The Wisest of Words from Rachel

The truth is, that dude whose blog posts totally rub you the wrong way may be the best person in the world with which to watch a football game or talk theology over beer. That acquaintance on Facebook whose pictures make her life seem perfect may struggle with self-doubt, depression, and fear. That stuffy Calvinist you love to hate may melt into a goofy, delightful playmate when he’s tickling his kids on the living room floor. The feminist you always imagine shouting other people down may have an unbelievably tender heart.  The pastor you think is always wrong probably gets a few things right. And the pastor you think is always right definitely gets some stuff wrong.

via You don’t hate me. You hate my brand..

  • mecyssne

    Tony, I read that post at RHE’s blog, and it just brought to my mind some of the discomfort I felt when I read a post where you referred to your brand some months back. When I read it, I thought, “I wonder if there are things that Tony wants to say that he doesn’t for the sake of the brand he’s trying to create. I wonder if the tone he takes–and maybe even the positions he takes–are really him or an intentional branding decision in response to the need for pageviews.” Maybe that’s unfair–maybe you’re not trying to create a brand at all, maybe branding is just an unavoidable part of blogging.

    Anyway, I felt a mixture of frustration and sympathy when I read RHE’s post–sympathy because it must be difficult to feel like people are upset with you who don’t even know you, but frustration because as a reader it’s hard for me to sort out what’s your brand and what’s you, especially when as in your case and RHE’s case, your brand relies a lot on authenticity.

    PS–not sure how I accidentally put up a different user name than usual for me, but I always mean to use my real name, so this is Michael Jordan.

  • Tim

    I agree. Although unfortunately in the case of Mark Driscoll, he IS by-and-large his “brand”.


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