How to Vote (quite literally)

It is one thing to become an informed voter and decide how you will cast your ballot. And it is important to talk to your kids about the importance of voting, but it is quite another to actually take 4 kids 7 and under to a polling location, wait in line while feeding a fussy baby, chasing a toddler, schooling a 2nd grader  and while, unbeknownst to you, your 5 year old is trying to see if your voter registration card will float in a puddle. This is precisely how they will learn just how much value you place in fulfilling your civic duty (I can remember exactly the school where my parents went to vote growing up), but you need to make it as easy on yourself as possible!

I know so many moms with great intentions, who are involved in so many ways and do everything except make it to the polling place. Kids get sick on election day. Or a soccer practice is in 15 minutes and the line for voting is out the door, so mom just keeps driving. Every vote counts. Our local race last week was decided by just 3 votes!

Blue and Pink states allow early voting

Many states have “no-excuse” early voting. If you live in one of these states, TAKE ADVANTAGE OF IT!!!! The lines are MUCH shorter and the earlier you go, the better! When I worked on the 2004 election campaigns, people would come to the victory center and ask how they could help or volunteer. I would ask if they had voted. If not, I gently directed them to get into their car and drive to the nearest early voting facility and cast their vote. This was more important than building 500 yards signs. Then, they were welcome to come back and we would put them to work. I don’t know much about state voting laws outside Texas, but Wikipedia tells me that many state allow in person early voting.

Another idea: write voting on your calendar as you would any other important appointment. I do this with confession sometimes. If it is written down I am more likely to get it done!!

  • Bethany “B-mama”

    I feel blessed that our voting location is our kids’ school, which is literally 400 yards outside my front door. I am usually one of the first people in line at the location and get it done before my hub has to leave for work. Praise God it is easy because I can see how busy parents have many obstacles standing in the way of their vote!

  • http://patheos.com/blogs/buildingcathedrals Katrina

    I voted early, and even though the line was long, it took less than 10 minutes to get through the line and to the polling machine. That time spent waiting in line was actually really nice – I was able to pray for all of the people there, for the future of our country, for all of our elected officials, etc. I felt very connected to my country! Go vote!

  • http://www.buildingcathedrals.com Mary Alice

    I moved here 4 years ago, and I had 5 small children. My neighbor doesn’t work on Tuesdays, and after she voted she came right to my house and offered to watch my children so that I could vote. She probably didn’t know how I would vote, and she didn’t care, either way she didn’t want me disenfranchised for lack of child care. After you vote, make sure your friends vote, too!


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