From death to life: couple seeks to help others heal after abortion

It’s something many couples would prefer to forget.  But from the St. Louis Review comes this inspiring story of a courageous couple who can’t forget — and who are reaching out to help others.

Chuck Raymond clearly remembers the moment a visiting priest came to his parish and spoke at Mass on the subject of abortion.

It was a moment in which the Holy Spirit was “calling me out,” he said. More than two decades ago, when they were teenagers, he and his wife, Linda, made the decision to end their unplanned pregnancy with an abortion. It was a heartbreaking moment from their past that they shared with few.

In the pews were brochures on Project Rachel, the Catholic Church’s ministry to those who have been through an abortion. He knew he had to take one home to show his wife.

But Raymond said he was “petrified” that his fellow parishioners might see him pick up the brochure and became paranoid of what they might think of him. Once he brought home that brochure, it was several weeks before he had the courage to show it to Linda.

Fast forward several years later, and the Raymonds, members of Holy Infant Parish in Ballwin, have taken their sorrow and turned it into a message of hope, through sharing — here and around the United States — their personal story of woundedness and healing with others who have experienced an abortion.

“We want to try to get out (the message) that they’re not alone,” said Linda Raymond. “The good news is Christ loves you so much, He wants to heal you and still love you.”

It was 1976, just three years after the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Roe vs. Wade to make abortion legal in the United States. Chuck Raymond was a senior in high school and Linda was a freshman at a local junior college when the two discovered that Linda was pregnant.

After the abortion, the two eventually married in 1981 and had two more children. They put the abortion behind them, suppressing their emotions about it for years.

“Every now and then a comment (about the abortion) came up,” said Chuck Raymond. But it wasn’t until their children became adolescents that the couple started thinking about whether they had prepared them as they were becoming sexually mature — including talking about topics such as respect for their own bodies and members of the opposite sex.

Linda Raymond also was struggling on and off with depression. She surrounded herself with questions about whether she was being a good mother to her children. Her husband started to wonder whether the abortion had something to do with it.

Read what happened next.

Comments

  1. I would like to say THANK YOU to the Raymond’s and to GOD. He has given them the opportunity (and the strength) to share their message with others.

    We need to help the Raymond’s and others, in getting the message out. Support them by prayer and of course, thru your $$ to organizations such as Project Rachel.

    Their message is more powerful that anyone on the pro-abortion side can bring. The pro-abortion folks may have the media in their hip pockets, but more and more the message of life, of love, of hope, and of forgiveness is getting through.

    May God Bless the Raymond’s and all those who share their suffering and message of hope.

  2. ron chandonia says:

    Working in a low-income black community, I taught many young women who had experienced abortion. I know because many of them confided the information to me, at times because they were desperate to talk seriously about their feelings. The “woundedness” discussed in the article seems to manifest itself in many ways, some healthier than others. Some of my students told me that they had become emotionally hardened afterwards–even to the point of choosing abortion repeatedly. In other cases, though, they sought ways to make up for the loss; one outstanding woman, for instance, had devoted herself to the care of profoundly retarded children.

    As the article illustrates, I found that it was not just women but young men too who were transformed by an abortion experience: too many of them hardened by it, but others remorseful and seeking outlets for their grief. It’s not hard to find pro-life resource centers for those considering an abortion decision; it should be easier to find similar resources for those who are suffering from having chosen wrongly.

  3. I have worked with Project Rachel for many years now. In that work, I often meet with those who have been the victim of the culture of death in our society. Many have been lied to and given excuses that allowed them to make this horrible choice and some of those who have led them astray have been Catholics, some of them priests. I often think of the words proportiante reason during these discussions.

    I have yet to have anyone give me a proportiante reason to kill a child that would bring healing to those who took the life. I have yet to have anyone give a proportiante reason for supporting those who keep it legal and protected. When this is tied to the growing evidence of harm to the womans health with the long term use of BC or Birth Control use at an early age or the impact of abortion on women both mentally and physcially, it begins to be seen for all its evil. It makes me laugh when I hear someone talk about the need for abortion because of the health of the mom. They should work in Project Rachel for a few years and then make that statement.

    I think about my granddaughter killed in the abortion mill along with my great grandchild and even now makes my blood boil at the lies and hypocrisy of those who support those who keep the party of death alive. They are the equivalent of those who supported slavery and lynching, the other great evil in the history of America.

Leave a Comment


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X