How To Respond To Pope Francis’ “Fundamentalism Is A Sickness”

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By now, I’m sure most of you have seen the following quote from our Holy Father, delivered on his return trip from Africa:

“Fundamentalism is a sickness that exists in all religions. We Catholics have some, not just some, so many, who believe they have the absolute truth and they move forward with calumnies, with defamation and they hurt (people), they hurt. And, I say this because it’s my Church, also us, all of us. It must be combatted. Religious fundamentalism isn’t religious. Why? Because God is lacking. It’s idolatrous, as money is idolatrous. Making politics in the sense of convincing these people who have this tendency is a politics that we religious leaders must make, but fundamentalism that ends up always in tragedy or in crime, in a bad thing comes about in all religions a little bit. “

It’s been blowing up certain quarters of the Catholic Innerwebz, and I thought I’d toss in my two cents.

If his words offend you, then maybe you need to sit down – or better yet, kneel before a tabernacle or in an Adoration chapel – and humbly beg Christ to inflame your charity, to have mercy on your soul, and to increase your wisdom and understanding.

On the other hand, if his words convict you, then maybe you need to sit down – or better yet, kneel before a tabernacle or in an Adoration chapel – and humbly beg Christ to inflame your charity, to have mercy on your soul, and to increase your wisdom and understanding.

Similarly, if his words confuse you, then maybe you need to sit down – or better yet, kneel before a tabernacle or in an Adoration chapel – and humbly beg Christ to inflame your charity, to have mercy on your soul, and to increase your wisdom and understanding.

Conversely, if his words prick your conscience ever so slightly, perhaps uncovering a mere corner of a blind spot, then maybe you need to sit down – or better yet, kneel before a tabernacle or in an Adoration chapel – and humbly beg Christ to inflame your charity, to have mercy on your soul, and to increase your wisdom and understanding.

That’s what I’m gonna do.

Image via Pixabay

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  • James Silk

    The question is “how is it to be combatted?”

    The danger is replacing fundamentalism with liberalism. There are not a few catholics who are concerned our Papa may be teetering towards this error.

    Fundamentalism, ultimately, can only be triumphed when one recognizes that knowledge about God is not the same thing as knowledge of God. Knowledge about God can become an idol otherwise. Dogma is necessary but it must be accepted humbly and looked upon as guide post along the path toward experience of the Unspeakable One that pervades all things. The eastern church call this theoria, while in the west we use the term contemplation.

    Liberalism in the church also fails us, because it leads the faithful away from the hard path towards Union with the God by watering down the revealed truths. No one will make the long difficult trek towards sanctity without a strong conviction of the truths of faith.

    This is last point is why many are concerned about the confusing words of the Pope that seem to undermine ultimate Truths.

    From my own POV it seems there are alot more liberalizers and those without conviction in the church then those with an idolatrous conviction (aka fundamentalist).

    ~j

    • http://frustratedpodcast.com AnonCollie

      So, you used a post about the Holy Father’s comments on the dangers of fundamentalism, to turn right around and defame liberalism. Sounds like you’re dancing close to fundamentalism yourself there.

      • Eric

        Could you please point out specifically where he defamed liberalism? Do you know what defame means?

      • James Silk

        Truthfully, I dance close to both fundamentalism and liberalism, as if walking a straight and narrow tight rope above the two.

  • Sherry

    Amen.

  • http://www.hypothica.com IprayIam

    Great advice. but then..

    the same could given had the pope said “Gooble snoogle bippity boopity zop.”

    Point being, the pope makes a public statement and the best we can say when people react is: “well…. go pray”.

    Certainly “go pray” is always a good idea. And certainly we shouldn’t be living our faith by the whim of the pope’s latest press release. And I really think this advice directs us toward what is most important.

    And yet, I wonder if it’s ok that I’m disappointed that the contents of the pope’s statements are often so difficult to parse that at best, it would be no different if he hadn’t said anything at all.

  • http://outsidetheautisticasylum.blogspot.com/ Theodore Seeber

    My parish did away with the adoration chapel because apparently to certain liberals, safety is more important than religion. The Church is locked whenever a staff member is not present, and since our Pastor has gone on an extended sabbatical, that is now over 100 hours a week that the church is locked.

  • Dale Price

    “Having a clear faith, based on the creed
    of the church is often labeled today as ‘fundamentalism.’ Whereas
    relativism, which is letting oneself be tossed and swept along by every
    wind of teaching, looks like the only attitude acceptable to today’s
    standards.”

  • StillOpenMinded

    Unfortunately, the “tabernacle or…Adoration chapel” you speak of (yes, the one tucked off to the side) likely does not have the presence of Christ there. Avoid these Novus Ordo masses and Churches because they–like this article–are empty.