Whose Bible is it Anyway? A lesson in the Consequences of One's View of Scripture

Whose Bible is it Anyway? Who is the ultimate authority over what is true?  How does that affect what we think and believe?

About Drew Dixon

Drew is an editor at Christ and Pop Culture and editor-in-chief of Gamechurch.com. He is also a pastor, soccer coach, and writer. Drew also regularly writes for Think Christian, Bit Creature, and Paste Magazine. He has also written for Relevant Magazine. Follow him on Twitter @drewdixon82

  • Jason

    Very good read. I have often wondered, who made the Bible what it is today. The more I look into it the more I learn that there is a lot of “historical” facts that were not considered “relevant” to the “purpose” of the Bible. Who chose what went in and what didn’t?

    All in all I believe there is a version of the Bible out there that is written the way God wanted it to be written, but which one is it? There are hundreds, possibly thousands, of versions of the Bible. Many may vary only in one word, others may vary in a verse. Can one word change the meaning of the Bible,? Yes. Absolutly.

    You have different religions that have their roots grounded in subtle differences of our beliefs. They may believe the same general things as us, but their bible is missing a verse our bible has. Or good greif, this man read the Bible, decided to write a “study Bible” and then he will plant suggestions (either by accident or by design) into readers minds. This can cause serious repercussions. One suggestion, one verse, one misunderstanding is all it takes to ruin christianity.

    Case and point. The bible never states drinking alcohol is a sin. It states to be drunk with wine is a sin. A big difference between drink and drunk. But Christians, somewhere in time, decided to just not drink and then you wont get drunk. This led to the idea that Christians should not drink, and eventually, that drinking is bad. The suggestion has become that if you do drink, you are not a Christian, or at best a hypocrite. Nowadays we have a better understanding of those verses and we see it is not really wrong to drink, but the rest of the world has been taught to think that it is. So then we come to the issue of setting stumbling blocks. Is it my fault that my neighbor thinks its bad for a Christian to drink? The Bible doesn’t say it is, so if my neighbor sees me buying beer, and he thinks, “well there goes another one of those Christians, hypocrites” Who set the stumbling block, me, or the person who misinterpreted the Bible and made it a “rule” not to drink. Or could it even be the nighbors fault for assuming the worst instead of trying to understand.


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