A reader is dyeing to know…

Here’s a classic Easter-time quandary.

A friend writes:

How terrible is it if I have little kids come over to the apartment on Good Friday and color Easter eggs?

I answered: “Not terrible at all.  The color is black, right?”

She wasn’t amused.

Any thoughts?  What do you think?

Comments

  1. Does she mean to color eggs between the hours of 12 and 3?

    When my children were young, we got some great egg color sets from our local Christian bookstore with religious themes (stickers, stories, that sort of thing). And then, the Easter egg itself is full of symbolism: As the chick bursts forth from the egg, so does Jesus come out of the tomb at the Resurrection. And bunnies and chicks, daffodils and crocuses, are all symbols of New Life.

    Pysanky, the European custom of egg-dyeing using waxes and elaborate patterns, is rich with symbolism. Every line has a meaning. An unbroken circle around the egg, for example, signifies eternity.

    Egg coloring can be a wonderful Scripture study for the kids.

  2. Dev Thakur says:

    My first reaction (radical traditionalist reactionary that I am is ) that it is a terrible idea.

    But I must be wrong, there must be a way to do this while teaching the kids we are not enjoying Easter early, but rather we are with muted joy preparing for Easter (in more appropriate language for kids).

    Why did I change my mind? Well think about it: MCs and servers and priests and deacons must practice for the triduum rites before they occur, the deacon has to practice the exultet many days before singing it at the Vigil, the choir has to practice singing, with plenty of Alleluias, before we are able to hear them liturgically, etc etc.

    As long as on Good Friday we remember the Passion, we don’t have to “pretend” as if we don’t know there was a Resurrection. We know, and and we are joyful! We just don’t focus on the consolations of the Resurrection on Good Friday.

  3. Jim Dotter says:

    We always did the eggs on Saturday Night!

  4. We always color the eggs on Holy Saturday night, after the Vigil Mass, when the celebration of the Resurrection has begun. It might seem extreme, but we really try to conform all of our observances to the Church’s liturgical norms.

    Good Friday is a VERY low key day in the house. Services between 12-4, and that’s it. No games, no play. Simple meals for the children. No sweets, and complete fasting for the parents. It’s a quiet time, and the children have begun to pick up on its meaning.

  5. Why not have them come on Wednesday?

  6. Invite them over on Saturday and do it then. Good Friday is not the day to do it. First the Cross, and then the Resurrection.

  7. Ukrainian women write pysanky during Lent. Dying Easter eggs is part of the preparation for Easter, and it should be done before Easter, so that the pysanky can be blessed on Holy Saturday. Dyeing Easter eggs can certainly be a prayerful activity and I don’t see why it should be avoided on Good Friday. Definitely there is no need to delay dyeing Easter eggs until Easter Sunday.

  8. diakonos09 says:

    If Good Friday is the only day then go for it. A perfect way to teach about the Paschal Mystery which is what its all about. Depending upon the age of the kids involved, you could have a time of silence during the coloring while all think about the Passion…perhaps during this silence the eggs colored would be done with Passion themes/colors in mind and then after the silence share how one’s egg symbolizes the Passion?

  9. If the blessing of the basket is on Saturday, then they must be dyed beforehand.

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