A glimpse into the Prince Caspian movie.


ComingSoon.net just posted a handful of interviews with some of the key actors in The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian. Naturally, the quotes I gravitate to are the ones that hint at how the story may have been changed from the original book.

First, the interview with Ben Barnes (Prince Caspian):

CS: Is there anything specifically in the book about Caspian that’s inspired you?
Barnes:
Specifically in the book, I don’t know. I guess some of the earlier chapters where he’s having his conversations with Cornelius about what Narnia means and we don’t have a huge amount of that kind of explanation of the exploration of that piece in the movie, simply because everyone knows it from the first movie. It’s kind of something that’s assumed, but Caspian hasn’t known it so obviously that kind of helps to inform where I take the character and my approach to my surprise and my joy, while it’s quite a hard thing to understand that I’m going to have to fight against my own people. So I think that was kind of very informative.

Second, the interview with William Moseley (Peter Pevensie):

CS: How is their relationship different in the movie than it is in the book? In the book, it seems like they get along, but in the movie it sounds like they have a rivalry.
Moseley:
I think it’s interesting that they played on that rivalry, because…I don’t know, I think that’s really the way it would be in real life. Peter’s got his own issues to deal with, and Caspian’s got his own issues to deal with, and when neither is willing to compromise there’s bound to be friction. That’s really what happens. And it’s a lot about humility. I think they both have to learn a certain humility, a certain… and that’s really what a great King needs is to be humble, to listen to his people, to be willing to compromise, and they start off as these sort of angry teenagers, and become kings at the end, and Peter passes on his sword and, I don’t know, Narnian strength on to Caspian. But it is interesting, I agree, I think it’s a really good thing that they’ve done that.

Finally, the joint interview with Sergio Castellitto (King Miraz) and Pierfrancesco Favino (General Glozelle):

CS: Do you have a lot of scenes with Ben Barnes, who plays Prince Caspian? There weren’t a lot of scenes with them together in the book.
Castellitto:
The most important scene between us is when he comes to my bedroom and he wants to know the truth about the death of his father. This is the first fight. At the end of the fight when William says…
Favino: Don’t tell everything
Castellitto: Ah, okay, read the book.

William? William? As in, William Moseley, the actor who plays Peter? That scene sounds like it should be pretty early in the story. Is Peter involved that early in the story, now? As ever, I have absolutely no idea what to expect from this movie …

About Peter T. Chattaway

Peter T. Chattaway was the regular film critic for BC Christian News from 1992 to 2011. In addition to his film column, which won multiple awards from the Evangelical Press Association, the Canadian Church Press and the Fellowship of Christian Newspapers, his news and opinion pieces have appeared in such publications as Books & Culture, Christianity Today, Bible Review and the Vancouver Sun. He also contributed essays to the books Re-Viewing The Passion: Mel Gibson’s Film and Its Critics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2004) and Scandalizing Jesus?: Kazantzakis’s The Last Temptation of Christ Fifty Years on (Continuum, 2005).

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02216032513913735237 LuminousSpecter

    Yeah, they’re apparently bringing the Pevensies into Narnia closer to the beginning of the story. It is to allow more of an adventure with the characters together, instead of spending half of the film with them simply travelling.


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