Ordination update: 7 new deacons for Bridgeport

Just like in the beginning!

There’s an article about the men right here.

And from the bishop’s homily:

You are to be good servants of the Word,
and enthusiastic agents of the New Evangelization.
Never offer your own word, your own views, in place of the Word of Christ
as it comes to us through the teaching of the Church.
Allow the Word you proclaim to shape your inmost thoughts,
and to shine forth in your every word and deed.
To be sure you must study the Scripture, be aware of their inherent unity,
and be steeped in the Tradition of the Church.
But do not merely read the Word!
Pray and live the Word you proclaim and make it your goal to help those you serve
to embrace the truth, beauty, and goodness of our Catholic faith.
Do not let the noise of the world crowd the Word of God out of your hearts.
As the psalmist says, “Be still and know that I am God!”
In your daily lives as married men and in your professional lives,
show how God’s Word can be put into practice.
In your zeal for souls, bring Christ’s message to all who are searching for God
and to those who have grown lax or alienated from the Church.
Pray, proclaim, preach, evangelize!

Amen.  Congratulations!  Ad multos annos!

Comments

  1. Hmm…
    Two are 64 and one is 61.

  2. Deacon Greg Kandra says:

    HMS…

    In my class, the oldest ordained was 70.

    Dcn. G.

  3. Dcn Greg;

    I was thinking of the pastoral letter of Bishop Alexander K. Sample of the Diocese of Marquette that you posted a few days ago. In my diocese the age requirement is no less than 35 or more than 60 at the time of ordination. (There was one exemption given. He was, I think, 62 when ordained.)

    I bet the 70-year-old deacon is doing a great job. There’s a lot of life left in a 70 year old. Trust me, I know.

  4. I think in contemporary America the age “impact” is about 10 years behind the actual physical age of the person. In other words 50′s is the new 40′s and 60′ the new 50′s and on. While someone 70 is ancient in some African or other developing regions, here in the U.S. is different. Possibly the ministry should adapt to the local situation.

  5. Deacon:
    Thank you for posting these ordination updates. God willing I will be ordained in September. The bishops’ homilies are very encouraging.

  6. Thanks, Greg, for the item on the diaconate ordination in Bridgeport. Interesting that earlier commenters focus on the age issue.

    I thought the most interesting part of the bishop’s homily was this:

    Finally you are to serve the poor and needy,
    imitating the Lord who washed the feet of the apostles at the Last Supper.
    In today’s Gospel we read how Jesus rose from table, removed his outer garments,
    and knelt to wash the feet of Peter and the other Apostles:
    the Creator before the creature, the Eternal Son of God,
    who stripped himself of glory so as to clothe us with his.
    Because you have heard and proclaimed the Word,
    and shared deeply in the sacramental life of the Church,
    you are prepared also to empty yourselves by reaching out in love to the poor, the vulnerable, the sick, and the troubled, Christ in all his “distressing disguises” as Blessed Mother Teresa often said.

    In summarizing, Bishop Lori reinforced his point:
    “remember also that a deacon’s ministry is neither fully diaconal nor unified if he is only a servant of the Word or the altar, but does not serve the poor directly. Your ministry must include some form of direct service to the poor.”

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