Why we have cookouts and don’t work on Vocation Day

Why we have cookouts and don’t work on Vocation Day September 5, 2016

Our efforts to turn Labor Day into a Christian feast commemorating the doctrine of Vocation may be catching on.  I am reading and hearing more and more posts and sermons that are making the connection.

Moving from “labor” to “vocation” helps to explain the central question that always comes up about Labor Day.  If “labor” is so great, why do we celebrate it by not working?

If you think in terms of vocation, you realize that how we make a living is only one facet of our God-given callings.  In addition to the workplace, we also have vocations in the family, in the church, and in the society.  Each of our many vocations has its own “labor.”  And each has its own “neighbors” whom we are to love and serve.

So celebrating Vocation Day by spending time with our families and friends is perfectly appropriate.  What we do in the workplace day after day is, in part, to provide for our families.  They and our friends, as well as the general public, are our “neighbors.”

Loving and serving our neighbors is the purpose of every vocation.  Even Christians do not always realize this fact, so our posts are going to delve into this teaching a little today.  But having a cookout, doing summertime stuff, having a last mini-vacation before the busyness of the Fall–these are good ways to celebrate Vocation Day.

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