered I don’t need to wrestle with the Bible.

    My own experience concluded that the Bible can be a beloved companion without being a figure of authority. I walk with it, but not behind it. It informs my faith, but does not define or control it. I treasure it without idolizing it.

    The relationship is now well balanced, and in that balance my Christian faith is far more “interesting” and “worth it” than I could ever have imagined. It is not “boring,” but is now intensely purposeful and compelling.

    My Christian faith is enriched by the Bible. And forever will be. But only because I have freed the Bible from the cage I had been trained to set for it, and in doing so I too become free.

    And so when I respond to Bible literalists with statements such as …. “to know God does not require the Bible. Devotion to it has become the most insidious of all barriers,” …. I am not criticizing the Bible, nor am I rejecting. On the contrary, I am criticizing the literalism and rejecting the idolization which unfairly endow the Bible with a power and authority which it does innately possess. When it is fashioned into something it is not, a trap is set where love and grace become constricted.

    I reject the literalism and absolutism that misuse the Bible as a mechanism of control. But as for the Bible itself, you will find no greater Christian champion of its treasured value — its real value — than me.

    • http://www.rjaypearson.com R. Jay Pearson

      Correction in my above comments, in the second to last paragraph: “On the contrary, I am criticizing the literalism and rejecting the idolization which unfairly endow the Bible with a power and authority which it does not innately possess.”

    • jerry lynch

      Thank you, R. Jay, was never quite able to verbalize my view but you expressed it perfectly. And funny, below you edit your comment but I read the “not” without realizing it wasn’t there.

    • Erica Billings

      Thank you for your comment R. Jay. After I read the post, I scrolled down hoping you had replied. I felt like Tony was implying, based off of your quote that he used in his post, that:

      *you no longer find the bible applicable to your life
      *you abandoned/forsook/gave up on the bible
      *your faith is no longer tethered to the bible
      *you no longer find the bible interesting

      However, I did not see you saying any of that. I felt that you were saying quite the opposite, which you have confirmed here. I’m confused as to why your quote was used/understood the way it was.

  • http://whoisrobdavis.wordpress.com Rob Davis

    For me, the dilemma is this: if Jesus is seen as an historical figure, then you must deal with the Bible (because the Bible is the ONLY evidence we have of Jesus even existing). But, if ones understanding of Jesus does not require him to have existed, then the Bible is mostly irrelevant.

    So, it seems to come down to a personal, committed answer to the question: Who do YOU say that he is?

    • http://whoisrobdavis.wordpress.com Rob Davis

      To make this personal, for me, I really don’t care if Jesus ever actually lived at all. My personal commitment to his “way” does not hinge upon his “existence.” I will let the historians duke that out.

      • http://notapastor.wordpress.com notapastor

        Hi Rob, I’m not a historian, but I’m pretty sure there are a lot of nonbiblical texts that record Jesus’ existence. These include the Gnostic Gospels, and I kind of remember (from back in my Sunday school dayz) lessons on the evidence for Jesus from nonbiblical ancient history.

    • Toryshane

      From the standpoint of historicity consider this. Today we know a great deal about a Pharaoh called Akenaten. But from the time of his death until the 19th century his name was completely lost to the world. He was stricken from history. Until he was rediscovered he did not exist. And when he was rediscovered it was only through burial monuments. No eyewitness accounts of him existing survive, not even second or third hand accounts.

      But with Christ, we do have eyewitness accounts and even more second and third hand accounts which while not direct are still very trustworthy. Christ either did really exist or he was made up by a small group of people for some specific purpose. We know that a person, or even a group of people will fabricate lies, even create false identities for themselves of for other people. When this is done it is for financial gain or some more esoteric reason as is the case for some cults. But in the case of Christ, if we are to believe that he was fabricated then we must also believe that a small group of people made him up and this small group of people convinced other people, many of whom risked a great deal just to believe and these people were all willing to die for this fabricated man name Jesus. This is asking a great deal. In addition, it may be easy to convince simple people that a man exists, but not so easy to convince them that he was crucified, which was a matter of public record. In American when hangings were a common method of execution a town would hold the collective memory of a hanging for years, even generations. Much longer that the time Christ went from being a real person to a person who exists only in memory.

      It is possible, but in a court of law Jesus would easily be ruled to exist by virtue of the people who believe him to exist and who themselves lived within a single generation of his life.

      You can even try this out on your own. Invent a person who wants others to change their fundamental world view. A person who at least lets them think that he is a divine being made incarnate. Then have this person lay claim to a prophesy and then let his say that he has the ability to cheat death and raise the dead and cure sickness. Then after only a short time let him be killed off in the most humiliating and cruel way possible while some of the people who helped you to fabricate this person also die for the lie. Now see how many people pay attention to you? How long will this fabricate being gather followers?

      Sometimes belief in existence is sufficient proof of existence.

  • Pax

    Tony,

    What is it about the Bible that makes it important? Most traditions within Christianity view scripture as the Word of God. Setting aside the question of figuring out what it means (obviously interpretations diverge), do you share that view? Is that which is affirmed by scripture affirmed by the Holy Spirit (again, setting aside the fact that we may not know the correct interpretation)?

    Or, is there something else important about it? E.g. It’s a historical document that, while flawed, gives us the best info available on Jesus and the early Church.

    • Toryshane

      Do you mind if I interject a personal thought?

      What makes the Declaration of Independence so important to Americans? We no longer have a King to deal with and that Document was written specifically as a letter between a people and their King. The Constitution is the law of the land making the Declaration of Independence useless as a legal document. We dont argue before the Supreme Court the value of the Declaration . And while we often speak of the importance of Liberty we do so as an idea that is already foundational to America. And yet that document is one that we still cling to. If Washington DC were on fire and only one document could be saved I would wager most Americans would pick the Declaration over the Constitution. Why? Because even though it lacks legal authority and spoke to one very specific time and place that no longer exists it was the document that gave us a voice, that set us apart from other people. When other nations fight to shrug off tyranny they invoke the American Declaration of Independence long before they sit down to argue over tehir own version of a Constitution.

      So it is with the Bible. A Christian can get all the biblical facts he needs from any one of the millions of bible commentaries or bible based self help books that exist. But Christians still reach first and foremost for the bible because it is the book that gave them a language, that set us apart. Church doctrine influence who you pray or when you go to church or if you follow saints or not but the bible informs who we are collectively and individually.

  • http://www.ecumenicalchristianperspective.blogspot.com John R King

    Oh, the Bible has quite a few problems. But for me, it remains the foundation of our identity as Christians. Also, is records the testimony of those who have experienced God and their conclusions from those experiences. Those testimonies act as prompt for my own experiences of God and, while not as an authority, but as a sounding board to compare my conclusions about my experience with God with the conclusions of those who have preceeded me.

    • http://notapastor.wordpress.com notapastor

      Hi John, If I’m reading you right, I agree that a great way to describe the Bible is as an early historical record of our faith tradition.

      Just curious, what do you find problematic? I ask that because, in seeing the Bible as a history book, we open ourselves up to the understanding that history is written from a point-of-view, which is often that of those in power. So the Bible (in canonization, translation and interpretation) has naturally over time been slanted towards a European male POV.

  • Craig

    The form of Tony’s reasoning: I don’t want to give up Christianity; Christianity without the Bible floats into the ether of wispy vapors and feel-goodisms; therefore I can’t give up the Bible.

    In Tony’s view, then, there is something within Christianity that is both importantly valuable and whose value depends upon a biblical foundation. Can we specify what that something is? If we cannot, then are we so sure that it’s better than wispy vapors and feel-goodism? If we can specify what the something is, maybe we’ll find that it can be unmoored from the Bible after all.

  • Nick

    I think that rejecting the authority of Bible introduces more problems than accepting it. For those who have walked away from the Bible, how do you discern what God might be saying to you? (Not intended as flamebait — an honest question) In my experience, I have the strongest sense of God’s intent and communication both by reading the Bible and in my daily life. The Bible actually validates what I’m thinking. I understand Jesus better because I’m reading his words (Yes, though the lens of the gospel writers). I understand better how complex Jesus is by reading the Bible and how the gospel is not just a love message to God’s creation. It’s far deeper than that and the Bible contributes heavily to getting understanding who God is, both beyond and in collaboration with your experiences.

    But if you walk away from the Bible, how do you treat other faiths/traditions that communicate a very different message? For example, why do you consider yourself a Christian, and not a Mormon? (again, not intended as flamebait) If you don’t consider yourself a Mormon, why not? Mormonism and Christianity have very different understandings of God, yet both claim Jesus as their savior. The texts and the traditions are the main distinguishers.

    Tony, with your seminary degree and life experiences, why do you identify yourself as a Christian and not a Mormon?

    • Nick

      Note: the Bible doesn’t always validate what I’m thinking. I opened myself up for a punch in the gut there.

      • Toryshane

        A punch in the gut or a hard fought limp?

    • http://notapastor.wordpress.com notapastor

      Hi Nick. This is in no way foolproof, but I’d say we have to investigate our own conscience. To try to cut through our personal biases and see the world through the bias of love (sounds cheesy, but I’m not trying to be!). Even biblically, I think this approach holds water. Weren’t Adam and Even removed from paradise because they ate from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. From that perspective, we paid a high price to have the ability to discern for ourselves.

  • http://notapastor.wordpress.com notapastor

    I think it’s great that we have the Bible for many reasons. One that stands out here is that it’s a place where we all can meet. It’s a collection of common knowledge that we use to work out our thoughts and beliefs collectively. It’s Christianity’s history book, as Rob Davis alluded to earlier. And one version of Christianity is that we are the Ultimate Book of the Month Club, where every month it’s the same book and there are 2 billion members.

  • Chris

    Great post. I would agree that faith in Jesus is constitutive of Christianity. My question is how one has faith in Jesus apart from Jesus’ identity and description in Scripture? Is that a question that makes any sense as worthy of an answer?

  • Evelyn

    “much hermeneutical work needs to be done to understand what it means for us today.”

    Here’s my hermeneutic: The bible is indicative of the way that God speaks to us. He doesn’t give us the answers, he presents us with situations that are more questions than they are commands. It’s like he’s always asking us what kind of a person we want to be and what kind of a world we want to live in. Situations in the bible are presented over and over again in which the actors react in the wrong way to situations and their relationship between God and humanity is changed for the worse. For example, if Abraham had not thought that God wanted him to sacrifice Isaac, if Jacob had not tried to wrestle with the angel but had surrendered as R. Jay suggests, if Moses and Aaron had not colluded with Yahweh to make the Egyptians suffer from plagues. What if Noah had decided he wasn’t so special after all and told God that he had faith in humanity and instead of building an ark he told everyone about the flood that God was planning. Everyone always assumes that the way the characters respond to hearing from God in the bible is the correct way to respond. It isn’t.

    “I have wrestled with the Bible, and it has left me with a limp.”

    That’s prone to happen when you wrestle with things.

    “Sometimes I limp away from the struggle, sometimes the Bible limps away.”

    The Bible never limps away. It will always come around and show you something about yourself and about humanity.

    “The fact that we’re anchored to this difficult, challenging, primitive, complex, and over-interpreted text makes the Christian faith a challenge. Unmoored from the Bible, Christianity floats into the ether of wispy vapors and feel-goodisms.”

    Isn’t life difficult enough without challenging yourself by going to church? It’s like some kind of manufactured melodramatic lifestyle built on a 2000-year old text. God can’t guide you properly if you are constantly trying to call him up and do battle. The real battles are fought within ourselves on the ground amongst everyone we meet, not in some preconceived (false) notion of what society, God, and human are but in the ACTUALITY of what society, God, and human are. It is sometimes difficult to maintain a positive attitude during this actual battling so, when I was attending church, the thing I liked about it was that it reinforced a positive attitude. The service doesn’t have to be wispy but it helps when proper faith is reaffirmed. I wasn’t going to church to pick a fight (although that is what is seems to have wound up being).

    “Constitutive of Christianity is faith in Jesus, not commitment to the Bible — simply the early church confession, “Jesus is Lord!” suffices for faith.”

    I don’t have “faith” in Jesus. I was able to get baptized and accept Jesus as my savior on the basis that savior means “friend” not “lord”. I don’t accept that Jesus stands between me and God nor do I think that I am like Jesus or on par with Jesus. I am what I am and God meets me where I am. Unfortunately, I think that being “Christian” is defined by those who call themselves Christian so under most definitions, I am not Christian.

  • Brad C

    A post modern/pragmatist hermeneutic
    In the emerging post modern context – perhaps theologians/thought leaders should develop a new interpretive approach to the Bible – as clearly some of the hermeneutics handed to us don’t work anymore. If the post modern/pragmatist idea – that “truth” is merely an agreement continues to develop and be embraced perhaps we should explore this method as a new hermeneutical approach.
    Pragmatist (for the most part) see truth as an agreement (that works) between limited creatures using limited language and concepts, etc. – so in no way do people ever hold “absolute truth”, “universals” or “certainty” just agreements that work. In addition, if we consider language as a human construct and the Bible as a collection of limited creatures using limited constructs to share their agreements about an unlimited God – it changes how we view and approach the Bible.
    Perhaps the purpose of the church is truth – to develop agreements that work in our cultural context; agreements that are God honoring (from our limited understanding of God), considering the historical community (the Bible and teachings) and the context of our current community – agreements that shape our culture and act as truth today.
    Perhaps the Bible is not to blame, rather the hermeneutic used to interpret it and now is the time to develop a new hermeneutic – that works.

    • Brad C

      FYI – good book, easy read

      Whose Community? Which Interpretation?: Philosophical Hermeneutics for the Church by Merold Westphal

  • Keith Rowley

    My dad refers to the Bible as the best tool we have to learn about God and grow in our relationship with God. I like this view because it says there are other tools out there and the Bible is not an absolutely necessary tool just the best tool for the job. This puts the bible in its proper place as not being something we worship but something we use.

  • Kien

    Hi Tony. Thanks for your blog. Particularly like the series on hard questions for Christianity. I am surprised people with liberal views feel they have to give up in the bible. Perhaps why they are really giving up on is a literalistic, lawyer like way of reading the bible. To me, the bible is a compilation of a range of different types of literary material which the Christian community shares. It is a literary canon, like Shakespeare to the British or like Homer to the Greeks or like The
    Dream of the Red Chamber to the Chinese. It is also a wonderful “time machine” that lets me engage with the known or unknown authors of the biblical material that have sought to wrestle with deep questions about suffering, evil, hope, and historical events.

  • Mary

    Hi Tony… thanks for this… I haven’t given up on it either. I’ve said here before the Bible is not God… though some seem to think it is, or at the very least an idol like one of your wise readers commented recently. It was not written BY God but about Him/Her/It and as such can never been “inerrant”, etc. because that was never its purpose. God as I understand Him, would never even consider hovering over someone whispering the exact words to the writer’s ear or hold court during the establishment of the Church Canon because God has far more faith in his creations and their ability to know HIm than we do.
    What I have found embedded in the pages, of late, is an undercurrent that is oft suppressed by the fundamentalist vein, virtually ignored by those that focus on the many bits and pieces that show God and his followers in a negative light; and is a steady & persistent path to a way of wisdom and of being that culminates in Jesus’ ministry. It continues despite the flaws and trespasses of His followers.
    I love Brian McLaren’s (paraphrased) suggestion to read the Bible through the lens of Christ. If we chose to follow Jesus we begin to see God of Old, afresh. If we consider anything he said to be valid then it changes our picture (ideas about the nature) of God forever and SHOULD change how WE show up as a Christian as well.
    There is a lot left to learn from this Book but the words are also written on your heart.

  • Casey

    Tony,

    Is there a link to an exegetical paper or article you have written somewhere on your site?

    I’d be curious to investigate, from your exegetical perspective, what you believe to be the weakness/deficiency of any given text (assuming that a “limping Bible” is a deficient Bible in some sense).

    Thanks!

  • bruce

    There is a more basic problem with the viewpoint that the Bible is the source of knowing God. The critical foundation of Christ is his Church, which has given us the holy canon of Scripture. Without the Church that Christ founded, one can easily become lost, for without the Church there is no Scripture, without the Church, there is no full understanding of his Word (both incarnate and as passed on in the writings of the Apostles).

  • Toryshane

    If we are unwilling to walk away from a struggle with a limp then we are unwilling to consider entering the struggle fully and without the struggle we are nothing but hollow shells.
    To borrow from the great Chesterton

    Christianity has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult and not tried.

    There is no doubt that the bible is difficult from a perspective of literature, it is doubly difficult from the perspective of a moral guidebook. Each page is a progression into an ever more complex, ever deepening mystery that while giving the right answers does nothing to diminish the questions. Because it is so difficult people all to often try ignore it or they try to reduce it to collections of aphorisms, the feel good religion mentioned in the article. But this also removes the intrinsic call to struggle. How do we reconcile the GOD who smites down whole cities for seemingly minor infractions with the GOD who through his son calls on us to love one another and forgive one another? Is it the same God who played with Abraham’s emotions by forcing him to offer Issac up as a sacrifice only to intervene at the last moment as the GOD who would not intervene on behalf of his own son? And of course the big question why does a just god allow injustice and suffering to dominate the world he created? What could be more difficult than navigating through these questions? It is easier to walk away, to leave it untried.

    For me I draw an inspiration for a historical hero of mine. W.E. B. Dubois once wrote of Abraham Lincoln that he was big enough to be inconsistent. What does this mean? Lincoln could be man who divided the Union so that it might be united. He could uphold slavery while working to abolish it. He could demand that his soldiers go forth and kill in the name of the union and then with sublime decency ask those same soldiers to put away their weapons and embrace their former enemy as fellow citizens. So it is with GOD. It is an easy argument to say that GOD simply transcends all things, including our comprehension of him. And this is true but GOD is also comprehensible within us. We are his creations, but also his reflection. Each human being, and I fully believe this has a soul and that soul is what makes us unique and that uniqueness is what makes us all so very different and at times so hostile to one another because of those differences. If the creation reflects the creator then at least on some level we must also reflect the inconsistent nature of the divine. In other words; If GOD is real then he must be big enough to be inconsistent. And if we find him to be consistent then he must certainly small.

  • Dan England

    If you do not believe Jesus has been raised from the dead then why do you read the bible? A person has to read the bible with their faith. To read the bible correctly means you want to know Jesus more and more. And to know him more and more is to want to love others how He loves us. Sometimes love is tough which is why so many people do not like the Apostle Paul. Just as Jesus was a revealing of his Father to the Jews, the Apostle Paul is revealing Jesus to the gentiles. The problem today is too many do not believe Jesus has risen from the dead, and or, too many only read the bible and do not study it and they have fallen into error.

  • Stuart

    The Bible is God’s special revelation and our guide to being redeemed by Christ through his bodily death and resurrection. I don’t see how you can be a Christian without believing in the inherency and infallibility of the Bible. Certainly, the only way for salvation is through faith in Christ but that faith and way to redemption is given to us in the Bible. If you don’t believe then where’s the foundation of your faith? If you create an image of God that makes you comfortable and picking and choosing what you want to believe isn’t that just an idol of your heart? I think the biggest issue people have with the bible are the absolutes, and those absolutes make people uncomfortable. We should be uncomfortable with the fact we are sinners but find peace through the good news of the Gospel!

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