The iPad

Apple’s new tablet computer was unveiled yesterday.  It seems to really be a sort of super-Kindle, something that can download books and newspapers, as well as lots of other iPhone-like applications.

After months of hype and rumour-mongering that only seemed to get more intense the more tight-lipped Apple executives became, Jobs stepped on to a San Francisco stage yesterday to declare the opening of a whole new category of electronic device. Halfway between a smartphone and a portable computer, the touchscreen-operated iPad will provide a whole new way to buy books and newspapers, play games, watch films and TV shows and surf the web, he said.

“We want to kick off 2010 by introducing a truly magical and revolutionary product,” he said. “It's so much more intimate than a laptop and so much more capable than a smart phone.”

Apple is confident the iPad will escape the fate of previous attempts at tablet computers – including the company's own Newton device, launched with a fanfare in 1993 – now that so many more applications are available to enrich the device. Like the iPhone before it, the iPad will cause “another gold rush for app developers”, Jobs predicted.

And he also yesterday launched the iBookstore, from where users can quickly and easily download electronic books to read on the device. Gallantly, Jobs said he was “standing on the shoulders” of Amazon, which has pioneered the e-reader with its Kindle device, but commentators are already predicting that limited-function e-readers face a dangerous new competitive threat from the iPad. Unlike on the first generation of e-readers, the new device can feature colour photos and video, if authors wish. Certainly publishers lined up to support the Apple debut. Simon & Schuster, Rupert Murdoch's Harper Collins, and Macmillan were among those immediately committing to sell books for the iPad.

The hopes of many media executives are pinned on the iPad, and other similar tablet devices promised by PC manufacturers this year, since they offer an opportunity to replace the declining readership of newspapers and magazines with new subscribers to bespoke applications for the devices, opening up a second chance to charge for digital content that is currently given away for free on websites. The New York Times was among the companies called to the stage to promote a dedicated iPad app yesterday, saying it would offer a more newspaper-like experience than anything that has been created for a smartphone.

Versions of the new device have 16GB, 3GB and 64GB of memory, with or without 3G wireless service on top of the standard wi-fi internet connectivity. Prices will range from $499 to $829 in the US, and the first versions will go on sale in 60 days.

Do you think it will kill Kindle? Do you think it will save journalism and the publishing industry by letting them continue their subscriptions and sales, only without paper? Do you want one? Are you going to get one?

via Has Apple really changed the world again? – News, Gadgets & Tech – The Independent.

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • Josh V.

    I don’t think it is going to change the world. It is one of two things: a supersized iPhone or a MacBook sans the physical keyboard. All of that said, it is a pretty tech toy. I would not be opposed to owning one, but it is far from a must have product for me.

    Will it kill the Kindle? I hope not, because I bought one last month. The problem I do see with getting an iPad for reading eBooks is all the other stuff it can do. I have a PC and a laptop for productivity and tooling around on the internet. These tools serve as enough of a distraction to get in the way of my reading. I can only imagine the strain on my willpower to resist going on the web to check e-mail, Facebook, news, or favorite blogs while I am trying to read.

    The nice thing about the Kindle and other eReaders is that they are dedicated to one major function: reading. The Kindle is a fine balance between hi-tech and a real book. I really like the eInk screen which is easy on the eyes and closely emulates the page of a book. It allows me to carry around a whole library of books without the added weight. Also, the battery life on an eReader, like the Kindle, is massive compared to the iPad’s 10 hours. In this way, I do not have to worry very much about losing power on the go. Ultimately, though, it comes down to the fact that when I am reading, I do not want to provide outlets for that nagging temptation to do other things. For me, reading on the iPad would be like trying to eat a healthy diet if Thanksgiving took place everyday.

  • Josh V.

    I don’t think it is going to change the world. It is one of two things: a supersized iPhone or a MacBook sans the physical keyboard. All of that said, it is a pretty tech toy. I would not be opposed to owning one, but it is far from a must have product for me.

    Will it kill the Kindle? I hope not, because I bought one last month. The problem I do see with getting an iPad for reading eBooks is all the other stuff it can do. I have a PC and a laptop for productivity and tooling around on the internet. These tools serve as enough of a distraction to get in the way of my reading. I can only imagine the strain on my willpower to resist going on the web to check e-mail, Facebook, news, or favorite blogs while I am trying to read.

    The nice thing about the Kindle and other eReaders is that they are dedicated to one major function: reading. The Kindle is a fine balance between hi-tech and a real book. I really like the eInk screen which is easy on the eyes and closely emulates the page of a book. It allows me to carry around a whole library of books without the added weight. Also, the battery life on an eReader, like the Kindle, is massive compared to the iPad’s 10 hours. In this way, I do not have to worry very much about losing power on the go. Ultimately, though, it comes down to the fact that when I am reading, I do not want to provide outlets for that nagging temptation to do other things. For me, reading on the iPad would be like trying to eat a healthy diet if Thanksgiving took place everyday.

  • Kirk

    I’m with Josh, this thing just looks like a giant iPhone. I’ve not used it, but tablets are nothing new, and I don’t see it revolutionizing the world. Other companies have released concepts for the next generation of tablets and readers and the far out pace the iPad in awesomeness. I think that Apple isn’t releasing anything new, and that they’re a few years late to the party, anyways. Of course, people will buy it. There’s a significant crowd that will buy anything shiny that has an apple loco slapped onto it, so I don’t think it’ll be a business failure, or anything. It’s just not going to blow minds.

  • Kirk

    I’m with Josh, this thing just looks like a giant iPhone. I’ve not used it, but tablets are nothing new, and I don’t see it revolutionizing the world. Other companies have released concepts for the next generation of tablets and readers and the far out pace the iPad in awesomeness. I think that Apple isn’t releasing anything new, and that they’re a few years late to the party, anyways. Of course, people will buy it. There’s a significant crowd that will buy anything shiny that has an apple loco slapped onto it, so I don’t think it’ll be a business failure, or anything. It’s just not going to blow minds.

  • Emmanuel Hechon

    Hi,

    I don’t think that the same people are interested in the two products. I’m in france, so Kindle is only avalable for a few month, and I think about buying one for three reasons :
    - the EInk technology seems comfortable
    - it works a week without charging
    - I usually buy books from USA and I wait sometimes one month between the moment I bought the book and the moment I receive it.

    The first feature on the IPad I look at were the screen technology (LCD) and how long the charge holds (10 hours). I read several books a months and work on computer everyday, there is no way I will buy something that I have to read on a computer screen and that I have to charge every two days or so.

    I think that the IPad will be great for the multimedia guies who want to listen music, watch movies and read once a while, but not for those who want to read most of the time.

    If one day there is a technology which can have multimedia features without throwing light in your eyes as do LCD, it is possible that I try it, but for now it is either EInk (or the like) or nothing.

    Regards,

    Emmanuel
    (sorry, if my english is not fine, I do my best)

  • Emmanuel Hechon

    Hi,

    I don’t think that the same people are interested in the two products. I’m in france, so Kindle is only avalable for a few month, and I think about buying one for three reasons :
    - the EInk technology seems comfortable
    - it works a week without charging
    - I usually buy books from USA and I wait sometimes one month between the moment I bought the book and the moment I receive it.

    The first feature on the IPad I look at were the screen technology (LCD) and how long the charge holds (10 hours). I read several books a months and work on computer everyday, there is no way I will buy something that I have to read on a computer screen and that I have to charge every two days or so.

    I think that the IPad will be great for the multimedia guies who want to listen music, watch movies and read once a while, but not for those who want to read most of the time.

    If one day there is a technology which can have multimedia features without throwing light in your eyes as do LCD, it is possible that I try it, but for now it is either EInk (or the like) or nothing.

    Regards,

    Emmanuel
    (sorry, if my english is not fine, I do my best)

  • http://takingthoughtscaptive.wordpress.com T.C. Judd

    I wouldn’t even go so far as to say it’s a jumbo iPhone…really little more than an oversized iPod touch with 3G capability. As I see it, it would be fun for media and for some of the iPod apps I would like to have more screen real estate to utilize (Olive Tree bible software comes to mind!) but not exactly a revolution.

    I also don’t see it as a Kindle killer by any stretch of the imagination. I spend lots of time in front of a computer, and my eyes hate me for it. The eyestrain from an active screen (computer, iPod, iPhone, etc.) is awful. I can read on my Kindle, on the other hand, with less eyestrain than a regular print book with it’s bright white pages. Until someone finds a way to come up with color ‘ink’ version of the ‘ink’ used by Kindle, which would be truly revolutionary, I don’t see anything surpassing it as a superior platform for reading.

  • http://takingthoughtscaptive.wordpress.com T.C. Judd

    I wouldn’t even go so far as to say it’s a jumbo iPhone…really little more than an oversized iPod touch with 3G capability. As I see it, it would be fun for media and for some of the iPod apps I would like to have more screen real estate to utilize (Olive Tree bible software comes to mind!) but not exactly a revolution.

    I also don’t see it as a Kindle killer by any stretch of the imagination. I spend lots of time in front of a computer, and my eyes hate me for it. The eyestrain from an active screen (computer, iPod, iPhone, etc.) is awful. I can read on my Kindle, on the other hand, with less eyestrain than a regular print book with it’s bright white pages. Until someone finds a way to come up with color ‘ink’ version of the ‘ink’ used by Kindle, which would be truly revolutionary, I don’t see anything surpassing it as a superior platform for reading.

  • Joe

    I don’t see myself ever using this. I watched part of Jobs’ introduction of it and I felt like he was not even that excited about it. I don’t see the revolutioniary aspect of this product.

  • Joe

    I don’t see myself ever using this. I watched part of Jobs’ introduction of it and I felt like he was not even that excited about it. I don’t see the revolutioniary aspect of this product.

  • John

    Unfortunately the iPad is not a stand alone computer and still is not flash compatible or open sourced.

    Apple should have focused it’s efforts on making the iPhone better and at least up to par with the Droid instead of pursuing the eBook reader…this is a dead-end business plan.

    Apple should have also announced that they would open up their products to all smart phone carriers.

    I am a big Apple/Mac fan and user, but they dropped the ball on this one.

    Try again Jobs.

  • John

    Unfortunately the iPad is not a stand alone computer and still is not flash compatible or open sourced.

    Apple should have focused it’s efforts on making the iPhone better and at least up to par with the Droid instead of pursuing the eBook reader…this is a dead-end business plan.

    Apple should have also announced that they would open up their products to all smart phone carriers.

    I am a big Apple/Mac fan and user, but they dropped the ball on this one.

    Try again Jobs.

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    Consider what iTunes has done for music.

    Now consider the potential of iBooks.

    ’nuff said.

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    Consider what iTunes has done for music.

    Now consider the potential of iBooks.

    ’nuff said.

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    It’s all about Apple planting its flag firmly in the “e-reader” marketplace. As iTunes was to music, so Apple is hopeful that iBook will be to books/magazines, etc.

    There were many people who were VERY skeptical of iPod and iTunes. And, 250,000,000 copies of iPods sold and one billion app downloads, and who knows how many music downloads on iTunes, everyone has learned that such strategies are not to be ignored, but embraced.

    I find this a very fascinating thing to watch.

    Do I want one? Yes.

    Do I need one? Since I have an iPhone, an iPod Touch, a Mac notebook, and a big old honkin’ desktop, at home and work, I can’t see why I need one or how I would use it really.

    But do I want one? Of course!!

    : )

  • http://www.cyberbrethren.com Rev. Paul T. McCain

    It’s all about Apple planting its flag firmly in the “e-reader” marketplace. As iTunes was to music, so Apple is hopeful that iBook will be to books/magazines, etc.

    There were many people who were VERY skeptical of iPod and iTunes. And, 250,000,000 copies of iPods sold and one billion app downloads, and who knows how many music downloads on iTunes, everyone has learned that such strategies are not to be ignored, but embraced.

    I find this a very fascinating thing to watch.

    Do I want one? Yes.

    Do I need one? Since I have an iPhone, an iPod Touch, a Mac notebook, and a big old honkin’ desktop, at home and work, I can’t see why I need one or how I would use it really.

    But do I want one? Of course!!

    : )

  • DonS

    It’s like a big iPhone, but without the phone! Two problems I see are a) it is a niche product, since you can’t really substitute it for any of the other devices you presently have, and b) it’s expensive! $499 to start, but over $800 for one decked out with all the bells and whistles, including a reasonable memory. It seems to me that it is more of a toy for the early adopters than it is a tool for the masses.

  • DonS

    It’s like a big iPhone, but without the phone! Two problems I see are a) it is a niche product, since you can’t really substitute it for any of the other devices you presently have, and b) it’s expensive! $499 to start, but over $800 for one decked out with all the bells and whistles, including a reasonable memory. It seems to me that it is more of a toy for the early adopters than it is a tool for the masses.

  • Jonathan

    Hmm. The Itunes analogy for IBooks interests me.

    Itunes resides principally on a PC or Mac. You can run it on a notebook or a desktop machine, but to really make the most use of it, you have to have an IPod.

    If the Ibooks software will reside on a PC like Itunes does, you may not need an IPad to get pretty good practical use out of the software. Why would I buy an IPad to read Ibooks, if I could just use my notebook or netbook?

    I bet that thought has probably already gone into the design of software design for IBooks.

  • Jonathan

    Hmm. The Itunes analogy for IBooks interests me.

    Itunes resides principally on a PC or Mac. You can run it on a notebook or a desktop machine, but to really make the most use of it, you have to have an IPod.

    If the Ibooks software will reside on a PC like Itunes does, you may not need an IPad to get pretty good practical use out of the software. Why would I buy an IPad to read Ibooks, if I could just use my notebook or netbook?

    I bet that thought has probably already gone into the design of software design for IBooks.

  • Rev. Alexander Ring

    I’m getting deja vu.

    “It isn’t anything new”. “There are other products that do the same thing but are cheaper.” “$399 is too expensive; no one will buy it”. “It’s pretty, but not really practical.” “It’s a tight market; it will be tough for Apple to break into it, especially at that price.”

    These are all quotes from reviews of the 1st Gen iPod.

    Having said that, I’m not all that interested in getting one; my iPod touch is much more practical for me. But Pr McCain is right; this thing will be big. It is more than a big iPod touch; it is 1.5 lbs of potential.

  • Rev. Alexander Ring

    I’m getting deja vu.

    “It isn’t anything new”. “There are other products that do the same thing but are cheaper.” “$399 is too expensive; no one will buy it”. “It’s pretty, but not really practical.” “It’s a tight market; it will be tough for Apple to break into it, especially at that price.”

    These are all quotes from reviews of the 1st Gen iPod.

    Having said that, I’m not all that interested in getting one; my iPod touch is much more practical for me. But Pr McCain is right; this thing will be big. It is more than a big iPod touch; it is 1.5 lbs of potential.

  • Jonathan

    But I got an Ipod because I can run with it, take it with me wherever I go, while the Itunes program and music library stays on my desktop or notebook computer.

    Why would I need to leave the mothership PC notebook or netbook for that matter to use IBooks on an IPad that can’t do as much? I’d probably end up having to carry around my Notebook/Netbook and an IPad.

  • Jonathan

    But I got an Ipod because I can run with it, take it with me wherever I go, while the Itunes program and music library stays on my desktop or notebook computer.

    Why would I need to leave the mothership PC notebook or netbook for that matter to use IBooks on an IPad that can’t do as much? I’d probably end up having to carry around my Notebook/Netbook and an IPad.

  • Joe

    The possibilites for iBooks do seem exciting, but the iPad itself looks pretty lame to me. But it does more than just ebooks, goes out the cry. True, but it is what it does not do that is more important. This is not an alternative platform – it is an additional platform. It is another device; in addition to my laptop. Granted so is the Kindle – but it is not trying to be more.

    Further, it is not even full service in the multi-media department. As of now – Flash based videos and games will not run on the iPad. That accounts for about 75% of all video on the web. I hear they are going to fix this, but it will either be done with apps that give a limited screen size or will be in the next generation iPad. But most importantly, if I am going to have to read on an LCD screen, I’d rather also have the full capabilities of a laptop.

    Other than the undying devotion many people have to Apple, I really don’t see why anyone would actually choose this over a convertible PC laptop/tablet product.

  • Joe

    The possibilites for iBooks do seem exciting, but the iPad itself looks pretty lame to me. But it does more than just ebooks, goes out the cry. True, but it is what it does not do that is more important. This is not an alternative platform – it is an additional platform. It is another device; in addition to my laptop. Granted so is the Kindle – but it is not trying to be more.

    Further, it is not even full service in the multi-media department. As of now – Flash based videos and games will not run on the iPad. That accounts for about 75% of all video on the web. I hear they are going to fix this, but it will either be done with apps that give a limited screen size or will be in the next generation iPad. But most importantly, if I am going to have to read on an LCD screen, I’d rather also have the full capabilities of a laptop.

    Other than the undying devotion many people have to Apple, I really don’t see why anyone would actually choose this over a convertible PC laptop/tablet product.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr Luther in the 21st Century

    I think like the iPod touch/iPhone it is going to force innovation on the part of its competition. I like the idea of a touch screen tablet, but I already have a laptop and an iPhone, so the iPad is not really high on my want list.

    Is it me or could apple have come with a better name than iPad. Everytime, I hear the name I can’t help but think of feminine products.

  • http://lutherama.blogspot.com Dr Luther in the 21st Century

    I think like the iPod touch/iPhone it is going to force innovation on the part of its competition. I like the idea of a touch screen tablet, but I already have a laptop and an iPhone, so the iPad is not really high on my want list.

    Is it me or could apple have come with a better name than iPad. Everytime, I hear the name I can’t help but think of feminine products.

  • Kirk

    http://www.uncrate.com/men/gear/misc-gadgets/skiff/

    This is more along the lines of what excites me. I’ve also heard talk of having a literally flexible reader, made out of a metal that can bend, slightly, without breaking. That’s cool.

  • Kirk

    http://www.uncrate.com/men/gear/misc-gadgets/skiff/

    This is more along the lines of what excites me. I’ve also heard talk of having a literally flexible reader, made out of a metal that can bend, slightly, without breaking. That’s cool.

  • Peter Leavitt

    Im, a great Apple fan with an i Phone and Mac; I intend to get the Pad, mainly for WSJ, IBD, NYT , WAPO, and Barrons subscriptions along with one read light books. Serious books will continue to be bought from a local book store and kept in a good old-fashioned library, where BTW I have a few of Veith’s books.

    Steve Jobs is a quintessential American entrepreneur.

  • Peter Leavitt

    Im, a great Apple fan with an i Phone and Mac; I intend to get the Pad, mainly for WSJ, IBD, NYT , WAPO, and Barrons subscriptions along with one read light books. Serious books will continue to be bought from a local book store and kept in a good old-fashioned library, where BTW I have a few of Veith’s books.

    Steve Jobs is a quintessential American entrepreneur.

  • Joe

    “I like the idea of a touch screen tablet, but I already have a laptop and an iPhone, so the iPad is not really high on my want list.”

    This is kind of my point – the PC manufactures are making laptops with touch screens that can be used as a tablet. You just spin the screen around backwards and close it. It covers the keys and leaves the touch screen up. I guess I am just trying to figure out why Apple did not go that far with the iPad. Gives you one device with all the capabilties: e-reader, web browser and regular old computer stuff.

    I like Apple – big iPhone and Mac Book fan. I just don’t see the point of this. I can read the WSJ on my Mac Book just as easily as I can on the iPad.

  • Joe

    “I like the idea of a touch screen tablet, but I already have a laptop and an iPhone, so the iPad is not really high on my want list.”

    This is kind of my point – the PC manufactures are making laptops with touch screens that can be used as a tablet. You just spin the screen around backwards and close it. It covers the keys and leaves the touch screen up. I guess I am just trying to figure out why Apple did not go that far with the iPad. Gives you one device with all the capabilties: e-reader, web browser and regular old computer stuff.

    I like Apple – big iPhone and Mac Book fan. I just don’t see the point of this. I can read the WSJ on my Mac Book just as easily as I can on the iPad.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Joe (@17), you said, “I can read the WSJ on my Mac Book just as easily as I can on the iPad.” Well, yes and no. I think what’s interesting about the iPad is its portability. Do you take your MacBook everywhere you go? Probably not; they tend to be a bit heavy to lug around all the time, and besides, the moving parts on the disk drive aren’t well suited to the bumps of daily travel. Can you read the WSJ on your MacBook at any random spot in the city? Probably not; it works fine at home or the coffee shop, maybe, but you’re pretty limited to where you can connect.

    With the 3G option on the iPad, it truly becomes a computer you can (and actually might) take everywhere, and it’ll have an Internet connection everywhere, as well (with the usual caveat about AT&T’s coverage). I think that’s the most interesting thing about this device. If you only want to use it at home, then it is probably worse than a laptop.

    But for a person like me who rides the bus daily, it’s a rather interesting concept (not that I’m likely to get one anytime soon). I’ve seen people trying to use laptops on the bus, and it doesn’t really work, for several reasons.

    But it all depends on how you use the Internet. For some people, the iPhone does the same thing for just as well (plus makes phone calls). We’ll see.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Joe (@17), you said, “I can read the WSJ on my Mac Book just as easily as I can on the iPad.” Well, yes and no. I think what’s interesting about the iPad is its portability. Do you take your MacBook everywhere you go? Probably not; they tend to be a bit heavy to lug around all the time, and besides, the moving parts on the disk drive aren’t well suited to the bumps of daily travel. Can you read the WSJ on your MacBook at any random spot in the city? Probably not; it works fine at home or the coffee shop, maybe, but you’re pretty limited to where you can connect.

    With the 3G option on the iPad, it truly becomes a computer you can (and actually might) take everywhere, and it’ll have an Internet connection everywhere, as well (with the usual caveat about AT&T’s coverage). I think that’s the most interesting thing about this device. If you only want to use it at home, then it is probably worse than a laptop.

    But for a person like me who rides the bus daily, it’s a rather interesting concept (not that I’m likely to get one anytime soon). I’ve seen people trying to use laptops on the bus, and it doesn’t really work, for several reasons.

    But it all depends on how you use the Internet. For some people, the iPhone does the same thing for just as well (plus makes phone calls). We’ll see.

  • Larry

    No, it won’t kill kindle. It also won’t save journalism, only good journalism could do that and whatever mainstream media like the New York Times is, good journalism it isn’t. No I don’t want one, and I’m not going to get one. I don’t need yet another bulky device to lug about with me, or more likely leave gathering dust on my desk at home since if I can’t shove it in my pocket it’s not likely to come with me everywhere. Any decent smart phone can double as an e-reader, I read books all the time on my Blackberry. I have a couple of hundred on it in reserve in case I’m trapped in an elevator or something.

  • Larry

    No, it won’t kill kindle. It also won’t save journalism, only good journalism could do that and whatever mainstream media like the New York Times is, good journalism it isn’t. No I don’t want one, and I’m not going to get one. I don’t need yet another bulky device to lug about with me, or more likely leave gathering dust on my desk at home since if I can’t shove it in my pocket it’s not likely to come with me everywhere. Any decent smart phone can double as an e-reader, I read books all the time on my Blackberry. I have a couple of hundred on it in reserve in case I’m trapped in an elevator or something.

  • Joe

    tODD@18 – your point about the 3G capability is a good one – I have under appriciated that point. Thanks for pointing that out.

    “Do you take your MacBook everywhere you go?” other than church, kids sporting events and into a swimming pool, I take it everywhere that I could take an iPad. I am lawyer – litigator specifically and have to be able to work from pretty much anywhere.

    What is your opinion of the convertable laptop/tablets? I think Apple shoudl make one. I am pretty sure I would buy it. The iPad is a 1.5 lbs. so I don’t see a huge weight issue (convertable laptop/tablets seem to be in the 2lbs. to 4lbs. range).

    I was also told that the lingo is developing as such:
    Slate: no key board; limited functionality (i.e. iPad)
    Tablet: what I have been calling, convertable laptop/tablet. Anyone else heard this distinction.

  • Joe

    tODD@18 – your point about the 3G capability is a good one – I have under appriciated that point. Thanks for pointing that out.

    “Do you take your MacBook everywhere you go?” other than church, kids sporting events and into a swimming pool, I take it everywhere that I could take an iPad. I am lawyer – litigator specifically and have to be able to work from pretty much anywhere.

    What is your opinion of the convertable laptop/tablets? I think Apple shoudl make one. I am pretty sure I would buy it. The iPad is a 1.5 lbs. so I don’t see a huge weight issue (convertable laptop/tablets seem to be in the 2lbs. to 4lbs. range).

    I was also told that the lingo is developing as such:
    Slate: no key board; limited functionality (i.e. iPad)
    Tablet: what I have been calling, convertable laptop/tablet. Anyone else heard this distinction.

  • http://digitollblog.com Dan

    I couldn’t help but chime in. I wrote an article about the iTampon… er… I mean iPad ;) http://digitollblog.com/emerging-technology/6-ipad-available-with-wings

  • http://digitollblog.com Dan

    I couldn’t help but chime in. I wrote an article about the iTampon… er… I mean iPad ;) http://digitollblog.com/emerging-technology/6-ipad-available-with-wings


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