3 Weak Arguments against Contemporary Worship Music

3 Weak Arguments against Contemporary Worship Music July 20, 2016

worship guitar

Bad Argument #1: Old songs are better. This argument usually descends into warm, fuzzy reminiscences of singing in church with Grandma. That’s all fine and good, but it’s not enough. It’s not enough to say “That was my mothers favorite hymn!” or “Those good old songs meant so much!” Some beloved old hymns feature terrible, vapid poetry paired with disjunct, noodly tunes, yet continue to find acceptance because their emotional appeal is so strong. We have made them into idols. Sentimentality is the biggest, shiniest golden calf for the worshiping church.

Reframing this discussion:
-Singing old songs (in addition to new ones) keeps us grounded in the history of our faith and connects us to those who have come before, reminding us that we’re not alone.
-Singing old songs (in addition to new ones) protecting us from the sins of narcissism and chronological snobbery.
-Singing old songs (in addition to new ones) expands our worship vocabulary, and steeps us in the language of our faith.

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