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On Nephite Genetics and Ancient Egypt

On Nephite Genetics and Ancient Egypt July 30, 2021

 

Densley et al. aboard a balloon in Egypt
In the “basket” of a hot air balloon above the ancient mortuary temples of Luxor, Egypt, a few years ago. In the center of the photograph is Steve Densley, the executive vice president of the Interpreter Foundation. About ten minutes later, the mustachioed individual in the photo’s lower left was, as it were, “voted off the island” and thrown overboard in order to improve the neighborhood.

 

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As I say, I’ve fallen a bit behind on my blogging.  The fourth installment of Kyler Rasmussen’s series of Bayesian essays appeared on the website of the Interpreter Foundation on Wednesday:

 

“Estimating the Evidence Episode 4: On Nephite Genetics”

 

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“Announcing the Interpreter Foundation Ultimate Egypt Tour Lecture Series”

The Interpreter Foundation is pleased to announce a new Lecture series in anticipation of The Interpreter Foundation Ultimate Egypt Tour.

The first lecture will be held as part of the 2021 FAIR Conference at 7 PM on August 5, at the Experience Event Center, 1440 North Moon River Drive, Provo, UT. This first lecture is FREE, but since space is limited, seating priority will be given to FAIR Conference attendees and those already booked on the The Interpreter Foundation Ultimate Egypt Tour.

Subsequent lectures will be presented live to those who are booked on the Egypt tour at the Jordan Event Center which is located at 9112 South Redwood Road in West Jordan (right behind the Cruise Lady office) and will begin at 7 pm. Others will be able to view the lectures at a later time on The Interpreter Foundation website.

If you are not already booked on the Ultimate Egypt—Interpreter Foundation Tour, call Cruise Lady today at 801-453-9444.

You can register for the complete 2021 FAIR Conference here.

Here are the lectures for which we’ve arranged, with the dates remaining to be determined after the first in the series:

August 5 (Thursday, 7 PM) Stephen Smoot: An Egyptian Context for the Book of Abraham

(Presented as part of the 2021 FAIR Conference, held at 1440 North Moon River Drive, Provo, UT. This lecture is free to all, but seating priority will be given to FAIR Conference attendees and members of the Ultimate Egypt—Interpreter Foundation Tour.  Subsequent lectures will be presented live to those who are booked on the Egypt tour at the Jordan Event Center which is located at 9112 South Redwood Road in West Jordan (right behind the Cruise Lady office) and will begin at 7 pm. Others will be able to view the lectures at a later time on The Interpreter Foundation website.Subsequent lectures will be presented live to those who are booked on the Egypt tour at the Jordan Event Center which is located at 9112 South Redwood Road in West Jordan (right behind the Cruise Lady office) and will begin at 7 pm. Others will be able to view the lectures at a later time on The Interpreter Foundation website.)

John Thompson: Symbols of the Egyptian Priesthood in the Tombs of Ancient Egypt

John Gee: The Gospel and the Egyptians

Steve Densley: Pharaohs, Temples and Tombs: A Guided Tour Through Ancient Egypt

Kerry Muhlestein: Ancient Egypt’s Temples, and Parallels

Daniel Peterson: What You Need to Know About Egypt’s Most Recent Two Thousand Years

 

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Incidentally, I received a note the other day from Scott Gordon, the president of FAIR, indicating that they had been granted fifty more seats at the venue where next week’s annual FAIR conference will be held.  I don’t know whether those fifty extra seats are still available, but I hope that any out there who have been thinking about attending will consider finding out.  For me, the annual FAIR conference is always one of the highlights of the year.

 

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Here are two more links to a prior issue of Interpreter: A Journal of Latter-day Saint Faith and Scholarship.  These two are closely interrelated, and I think that some will find them enjoyable:

 

Allen Wyatt, “An Approach to History”

Abstract: When researching and evaluating historical information, it is easy to come across things that may lead to a crisis of faith. Some of those crises may lead individuals to leave the Church and actively proselytize against it. It is much better when dealing with historical issues to approach them from a standpoint of charity, treating historical figures as we would like to be treated.

 

Davis Bitton, “I Don’t Have a Testimony of the History of the Church”

Abstract: In this masterful presentation, accomplished historian Davis Bitton addresses the role of history and belief. Testimonies, he asserts, are born of belief and spiritual witnesses, not from historical events. It is quite possible to know all about Church history and still remain a believing member.

[Editor’s Note: This essay was presented at the 2004 FAIR Conference.1 In preparation for publication it has been lightly copy edited and some citations and annotations added.]

 

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My wife and I went up to South Salt Lake this afternoon, where we met Bret Eborn and his wife.  They transferred several boxes to us, containing quite a few copies of the new Hugh Nibley Observed book.  It’s a beautiful thing.  I hope that you’ll all buy a copy and read it.

 

After we had the Nibley volumes, we went to Benchmark Books, where, according to plan, we met with Jann Cahoon Campbell (who worked at the Foundation for Ancient Research and Mormon Studies back in its golden age and who has been an Interpreter Foundation volunteer for a number of years), as well as her husband, Ryan, and Robert Boylan.  (I was also pleased to run into Mark Johnson, who volunteers for Interpreter and regularly participates in the Interpreter Radio Show) and Curt Bench (the proprietor of Benchmark Books).

 

I had never actually met Robert Boylan before, although I’ve long been aware of his remarkable blog.  I cannot spend more than three minutes in any bookstore of even minimal quality without finding something that I want.  So, naturally, I bought something.  (Benchmark Books far exceeds “minimum quality.”)

 

Finally, we had dinner with the Campbells and Robert Boylan at The Afghan Kitchen, which is across the street and no more than half a block from Benchmark Books.  I recommend it very highly.  This was our first time there.  The food was very good, and I really want to see restaurants like this flourish and thrive in my adopted home state.

 

 


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