Because It’s OK for Catholics to Laugh II

I saw Stephen Colbert’s latest interview with Richard Dawkins last night and concluded that Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups is another reason YIM Catholic.

Apologies for the mandatory ad that precedes the five-minute video clip. The ad changes. Mine was Jack Daniels. To be clear: Jack Daniels is not one of the reasons YIM Catholic.

Pour yourself a Coke and give the link a click.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17350861069153040567 Kelly

    "From God…are you deaf?" Probably my favorite line in this whole interview.

  • cathyf

    Ah, maybe Jack Daniels is not a reason to be Catholic, but Basil Hayden should be. If you look at the Old Grandad Whiskey bottle, you'll see a picture of Basil Hayden. According to the iconic Benedict J Webb's 1886 A Centenary of Cathlicity in Kentucky:"In the year 1789, “a league” of sixty families was formed in Maryland — all Catholics, and mostly residents of St. Mary’s county — each one of whom was pledged to emigrate to Kentucky within a specified time. Their purpose was to settle together, as well for mutual protection against the Indians, as with the view of securing to themselves, with the least possible delay, the advantages of a pastorate and a church. They were not all to emigrate at once, but as circumstances permitted. The tradition of this league is sufficiently general among old people, as well in Maryland as in Kentucky, to give to it certainty.* Of the sixty families subscribing to the compact, twenty five left Maryland early-in 1785, and reached Kentucky before the end of spring of the same year…""…The names borne by these twenty-five families are not now all certainly known; but the principal among them was Basil Hayden whose bond for his land, signed at Baltimore in 1785, is of record in the Nelson county clerk’s office."These Maryland Catholic families were descendants of English Catholics who had settled there starting with the arrival of the Ark & Dove in 1634. Maryland was not hugely tolerant of Catholics. It was off and on illegal for the Church to own property, so whenever the Calverts passed such a law my ancestor Thomas Matthews would take ownership of all of the Jesuits' property in the state, then later when the laws were eased he would transfer it back. (The Maryland colony was a mission of the London Province of the Jesuits until the American Revolution.) After about 1700 the harassment increased. It was against the law for Mass to be held in any public building, so my ancestors built houses with really big living rooms. :-) In order to hold public office or serve in the militia, a man was required to take an oath swearing that he did not believe in transubstantiation. Since Catholics obviously could not serve in the militia, they were taxed at a double rate. If a son converted from Catholicism, he could demand his share of his inheritance immediately — a big financial inducement. Yet the families largely remained faithful, and when they married outside the church they got non-Catholic spouses to convert more often than the other way around.So, anyway, when my ancestors decamped to Kentucky, they were the descendants of six or so generations that had been ministered to by the English Jesuits under fairly adverse circumstances. The amusing story is that when they got to Kentucky a lot of the priests that they got were refugees from the French Revolution, and more or less Jansenists. The Kentucky Catholics were brewers of whiskey, and big dancers (and, *gasp* women danced with men!) The French Jansenists were aghast at this scandalous behavior!But 150 years of harassment and persecution, and 150 years of the Jesuits preaching to them that God loved them and had created them, in love, to worship and love Him, had pretty well inoculated these Catholics to the outraged sputterings of the froggy Jansenists! They continued to distill (and drink) whiskey, and to dance, and to be faithful to the religion of their ancestors.

  • crazylikeknoxes

    cathyf:Fascinating. Any bourbon distillers among these Kentucky Catholics?

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/01829596326992504494 Christopher

    I am partial to Peanut Butter Cups. But alas, I cannot watch that video. Pray tell, what is the connection between Peanut Butter Cups and Richard Dawkins. Please don't tell me I have to give them up now.

  • cathyf

    Old Grandad is the whiskey which bear's Basil's picture. As you can read on the wikipedia page for Basil Hayden's, that's the small-batch bourbon that is produced by Jim Beam Industries and is supposed to be very close to Basil's original recipe.

  • Webster Bull

    Answer to Christopher–Colbert says, mid-interview: God does exist.Dawkins: You ask me for evidence for evolution. Where's the evidence for God?Colbert (not missing a beat): Reese's Peanut Butter Cups. OK? Explain that away. That just naturally happened, that my peanut butter got in your chocolate?! No, that can't happen. Someone had to design those peanut butter cups, correct?Dawkins: Correct.Colbert: So design exists in the universe. . . .

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13498022170410597255 Gen

    I think that, perhaps, while Colbert's show is generally more "left-leaning," his interviews are where his Catholic, or at least Christian faith, shows forth in all of its splendor.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17384055883425252489 Michael McDonough

    I missed the show, so thanks for bringing this to our attention.But, speaking of design, Webster, what has become of Dire Straits?

  • Webster Bull

    To Michael, Dire Straits, no matter how I stretch it, is probably not one of the big reasons YIM Catholic, though "Brothers in Arms" is powerful. Ditto Mark Knopfler, post-DS, though "Silvertown Blues" still leaves me baying at the car radio, and "Speedway at Nazareth" might conceivably have Biblical roots. But I think Lourdes, "Chariots of Fire," and even Kate Rusby's "Maid of Llanwellyn" before Dire Straits! WB

  • EPG

    Re Kentucky Catholics — I had no idea Basil Hayden was Catholic. Of course, my personal favorite small batch bourbon, Elijah Craig, is named after a Baptist preacher (who is credited with inventing the stuff).On another note, the early presence of Catholics from Maryland in Kentucky would account for this proto-cathedral in Bardstown (which is a center of the bourbon industry)http://www.stjoechurch.com/

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09192266454479639329 Ismael

    I do not completely disagree with Dawkins ideas. No I am not an atheist :)If evolution can be proven, it should not be rejected. Pope Pius XII, in 'Humani Generis' stated that the theory evolution was not contrary to the Cristian (catholic) faith.What Dawkins proves (or tries to prove and explain at least) is the 'how' but not the 'why'.

    • TimeTraveler

      Two connections I need help on.
      My 8x great grandparents are: William Hardy (b. England), who immigrated to MD and married Elizabeth Hayden of St. Mary’s Co., MD, in about 1675. I guess it’s highly likely this is the same Hayden family discussed here. Can anyone verify or tell me more about them, particularly Elizabeth Hayden?
      Their Hardy descendants lived in MD and then moved to KY en masse with the families discussed here.
      William’s great-great grandson Casper Hardy and Casper’s wife Elizabeth (nee McAtee) Hardy (my 4x great grandparents) moved from MD to KY in the early 1800s. In KY, they founded and ran a distillery together and shipped their “product” to New Orleans on flatboats until 1830 or so. They owned 1771 acres of land on the South Elkhorn Creek in KY and the land was involved in distilling and shipping. In 1830 or so, they retired and moved with their extended Hardy and McAtee families to MO.
      Does anyone know anything more at all about their distillery, if it had a brand name, anything? This is all I know about it.
      Thank you!


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