8 Ways To Invoke Solstice Season Magick

8 Ways To Invoke Solstice Season Magick December 13, 2019

The Solstice season is ripe with Magick. I personally find that the most Magickal time of the year begins just before Samhain and continues through the New Year. I’ve included a few ways below to invite even more Magick into this special time of year.

1.) Capture the first light on Solstice morning.

This can be done by bringing a crystal out on solstice morning, at dawn and catching the light as soon as you are able. If you can’t get up at dawn (or are far too loathe to do so), setting it on the sill of an eastern-facing window will also do.

This light can be used to “shed light” on a mysterious topic (such as to uncover information being hidden from you), or call attention to an issue in need. Organizers may want to consider bringing the crystal along when working on issues that need more attention. You can also place it on an effigy of the cause. For double the effect, do the same action for the same crystal on the Full Moon closest to the Solstice.

2.) Pay attention to Christmastime dreams.

Even if you don’t celebrate Christmas, a lot of people do. As Dickens very well knew, this was a time when people historically believed ghosts would walk among the living. Keep a dream journal between Solstice and the New Year. Limit the use of intoxicants if they cause you to not remember as many dreams. You may find yourself receiving visions.

3.) New Year Divination.

This is a GREAT time to start forecasting for the new year. Read for yourself (I have a great book on that, if you’re one of those people who think they “can’t read for themselves”), or swap readings with a partner or friend. Make notes of what is coming for you in the coming year, and compare notes in the next year.

Related content: Yule Music That Doesn’t Suck.

4.) Banish the Old Year

Make a note of the New Moon closest to the New Year. Around that time, bless a bucket of water with the intention of pushing away the things that were hurtful or limiting in the previous year, while thanking these things for the lessons they provided. Be sure to do an invocation (perhaps lighting a candle) to invoke the things you’d like to have come into your life.

For a great resource, see Khi Armand’s book, Clearing Spaces. 

5.) Bless Your Vehicle

Don’t just treat your vehicle like something meant to serve you, but treat it like a partner. It gets you where you need to go. Take a moment to lay your hand on the vehicle and thank it for carrying you so much over the past year. Vehicles aren’t only cars–they include bicycles and even walking shoes. If your main method of transportation is public, consider doing a blessing ritual on your bus or subway pass, or offering a quiet prayer of thanks next time you take a ride.

6.) Honor the Ancestors

Too often, Ancestors only get remembered at Samhain. But the December holidays have a lot of resonance for many difference Ancestors. If your Ancestors celebrated Hannukah, Kwanzaa, Christmas, or any other winter-timed holiday, take the time to light a candle in their honor and invite them to join the celebration as honored guests.

7.) Deck Your Altars 

If Deity plays a role in your practice, do some holiday decorating on their altars as well. Even if they’re not typically associated with December holidays, they will appreciate being included. I like to put evergreen boughs on my Brigid altar, as she’s my main deity and the patroness of our home.

For more information on Brigid, I have a book on that, too! 

8.) Write A Letter To Yourself

Time is not linear. They say it moves in a circle. If this is the case, our future selves are out and about at the same time as our present and past selves. Consider writing a letter to your future self, encouraging them to make the changes you want to see in your life in the coming year.

At the same time, have a conversation with your past self–forgiving yourself for the things you regret, and tapping back into the things you had hoped for yourself, then and either letting them go or inviting them to return.

About Courtney Weber
Courtney Weber is a Witch, author, Tarot adviser, and activist. She is the author of "Brigid: History, Mystery, and Magick of the Celtic Goddess," "Tarot for One: The Art of Reading for Yourself", "The Morrigan: Celtic Goddess of Magick and Might," and the forthcoming "Hekate: Goddess of Witches." She is a co-host of That Witch Life podcast. She has been featured in the New York Times, Maxim, Playboy, Huffington Post, Vice, and the Thom Hartmann Show. Visit her online at www.courtneyaweber.com. You can read more about the author here.

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