Various Goodnesses

At Her•Menuetics, Laura Turner encourages her fellow evangelicals to embrace the F-Wordfeminism:

The church needs feminism because at its core, feminism affirms to us what our faith teaches us about male and female in God’s Kingdom and what Jesus himself preached throughout the New Testament.

The Seattle School of Theology and Psychology announces that John Franke will be giving the inaugural Stanley Grenz Lectures a month from now:

The Stanley Grenz Lecture Series is offered by The Seattle School of Theology and Psychology in honor of former Professor Stanley Grenz, a prolific Christian scholar with a pastoral heart and deep intellectual presence. Stan engaged the challenging theological questions of his generation with a profound sensitivity to the complexities of a Christian community embedded within a cultural context. In honor of him, this series is designed to invite scholarly theological discourse into the public forum, as an expression of Christian faith and service.

Third Way Magazine has a great interview with my theological muse, Jürgen Moltmann (HT: Scott Paeth):

 You emphasise in your autobiography that you asked not ‘Why does God allow this to happen?’ but ‘My God, where are you?’ What is the distinction?
Well, the first question is asking for an explanation of the evil situation you are in; the second question asks how to get out of it. I don’t want it explained why I am in this misery, I want to be liberated from it, and therefore I cry to God: ‘Where are you? Save me!’
If you as a pastor visit a dying person and he asks you why he is dying and you ex­plain his situation, he will have you thrown out of the room. The question of theo­dicy is, to my mind, one asked mostly by the onlookers, not by those who are in a hopeless situation.

Does the question of theodicy not interest you?
No, it is only asking why there is evil if God is almighty and good. It doesn’t ask about God’s other attributes – for example, love, compassion – only power and goodness. And it is a very speculative question, a question ab­out the God of Plato and Aristotle. It is not a biblical question, or a personal question.


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