Theology of the Cross, Power and Language (#2)

Theology of the Cross, Power and Language (#2) January 6, 2009

Carl Trueman in his article Luther’s Theology of the Cross we introduced yesterday, on the “revolutionary implications” of this insight, that God is to be known only in Christ crucified:

Luther is demanding that the entire theological vocabulary be revised in light of the cross. Take for example the word power. When theologians of glory read about divine power in the Bible, or use the term in their own theology, they assume that it is analogous to human power. They suppose that they can arrive at an understanding of divine power by magnifying to an infinite degree the most powerful thing of which they can think. In light of the cross, however, this understanding of divine power is the very opposite of what divine power is all about. Divine power is revealed in the weakness of the cross, for it is in his apparent defeat at the hands of evil powers and corrupt earthly authorities that Jesus shows his divine power in the conquest of death and of all the powers of evil. So when a Christian talks about divine power, or even about church or Christian power, it is to be conceived of in terms of the cross—power hidden in the form of weakness.

For Luther, the same procedure must be applied to other theological terms. For example, God’s wisdom is demonstrated in the foolishness of the cross. Who would have thought up the foolish idea of God taking human flesh in order to die a horrendous death on behalf of sinners who had deliberately defied him, or God making sinners pure by himself becoming sin for them, or God himself raising up a people to newness of life by himself submitting to death? We could go on, looking at such terms as life, blessing, holiness, and righteousness. Every single one must be reconceived in the light of the cross. All are important theological concepts; all are susceptible to human beings casting them in their own image; and all must be recast in the light of the cross.

This can be the key to a new apologetic to postmodernists, who assume that truth is nothing more than a language game that masks the imposition of power. Here is another kind of Word and another kind of Power, one intent not on controlling but on redeeming.

"It actually looks at educational attainment if I recall correctly, which you'll notice (actually YOU ..."

Eugenics & the Baby-Manufacturing Industry
"Unless your mystery study, which I notice you haven't referenced, is much different from the ..."

Eugenics & the Baby-Manufacturing Industry
"Luther was responding to an abuse that was happening at the time. The quote comes ..."

Eugenics & the Baby-Manufacturing Industry
"Jeffrey Toobin is an evangelical?"

Eugenics & the Baby-Manufacturing Industry

Browse Our Archives