Aphrodite

Aphrodite December 1, 2015
Aphrodite, Greek Late Classical or Early Hellenistic Period, about 330–300 B.C. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Bartlett Head of Aphrodite, associated with the style of Praxiteles. (cc)
Aphrodite, Greek Late Classical or Early Hellenistic Period, about 330–300 B.C. Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.
Bartlett Head of Aphrodite, associated with the style of Praxiteles. (cc)

Aprhodite’s nature and deeds are well enough known that they don’t need to be repeated here. This head of Aphrodite, carved between 300 and 300 BCE, is sometimes called the “Bartlett Head.” It was once attached to a complete figure, and likely would have been part of a temple; many Greek sculptures from this era were painted. Now the temple and the rest of the figure are lost, and this isolated head is on display in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. It is worth remembering that when we see religious art in museums, what we are seeing has been removed from its original religious setting and purpose, and put into a completely secular context where it has no purpose except to be gazed at for its presumed artistic beauty.


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