Making Light: Hero Worship

In modern Hellenic polytheism, hero worship is part of the whole shebang. There’s a lot to work with in the body of primary literature from Classical Greece and beyond. Heracles was hugely popular and most Ancient Greeks would have known his story from Hesiod. The Iliad and the Odyssey both are full of bigger than life characters: Ajax, Hector, Achilles, and Odysseus to name a few. Then there’s Perseus, Theseus, Atalanta, and others.

Some people are more into it than others, and I’m one of the ones who isn’t really, except–

Except that I have an undying love of Captain America, that Wonder Woman influenced me from childhood,  and so much more. My heroes are of old if, by “of old,” you mean “within the last hundred years.” And I do. I may have had Wonder Woman underoos at some point as a kid and I may or may not have worn them to death. Remember when Superman died? Oh, gods, I thought my heart would crack at the idea of it. Superman can’t die! He’s Superman for gods’ sakes! And now, the newest crop of Marvel movies have basically enslaved my soul. Thor’s divinity was what originally attracted my eldest girl to these and now she regularly reads Hulk comics and loves Iron Man. She worships the heroes of our day now, too.

Their stories are told and retold, rebooted and then rebooted again. Our Homer is not any of the prose authors raised upon pedestals by many an English teacher, but the quirky white-haired Stan Lee. Our clever Odysseus, once clad in bronze armor, now bears the name Tony Stark and if he has a house in Ithaca, it’s in New York. The Hulk is our Ajax. Achilles is now… Cyclops? And then there is James Tiberius Kirk, another Odysseus, perhaps, a hero with his wayward crew on a journey to seek out new life and new civilizations, boldly going where no man has gone before! My heroes are many and their deeds are greater than any mortal man could accomplish. Flawed in their characters, they persevere through hardship after hardship, plunging into the darkest parts of the humanity and emerging again, greater than before. My heroes’ stories are played out in that descendant of the old Greek theater, the widescreen digital Dolby sound movie screen and the 52″ beauty in my living room, now in Blu Ray– better than technicolor. What more could a girl want than a bottle of wine and science fiction on the screen? Hail, Dionysos! Glory be to the Heroes! Jim Kirk is dead. Long live (and prosper) Jim Kirk!

“But they’re not real.”

I’ve heard this before and there may be one or two of you thinking this very same thing now. “Not real.” Generally, this is followed by a litany of historical persons, many of which I’m sure you can name without thinking too hard about it. There is nothing at all wrong in giving due reverence to these bodhisattvas of our world and it is to be encouraged. Someone like Rosa Parks or Martin Luther King, for example, deserves that much. To quote Epic Rap Battles of History, Martin Luther King has “so much street cred, they put his name on the sign.” But giving your spiritual props to a historical person doesn’t mean you can’t also worship the ideals of patriotism, integrity, justice, and bravery that we embody in our superheroes. And they are no more or less real than the figures from Homer and Hesiod.

Our heroes show us through their stories what arête looks like so that we can find it within ourselves. Captain America loves freedom without being a zealous nationalist and the difference between Professor X the hero and Magneto the villain is a desire for peaceful coexistence rather than dominance. The X-men regularly protect and defend the very same humans that would take their rights from them. Even their flaws help us seek arête. Peter Parker’s tragic indifference leads to Spider-Man’s great responsibility. Tony Stark is the poster boy for hubris and it bites him in the bum every time he writes a check his gold titanium alloy butt can’t cash. He always bounces back and and it’s a teaching moment for hero and reader alike. Iron Man 3 is a great representation of this.

More nerdy little kids have learned ethics and morality in complex and nuanced ways from superheroes than from reading Hesiod and Homer. We (Hellenic Polytheists) should certainly tell the stories of our ancient gods and heroes, but we don’t have to exclude these modern heroes simply because they are “not real.” And the stories of our superheroes do not diminish, but rather enrich the stories of great historical people. Elie Wiesel’s struggles are better understood if you’ve ever followed the X-men. Replace “mutants” with “Jews” or “African-Americans” or any ethnic group you could think of and you’ve got a detailed story about real prejudice, how insidious it can be, and how to and not to deal with it in daily life.

The point of a hero is not that they are real persons who did great things. The point is that they somehow embody arête and though we are not as great as they, we can emulate their excellence on a human scale. So perhaps I am into hero worship, but have been calling it fandom this whole time.

Below is a recipe I came up with for Avengers’ week dinner and it alludes to the Marvel Cinematic Universe where Bruce Banner spends time in India and South America. We also had spaghetti night (Captain America), pizza (Hawkeye), Serbian beef with beets (Black Widow), and fresh strawberries (Iron Man). A couple notes on my choices here: Serbian beef is not Russian, but is similar to some Hungarian cuisine, which she might have had in Budapest. Italian food really caught on in the US after WWII as soldiers who were stationed in Italy sought out something to eat that wasn’t rations. Hawkeye lives on pizza in the comics. Unfortunately, shawarma is hard to come by around here or we’d totally be having shawarma. Thursday, Thor’s day, we shall be having A GREAT FEAST OF LEFTOVERS! because it’s leftover night and I always make too much spaghetti.

[For clarifications on my views of heroes vs. superheroes vs. gods, please see next week's column.]

Bruce Banner’s Chicken Curry over Quinoa

6 boneless/skinless chicken thighs
3-4 carrots
1 large sweet potato
olive oil
1 tsp turmeric
1 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp coriander
1 tsp cumin
1 tsp paprika because my stepdad is of Hungarian descent and paprika is a vegetable, okay?
3/4 cup lamb or other broth
sprig of rosemary
a little bit of chives
1 cup quinoa
salt to taste

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F
Peel and cut sweet potatoes into 1/4 rounds about 1/4 in. thick. Cut carrots to a similar size. Grease a 9×12 glass baking dish with olive oil and toss in carrots and sweet potatoes. Add chicken. Combine turmeric, cinnamon, coriander, cumin, and paprika. Sprinkle spice mixture (no, it’s not too much. Go with it.) over the whole shebang. Add something spicier if you want to. Toss this around to evenly coat everything with spices, add broth, and place in the oven for about one hour or until chicken reaches a safe temperature.

Twenty minutes before chicken is done, chop up the chives and toss with rosemary into a small saucepan with the quinoa and a cup of water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low and simmer for 15 minutes. Add salt to taste.

Serves 4 (or 1 Hulk)


Making Light is an occasional column by Hellenic polytheist Sunweaver. Follow it via RSS or e-mail!

About Sunweaver

In addition to her personal and group practice as a priestess of Apollo, Sunweaver works as interfaith clergy with a diversity of religious groups in the Middle Tennessee area. She is a founding member of the Rutherford County Women of Faith and has worked with the area interfaith center, Wisdom House, to help bring positive awareness to the non-Abrahamic religions. She is a mother of two, a fiber arts enthusiast, and a holds a Master's degree in biology.

  • joyshine

    “So perhaps I am into hero worship, but have been calling it fandom this whole time.”

    Aaand suddenly, hero-worship makes a lot more sense to me. You can’t hear the things clicking into place in my head, but I assure you, there was audible clicking.

    Thank you!

    • Sunweaver

      Thanks, Joy!
      I heard the clicking sounds all the way across the mountains and everything. Sounds like movie popcorn…

  • Aine

    Great post!

    • Sunweaver

      Thanks!

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  • kenofken

    This is a powerful concept and one well worth exploring in pagan practice. Hero figures do play an important role in teaching us excellence, and they’re able to do so precisely because they are not constrained by historical truth or even existence.

    Myth endures because the concepts within it are timeless. The hero is just the media, not the message. A historian’s focus on the hero detracts from the purpose. Historians, and much of fandom, take the myopic focus on whether Hero X could really have done Deed Y because the account in Papyrus Z contradicts other accounts of the storyline. This work is important to understand the flesh and blood kernel of historical or allegedly historical figures, but it has nothing to do with the immortal hero that survived the grave. In that sense, the historicity or lack thereof plays no role in whether the hero is “real.”

    Martin Luther King and Abraham Lincoln are no more real as heroes than Captain America. That is to say the versions of both men 99% of us know are demi-gods that are only loosely based on the complexities of mundane fact that surrounded their brief lives as living breathing men. They’re able to teach us much more about tolerance and perseverance and honor and sacrifice today than they ever could as mortals.

    Comic book heroes are also just vehicles, and no less effective for having skipped over the biological preliminaries. Like all mythology, it has to give people an easy handhold and some reason other than dry scholarship to engage it. Nationalism and civic religion work for King and Lincoln. Entertainment works even better.

    Personally, the fictional hero pantheon that speaks most powerfully to me is Watchmen, The Comedian in particular. They have a lot to teach us about the downfalls of hubris and the dangers of allowing a nations own power to justify itself.

    • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

      Martin Luther King [Jr] and Abraham Lincoln are no more real as heroes than Captain America.

      If you’re practising Chaos Magic or similar, I’m sure that’s true. But in traditional Hellenism, King and Lincoln are certainly more real than a comic book character. The tombs of the heroes certainly suggest that the ancients believed that the likes of Trophonios, Iolaos, and others were more real than characters that only exist in stories. (Herakles is unusual, as He’s “heros theos”, being both Hero and God, and thus there was no cult centre with tomb to Herakles, but His worship was generally centralised in Thebes, similar to how, say, Athene’s was centralised in Athens.)

      I mean, if you want to believe that King and Lincoln and others are “no more real than” whatever comics you like, go right ahead, but that belief is not at all in line with the traditional ways of Hellenic polytheism.

      • kenofken

        I never claimed to be Hellenic, but nor am I a Chaos Mage or anything of the like. For whatever it may be worth, I’m an eclectic Wiccan heavily influenced by Celtic roots and originally trained by BTW, though of a disputed lineage. I see myself as taking a middle path where reconstructionism is concerned. I really do try to understand and honor whatever myths and deities and practices I use in the context of their historical sources.

        That said, I find the power of myth and heros to function independently of their historical veracity, and no matter how much scholarship and orthodoxy I employ, I’m never going to re-create the exact relationship with the gods and each other that the ancients had. It would be a waste of time and maladaptive even if I could. I have to engage my religion and everything else in the here and now.

        It’s somewhat tongue and cheek when I say King and Lincoln are “no more real” than comic heroes, but I stand by the core of that idea. They were historical figures, and that can be proven. The heroes they evolved into after death are, however, orders of magnitude larger than the men they arose from, and only loosely based on the enormous contradictions and complexities that comprise the biographies of a real human being.

        • Sunweaver

          “…no matter how much scholarship and orthodoxy I employ, I’m never going
          to re-create the exact relationship with the gods and each other that
          the ancients had. It would be a waste of time and maladaptive even if I
          could. I have to engage my religion and everything else in the here and
          now.”

          I know, right?! And the ancient myths, by and large, don’t need to be taken literally anyway. Historicity isn’t necessary for them to fill a need for us to derive value from them, even spiritual value. Did literal!Theseus fight a literal!Minotaur at some point in actual history? Who cares? Is the story full of rich meaning? Yes, indeed! Same with say, Spider-Man or G.I. Joe or another of our modern (super)heroes.

          • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

            Do you often attempt to make jabs at those who you clearly know nothing about?

            • Sunweaver

              No, honey, I wasn’t making a jab at you and I regret that you read it that way. I was, instead, agreeing with the other commenter and illustrating my belief in the context of this comment.
              Thank you for the invitation. I may well do that.

            • http://twitter.com/wodentoad Erin Lowe

              I am a fan of Wonder Woman, not because of anything
              in the comics or movies or television series, but by what she
              represents: Power, strength, femininity, and grace that can kick butt. I
              also wear a stone pendant in praise to Ix Chel, Mayan goddess of home,
              hearth, crafts, children, the moon, and War. (Mayan gods/goddesses were
              busy.) I don’t need dusty old books and codices to tell me what and how to honor her.

              I feel that if your Achillies is Tony Stark, then nothing is lost as long as your belief helps you cope with the world and be a better person while harming none. That’s what religion is for, lest you forgot.

              • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

                I am a fan of Wonder Woman, not because of anything in the comics or movies or television series, but by what she represents: Power, strength, femininity, and grace that can kick butt.

                You forgot bondage.

                I feel that if your Achillies is Tony Stark, then nothing is lost as long as your belief helps you cope with the world and be a better person while harming none. That’s what religion is for, lest you forgot.

                Religion is also for building a relationship with something bigger and more powerful than myself, including not just the culture, but the deities, spirits, heroes, and my own ancestors. Please refrain for assuming that what you’re into religion for is what everyone is into religion for.

                • Sunweaver

                  “Please refrain for assuming that what you’re into religion for is what everyone is into religion for.”

                  Those are wise words. Again, there are many approaches to religion and not a one of us has the monopoly on Truth. This is a good place for sharing our differences, but it is not a good place for belittling that which another finds meaningful. If further comments cannot be respectful in nature, they will be moderated.

                • Jessica Orsini

                  Right. I’ve had enough.

                  Hellenic belief is not static. It is not “religion-under-glass”. It was and remains a living, breathing, growing, changing thing. Heck, just the changes that happened within the first hundred Olympiads was more drastic than anything that has been brought up in this comment section so far. The Hellenic Greeks themselves were very open to people from beyond the peninsula giving kharis to the Theoi, and to bringing their own gods and cults along with them.

                  Have you ever used some of that ready-to-light charcoal that is used for incense? Where you light a corner of it and it does this interesting thing where it radiates out from there with sparks across the surface? That’s what it was like when Egyptians or Etruscans or Persians would haul into port with something new. The locals would pick it up, and take the visitors’ perspectives on the Theoi – as well as the foreign methods of observation – through the city; it would spark like that charcoal. And from there, it’d have those cascading sparks that would run up and down the coast, and inland to Delphi and such.

                  Sometimes, it wouldn’t take, and would fade away pretty quickly. But just as often, it would, and within a generation people would be meeting at the same crossroads with new stories of these new gods and heroes and how they would relate with the old. In a way similar to the technology explosion over the past 150 years in the US, Greece was having a cultural/philosophical/spiritual explosion back then.

                  This kind of change seems odd to us today. And that’s largely because religious change has slowed way, way, way down over the past 1400 years or so. Yes, it still changes. But people get mired in texts… and when that happens, they’re afraid to mess with things in a way that may alter what’s in those texts. The more that written doctrine and dogma circulated, the less people were willing to let religion evolve.

                  The reconstructionist element has largely lost sight of this. And that’s a shame. Because if they would consider the nature of reconstruction not as painstaking translations and adaptations of ancient text and instead as a holistic approach to the topic of reconstruction, they would realise that Hellenic belief isn’t something that coloured inside the lines. It evolved and grew and changed over the centuries when Hellenism was in full flower. Sunweaver is the very heart of genuine Hellenic reconstructionism, in the holistic rather than pedantic sense. She embodies that change, that growth, that adaptation of other people and ideas and cults and relationships into a greater whole which was a basic fact of Hellenic belief.

                  • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

                    Hellenic belief is not static. It is not “religion-under-glass”. It was and remains a living, breathing, growing, changing thing. Heck, just the changes that happened within the first hundred Olympiads was more drastic than anything that has been brought up in this comment section so far. The Hellenic Greeks themselves were very open to people from beyond the peninsula giving kharis to the Theoi, and to bringing their own gods and cults along with them.

                    Did I ever say it was “religion under glass”? I never once denied any of this that you say, but I also wouldn’t say that the Tuatha de Dannan are a part of Hellenic religion, nor Catholic confessions.

                    Sunweaver is the very heart of genuine Hellenic reconstructionism, in the holistic rather than pedantic sense.

                    Pedantic? Is that meant to be directed at me? If so, I find this incredibly odd, cos i’ve caught hell from certain people cos of a fourteen day festival celebrating Marc Bolan as heros. New heroes certainly happen, but I disagree that this “holistic” process could include characters that were never real outside the imagination.

                  • Sunweaver

                    Thank you for that beautiful response.

    • Sunweaver

      Thank you for your comment! I might say that MLK & Abe Lincoln are more real and possibly even more deserving of veneration because of it, but that fictional hero worship shouldn’t be dismissed out of hand just because the heroes are fictional.
      I’m not familiar with the Watchmen and would be interested in hearing more about how you connect your spirituality with their myths.

      • kenofken

        It might be too much to say that Watchmen directly informs my spirituality. That would lead a lot of folks to suspect the worst about my spirituality! I see Watchmen as a more realistic portrayal of super powers and how power corrupts.

        The movie and comics from which it derive imagine a sort of alternative track of American history in which a gang of superheros alters the outcome of the Cold War. One of them acquires god-like power. The rest are just extraordinarily smart or have borderline superhuman martial arts abilities. A couple are just psychotic thugs whose “good guy” credentials are relative to the rapists and murderers they prey upon.

        To me, it contains within it the incredible moral ambiguity of every revolution, every attempt to employ violence with good intentions. The liberators often become the worst oppressors. On the other hand, sometimes the worst hustlers and even murderers rise to excellence and commit acts of decency in spite of themselves.

        It poses the question “Who Watches the Watchmen?” How do you keep absolute power accountable, and what does it mean to be “the good guys”? I can’t think of a more relevant issue for out times, and it probes a question I think even our Hellenic folks can appreciate. Plato explored much the same idea as Watchmen in his Ring of Gyges.

        Movies that really dig into these tough questions of power and virtue speak to me. I can also recommend Bladrunner and Schindler’s List and Boondock Saints and any number of others. Myths and hero narratives are incredibly powerful and timeless teaching tools, whether they are “just” Hollywood creations or the Greek classics or whatever else. They all recycle the same quandries of what it means to be human which have been in play since the first group of hominids gained the capacity to start a fire and start telling stories around it.

        • Sunweaver

          That’s really interesting, thank you for sharing.

        • http://twitter.com/wodentoad Erin Lowe

          Watchmen was a difficult movie to watch, not the least because it was four and a half hours long. A minor niggle. However, as you pointed out it’s a lovely and gritty example of the hero, the hero’s fall, and some manner of Redemption.

  • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

    Are you sure you’re a Hellenic Polytheist? I’ve been a Hellene almost a decade, and active in the Hellenic community for about seven years, and a lot of what you’ve said here seems to sharply contradict much of what I’ve learned about hero cultus. Like the heroes are because they were once living people whose great deeds continued to shape the local consciousness and culture. Arête certainly was a part of the hero cult, but so was the tomb, the unique resting place of what was (or at least what was purported to be) the remains of the deceased hero.

    • Sunweaver

      Oh yes, I’m a Hellenic Polytheist. What I am not is a Reconstructionist. I am interested in Hellenic Orthodoxy only in a vaguely academic sense and it only really informs my practice when I feel like it meshes with the rest of my worldview. Being that I’m a suburban woman in the 21st century, much of ancient practice and some of ancient belief really isn’t relevant to me.

      • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

        I’m urban (a sustainable human habitat, unlike the ‘burbs) in the twenty first century, even a dedicated Modernist in many senses, and yet I still find the ancient ways incredibly relevant. They’re timeless and adaptable.

        And I wasn’t referring to your practises or personal beliefs. when you say things like “The point of a hero is not that they are real persons who did great
        things. The point is that they somehow embody arête and though we are
        not as great as they, we can emulate their excellence on a human scale”, you’re giving an historical context and giving the impression that this is in lime with ancient ideas. Maybe that’s not your intention, but that’s certainly the impression you give.

        • Sunweaver

          If it turns your spiritual crank, that’s great. It doesn’t mine and I’ve always been pretty explicit about that in my posts, so I’m not going to rehash that here.

          I don’t feel it’s necessary to qualify my statements, either. It should be obvious that I’m not talking about Joe Schmopolis from 3rd century BCE Thebes and if my language is broad in scope, I’m not even sorry. From my perspective (and that of several others, it appears), that *is* the point of a hero.

          Thank you for reading and providing an Orthodox Hellenic perspective.

          • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

            Kyrenaic Hedonism is now part of the “Hellenic orthodoxy”? That wasn’t even true in the BCE, but thanks for the entertainment.

            Oh, and thanks for arguing on appeal to popularity. It’s been a while since I put a stamp on that box in Fallacy Bingo.

            • Sunweaver

              There’s no reason to get nasty. You have a different perspective and that’s fine. The thing about religion is that there are lots of ways to do it right.

              • http://ofthespiae.hellenistai.com/ Ruadhán J McElroy

                That doesn’t mean all ways are right.
                And there’s no need to call other people thing they never once called themselves or insert your own snarky misconceptions, either (what the fup is “Orthodox Hellene”? Seriously, you’re being just as snide).

                • Sunweaver

                  “(of a person or their views, esp. religious or political ones, or other beliefs or practices) conforming to what is generally or traditionally accepted as right or true; established and “

                  In other words, what you referred to as “traditional Hellenism.” There’s nothing wrong with orthodoxy. It’s just not what I do. If you would like to have a polite conversation on the differences between your practice and mine, I would be glad to participate.

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  • http://twitter.com/wodentoad Erin Lowe

    I think this is a fascinating article in what speaks to a lot of people. Why look into dusty old books for your religion? The much venerated ancients were sorta making it up as they go along! And why not modernize and change things? They did that too!

    What speaks to Sun Weaver here on a deep and personal level to make HER a better person, may not speak to you. Does that make her wrong? This is why I despise reliance on the same dusty old books. They don’t speak to everyone, and they certainly don’t speak on a modern level. What I take away from this is her perspective on modern storytelling and how it speaks to her on a deep and personal level to make her a better person at the harm of none. What speaks to you on such a level may be different, but that doesn’t exactly give you a right to tell her she’s wrong for that. That makes you no better than those that tell me I’m going to be tortured for eternity because I believe something other than them, does it?

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  • fraterisla

    Great article! Nice to see this idea is being dealt with in a more serious way recently. Read the sannion post
    talking smack and put up one defending your honor:

    http://sonsofthebatman.blogspot.com/2013/05/sippin-on-dat-haterade-or-why-pagans.html

    well. Not defending your honor so much as being a snark-butt

  • http://www.facebook.com/farrell.mcgovern Farrell McGovern

    Hey, I wrote this article in the 1990! Although with a slightly different slant…please remember, I wrote this 23 years ago!

    From PODSnet Metaphysical message area
    (1623) Fri 19 Oct 90 2:50
    By: Farrell McGovern
    To: All
    Re: Channelling for Fun and Prophet

    Channelling is one of the more popular parts of what is call
    the “New Age”. It is also one of the most controversial aspects
    of this movement.

    To properly channel someone, be it Marilyn Monroe,
    Aleister Crowley (I have been told this doesn’t work well…) or
    Divine, one must know something of this person. The easiest way
    is by reading about this person. Autobiographies are the best, of
    course, but biographies, news reports, or even old photos are
    almost as good. You need some connection…

    In Pagandom, and Wicca, popular beings for channelling are
    various aspects of the God and the Goddess. Again, one must know
    as much as possible about the Lady or Lord that you are going to
    bring into yourself for the enjoyment, edification and education
    of the others in the Circle with you.

    The most popular source of information on Gods and Goddesses
    is again in books. Since there are many aspects of deities, there
    is a great deal of literature about these beings. Most of this
    literature that is over a couple of hundred of years old is
    usually in the form of Fables or Epics, which have more literary
    content than reality. One could easily call these works
    Docu-dramas, but they are still fiction.

    “But…” I hear you ask, “How can they channel these beings
    if all they know about them is fictional?” Well, there seems to
    be enough consensus on certain deities, but not on all. But these
    rituals work, as anyone who has attended the beautiful “Drawing
    Down the Moon” ritual of Wicca.

    So it seems to me that the idea of a “consensual reality” is
    created from the energies that all these people put into their
    concept of whatever God or Goddess they believe in. There are
    hundreds of thousands, maybe even millions of people who believe
    in Cerwdwyn, Eris, Hecate, Cernunnos, and others. But…are there
    not also millions of people who believe in Captain James T. Kirk?
    Arthur Dent? Catwoman? Batman? Smurfs?…..or even Peewee
    Herman?

    Imagine some Circle performing the Drawing Down The Moon
    ceremony, and due to a lack of concentration by the priestess,
    she channels, not Athena, but Marry Tyler-Moore?!?!?!? Or the
    priest channelling Peewee Herman?!?!?!

    We shall leave the further exploration of this to some
    experimental coven…but please! If you manage to channel Papa
    Smurf….we DON’T want to hear about it!

    • http://twitter.com/SableAradia Sable Aradia

      Good stuff, Farrell – thanks! May I repost this on my blog?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Dee-Romesburg/684106797 Dee Romesburg

    Thank the Gods I’m not the only one! I learned more about morals and ethics from comics than I ever did in church. I was turned on to Pagan deities from reading Wonder Woman. Have you read “Our Gods Wear Spandex” by Chris Knowles? Or “Supergods” by Grant Morrison? I highly recommend them both.

  • http://twitter.com/SableAradia Sable Aradia

    I love this article. I agree completely; I once wrote an article about how Wonder Woman was one of the many reasons I became a Witch. Besides the point – how do you know these characters aren’t real? Thoughtforms gather their own power. The eggregor of a coven becomes something more than the original coven, and it is possible to “create” elementals. Of course, they do not exist on this plane of existence, and if they do exist, it is in the astral plane or some alternate universe; but I think that other creatures we deal with, such as the Fair Folk, are not much different. The power of belief gives strength to a thoughtform, and building on previously existing deities can make it easier.

    I also agree that I don’t think their “reality” is relevant if we resonate with the myth. I am grateful that comic books keep heroic and moral ideals alive in the modern day. I am glad we don’t have to look strictly to our human leadership or our celebrities for role models. I am glad that myth lives well enough in the modern world to support multi-million dollar movies on the topic and multi-million dollar video game environments in which people actively play the heroes. It gives me hope for the human race.

    I am linking this article to both of my blogs, “Sable Aradia, Priestess & Witch,” and “Confessions of a Geek Queen” at WordPress, because it crosses over both subjects quite well. Thanks for taking the time to write this!

    • Sunweaver

      Thank you for taking the time to read!

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