Who do the Republicans have?

When Americans have to pay $60 to fill their cars up with gas, they usually aren’t going to vote for the incumbent president. And yet, who is there to run against him?

Mitt Romney? Newt Gingrich? Donald Trump? I can’t see Christian conservatives rallying behind any of those guys.

Ron Paul, the libertarian?

Mitch Daniels, who is calling for a truce on cultural issues to focus exclusively on the economy?

Sarah Palin, who for better or worse has been turned into a punchline?

Mike Huckabee, who may be happier as a pundit on Fox News?

Rick Santorum or Tim Pawlenty, but are they too obscure to win?

And do any of these individuals have the gravitas to seem presidential enough (which I’m convinced is a major factor in this era of image over substance) to compete successfully against the actual president?

Are there any potential candidates who might ride in on a dark horse to win this thing?

About Gene Veith

Professor of Literature at Patrick Henry College, the Director of the Cranach Institute at Concordia Theological Seminary, a columnist for World Magazine and TableTalk, and the author of 18 books on different facets of Christianity & Culture.

  • collie

    We need someone who can talk as well as Newt Gingrich, is bold like Donald Trump, handsome like Mitt Romney and likable as Mike Huckabee. hmm

  • collie

    We need someone who can talk as well as Newt Gingrich, is bold like Donald Trump, handsome like Mitt Romney and likable as Mike Huckabee. hmm

  • Michael Lynch

    I’d vote for Elmer Fudd if he ran against Obama.

  • Michael Lynch

    I’d vote for Elmer Fudd if he ran against Obama.

  • Porcell

    The ablest of the potential Republican candidates is Mitch Daniels. He has extensive political/administrative experience in Washington and Indiana as well as top-level business experience with Eli Lily. He knows how to deal effectively with complex fiscal issues and in his own low-key way has a certain charisma.

  • Porcell

    The ablest of the potential Republican candidates is Mitch Daniels. He has extensive political/administrative experience in Washington and Indiana as well as top-level business experience with Eli Lily. He knows how to deal effectively with complex fiscal issues and in his own low-key way has a certain charisma.

  • Jeff

    Obama has got a good chance of winning in 2012, and none of the best Republican candidates want to waste their chance in 2016. Thus, expect to see a lot of 2nd rate Republicans running in 2012.

  • Jeff

    Obama has got a good chance of winning in 2012, and none of the best Republican candidates want to waste their chance in 2016. Thus, expect to see a lot of 2nd rate Republicans running in 2012.

  • Matthew Surburg

    I hate it as much as anyone else when someone posts a link in answer to a question, so I hope you will forgive me this breach of netiquiette. Nevertheless, I had *just* finished reading this article when I switched over to here and saw the question asked about whom the Republicans can field against Obama.

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/morning-jay-gop-looks-strong_558450.html

    I don’t quite understand why Romney is listed as a top-tier candidate, sine his main qualification for the Republican candidacy seems to be (like Dole and McCain) “I’m next in line.” I do wonder, though, if Jeff@4 considers Daniels, Pawlenty, and
    Huntsman to be “2nd rate Republicans,” who would be his starting lineup?

  • Matthew Surburg

    I hate it as much as anyone else when someone posts a link in answer to a question, so I hope you will forgive me this breach of netiquiette. Nevertheless, I had *just* finished reading this article when I switched over to here and saw the question asked about whom the Republicans can field against Obama.

    http://www.weeklystandard.com/blogs/morning-jay-gop-looks-strong_558450.html

    I don’t quite understand why Romney is listed as a top-tier candidate, sine his main qualification for the Republican candidacy seems to be (like Dole and McCain) “I’m next in line.” I do wonder, though, if Jeff@4 considers Daniels, Pawlenty, and
    Huntsman to be “2nd rate Republicans,” who would be his starting lineup?

  • Debbye

    I would love to see NJ Gov. Christie jump in the mix. It’s nonsense for him to wait. Obama had less experience or gravitas than any man who’s ever held the office. At least Gov. Christie has some experience actually governing. As Rush Limbaugh says, Obama is always the least experienced person in whatever room he’s in.

  • Debbye

    I would love to see NJ Gov. Christie jump in the mix. It’s nonsense for him to wait. Obama had less experience or gravitas than any man who’s ever held the office. At least Gov. Christie has some experience actually governing. As Rush Limbaugh says, Obama is always the least experienced person in whatever room he’s in.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    $60 to fill up the gas tank? With my minivan, try $75.

    (OK, maybe $60 in a sedan or minivan with a small gas tank…)

    Mitch Daniels; he’s got what it takes to deal with the current fiscal malaise, and while not wanting to engage the culture wars directly, I can’t see how you start balancing the budget without considering defunding PBS, NPR, Planned Parenthood, the NEA, and so on.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    $60 to fill up the gas tank? With my minivan, try $75.

    (OK, maybe $60 in a sedan or minivan with a small gas tank…)

    Mitch Daniels; he’s got what it takes to deal with the current fiscal malaise, and while not wanting to engage the culture wars directly, I can’t see how you start balancing the budget without considering defunding PBS, NPR, Planned Parenthood, the NEA, and so on.

  • Cincinnatus

    Mitch Daniels seems the most likely and the most competent, but he’s a bit too much of a compromiser for the Tea Party-esque atmosphere infusing the right at the moment. He capitulated to the unions, and he’s “caved” on a couple of social issues. I don’t know how that will wash with significant portions of the Republican base.

  • Cincinnatus

    Mitch Daniels seems the most likely and the most competent, but he’s a bit too much of a compromiser for the Tea Party-esque atmosphere infusing the right at the moment. He capitulated to the unions, and he’s “caved” on a couple of social issues. I don’t know how that will wash with significant portions of the Republican base.

  • LAJ

    Is Michelle Bachmann not worthy of being considered here? I don’t necessarily like her, but she is one of the runners.

  • LAJ

    Is Michelle Bachmann not worthy of being considered here? I don’t necessarily like her, but she is one of the runners.

  • David T.

    Michelle Bachmann, interestingly enough, attended more than one Confessional Lutheran Worldview seminar. I believe Veith spoke at one. I cannot attest to her grasp of theology, but she and several others would stay up late at night at the seminar talking in-depth theology with one of the most astute theologians in our country. She was WELS at the time, though she may have moved to either the LCMS or some non-Lutheran church. She at least has conservative Christian credentials. Some have written her off as having a chance (she is as conservative as they come), but looking at her political history and progress, her tenacity, and knowing her undaunting, fighting spirit, I wonder if the mood in the country over the next several months might not give her a boost.

  • David T.

    Michelle Bachmann, interestingly enough, attended more than one Confessional Lutheran Worldview seminar. I believe Veith spoke at one. I cannot attest to her grasp of theology, but she and several others would stay up late at night at the seminar talking in-depth theology with one of the most astute theologians in our country. She was WELS at the time, though she may have moved to either the LCMS or some non-Lutheran church. She at least has conservative Christian credentials. Some have written her off as having a chance (she is as conservative as they come), but looking at her political history and progress, her tenacity, and knowing her undaunting, fighting spirit, I wonder if the mood in the country over the next several months might not give her a boost.

  • kerner

    I lean towards Mitch Daniels too. He is a lot like Scott Walker and Chris Christie, but he has more experience as a governor, more business experience, and he has federal experience as well.

    I am not really familiar with his stage presence, and I know that means a lot. My understanding is that he is physically short. Obama would tower over him. Some people would take that as a psychological negative. It would take some finesse to turn it into a positive in a substance over show sort of way. You know…vote for the boring but steady tortoise (who you can trust to keep his mind on the race) instead of the flashy hare…that sort of vibe. After 4 years of the man who was going to make the oceans recede and the earth heal, Americans might be ready for the understated but competent Governor of Indiana.

    Also, remember that Bill Clinton was considered a “2nd tier candidate” at a time when George H. W. Bush was considered unbeatable. But things changed.

  • kerner

    I lean towards Mitch Daniels too. He is a lot like Scott Walker and Chris Christie, but he has more experience as a governor, more business experience, and he has federal experience as well.

    I am not really familiar with his stage presence, and I know that means a lot. My understanding is that he is physically short. Obama would tower over him. Some people would take that as a psychological negative. It would take some finesse to turn it into a positive in a substance over show sort of way. You know…vote for the boring but steady tortoise (who you can trust to keep his mind on the race) instead of the flashy hare…that sort of vibe. After 4 years of the man who was going to make the oceans recede and the earth heal, Americans might be ready for the understated but competent Governor of Indiana.

    Also, remember that Bill Clinton was considered a “2nd tier candidate” at a time when George H. W. Bush was considered unbeatable. But things changed.

  • Abby

    For a *really* dark horse, I’ll throw out a name for the future: Justin Amash from Michigan. New, young, excellent, possible future candidate. If he ever wants to try for the position. He votes his principles, even against his own party. And he refuses (so far) to vote for anything he hasn’t read. He has great credentials. Newly elected in the House of Representatives in the seat formerly held by Gerald Ford.

  • Abby

    For a *really* dark horse, I’ll throw out a name for the future: Justin Amash from Michigan. New, young, excellent, possible future candidate. If he ever wants to try for the position. He votes his principles, even against his own party. And he refuses (so far) to vote for anything he hasn’t read. He has great credentials. Newly elected in the House of Representatives in the seat formerly held by Gerald Ford.

  • Greg Smith

    Republicans have no one. NO ONE! At a moment in history where just about anyone should be able to beat the incumbent, we have NO ONE. We need a Reagan.

  • Greg Smith

    Republicans have no one. NO ONE! At a moment in history where just about anyone should be able to beat the incumbent, we have NO ONE. We need a Reagan.

  • kerner

    I like a lot of things about Michelle Bachmann. She stuck to her Lutheran guns about the consequences of unbelief and the identity of the Antichrist. I think these statements came out 5 years ago, but they will be known to everyone if she runs.

    http://comgen.blogspot.com/2011/03/michele-bachmann-religion-wisconsin.html

    I also don’t know how she would do as an executive. She has never had that kind of authority.

  • kerner

    I like a lot of things about Michelle Bachmann. She stuck to her Lutheran guns about the consequences of unbelief and the identity of the Antichrist. I think these statements came out 5 years ago, but they will be known to everyone if she runs.

    http://comgen.blogspot.com/2011/03/michele-bachmann-religion-wisconsin.html

    I also don’t know how she would do as an executive. She has never had that kind of authority.

  • Steve Billingsley

    At this point this is kind of a pointless question. Let’s see what the primary process and the campaign brings. The 1980 election was a referendum on Carter and the 2012 election will be a referendum on Obama. The Republican nominee (whoever he or she is) will have to prove that they are a viable alternative, nothing more. The polls were very close in 1980 until the last couple of weeks when the one and only debate took place just a week before the election (think of that in our day of eternal campaigning and punditry). In that debate Reagan proved that he was a viable alternative, that he wasn’t a trigger-happy cowboy. The undecideds broke for Reagan and the rest is history. The timetable will obviously be different this time, but it is WAY too early to pass judgment on the Republican field.

  • Steve Billingsley

    At this point this is kind of a pointless question. Let’s see what the primary process and the campaign brings. The 1980 election was a referendum on Carter and the 2012 election will be a referendum on Obama. The Republican nominee (whoever he or she is) will have to prove that they are a viable alternative, nothing more. The polls were very close in 1980 until the last couple of weeks when the one and only debate took place just a week before the election (think of that in our day of eternal campaigning and punditry). In that debate Reagan proved that he was a viable alternative, that he wasn’t a trigger-happy cowboy. The undecideds broke for Reagan and the rest is history. The timetable will obviously be different this time, but it is WAY too early to pass judgment on the Republican field.

  • http://scandalizedbygrace.wordpress.com/ Ken Stoll

    My thoughts precisely. Enjoying your blog since stumbling across an article by Pastor Tyler Jones of Raleigh, NC – in which he quoted you.

  • http://scandalizedbygrace.wordpress.com/ Ken Stoll

    My thoughts precisely. Enjoying your blog since stumbling across an article by Pastor Tyler Jones of Raleigh, NC – in which he quoted you.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    What’s wrong with Ron Paul?

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    What’s wrong with Ron Paul?

  • Another Kerner

    NJ Gov. Christie….

    Why wait, Gov Christi?

    We don’t have much time left to turn in a different direction, back to the US Constitution.

  • Another Kerner

    NJ Gov. Christie….

    Why wait, Gov Christi?

    We don’t have much time left to turn in a different direction, back to the US Constitution.

  • Bill Crum

    I think a fiscal conservative could appeal to social conservatives by taking the stance that several Supreme Court rulings consolidating social policy in Washington is bad law. Let the states decide social issues and the laboratories of democracy that are the state houses determine social (and fiscal) policy and those unpleased with their state are free to move to another. One-size-fits-all in Washington doesn’t leave anyone happy.

    That being said… I won’t hold my nose for a GOP nominee in the compassionate conservative lineage. This currently includes Gingrich, Huckabee, Romney, Trump, Santorum, and most of the GOP leadership in the Senate. Any ticket with a combination of Pawlenty, Daniels, Christie, or Walker would have my interest.

    Bachmann, Palin, and Cain fall somewhere in between the four governors I mentioned and the first group that I frown upon. The Pauls and Gary Johnson appeal to my Libertarian streak and may be the most likely to end the military adventurism of the past decade.

    Trump needs to go far away.

  • Bill Crum

    I think a fiscal conservative could appeal to social conservatives by taking the stance that several Supreme Court rulings consolidating social policy in Washington is bad law. Let the states decide social issues and the laboratories of democracy that are the state houses determine social (and fiscal) policy and those unpleased with their state are free to move to another. One-size-fits-all in Washington doesn’t leave anyone happy.

    That being said… I won’t hold my nose for a GOP nominee in the compassionate conservative lineage. This currently includes Gingrich, Huckabee, Romney, Trump, Santorum, and most of the GOP leadership in the Senate. Any ticket with a combination of Pawlenty, Daniels, Christie, or Walker would have my interest.

    Bachmann, Palin, and Cain fall somewhere in between the four governors I mentioned and the first group that I frown upon. The Pauls and Gary Johnson appeal to my Libertarian streak and may be the most likely to end the military adventurism of the past decade.

    Trump needs to go far away.

  • DonS

    As Steve @ 15 said, it’s a little early to panic about not having a candidate. Who would have thought, in April 2007, that Obama would win the presidency in November 2008? And almost every candidate named above is at least as qualified and ready to serve as he was. There are plenty of young, serious, substantive Republicans serving in Congress now who understand the precipice America stands on and what needs to be done to pull back from that cliff.

  • DonS

    As Steve @ 15 said, it’s a little early to panic about not having a candidate. Who would have thought, in April 2007, that Obama would win the presidency in November 2008? And almost every candidate named above is at least as qualified and ready to serve as he was. There are plenty of young, serious, substantive Republicans serving in Congress now who understand the precipice America stands on and what needs to be done to pull back from that cliff.

  • Cincinnatus

    Actually, DonS, I predicted an Obama presidency in 2008 (or 2012 at the latest) as soon as I heard his speech at the Democratic National Convention in 2004.

    So ha! I guess I’ve just proved something. What, exactly, I’m not entirely certain.

  • Cincinnatus

    Actually, DonS, I predicted an Obama presidency in 2008 (or 2012 at the latest) as soon as I heard his speech at the Democratic National Convention in 2004.

    So ha! I guess I’ve just proved something. What, exactly, I’m not entirely certain.

  • DonS

    Really, Cincinnatus? That is incredible :-) I bow down to your prescience. I don’t find that I’m very good at understanding the attraction of supposedly charismatic speakers who spew, in my mind, utter nonsense. For that reason, I miss a lot of trends.

  • DonS

    Really, Cincinnatus? That is incredible :-) I bow down to your prescience. I don’t find that I’m very good at understanding the attraction of supposedly charismatic speakers who spew, in my mind, utter nonsense. For that reason, I miss a lot of trends.

  • L. H. Kevil

    No one has mentioned Rick Perry so far. He has accomplished more for Texas than G. W. Bush had done by the time he became a candidate for the presidency. Pawlenty is a very capable politician suffering from the animosity of the mainstream press. Rick Santorum has some very interesting views outside of his well known cultural ones. The press probably hates him more than any of the others.

  • L. H. Kevil

    No one has mentioned Rick Perry so far. He has accomplished more for Texas than G. W. Bush had done by the time he became a candidate for the presidency. Pawlenty is a very capable politician suffering from the animosity of the mainstream press. Rick Santorum has some very interesting views outside of his well known cultural ones. The press probably hates him more than any of the others.

  • Cincinnatus

    Yes, well, I wasn’t attracted to him myself, but I must have an ear for plebeian seductions or something.

    Anyway, I honestly have no idea who will have the Republican nomination in hand this time next year. This is, as others have noted, the Republicans’ race to lose–there is the whiff of Carterian blood in the air–but the Republicans are a deeply divided (Tea Party vs. social conservatives vs. the Establishment G.O.P.) and widely scattered bunch right now. I don’t know if they’ll be able to muster a candidate with wide enough appeal for the following reason: Tea Party-esque candidates are likely to triumph in the primaries, but the Tea Party definitely does not have the mass appeal to unseat an incumbent–mostly because the Tea Party Republican hopefuls so far are just laughable: Bachmann, Palin, O’Donnell. I wouldn’t even vote for a single one of them, and I share fairly deep Tea Party sympathies.

  • Cincinnatus

    Yes, well, I wasn’t attracted to him myself, but I must have an ear for plebeian seductions or something.

    Anyway, I honestly have no idea who will have the Republican nomination in hand this time next year. This is, as others have noted, the Republicans’ race to lose–there is the whiff of Carterian blood in the air–but the Republicans are a deeply divided (Tea Party vs. social conservatives vs. the Establishment G.O.P.) and widely scattered bunch right now. I don’t know if they’ll be able to muster a candidate with wide enough appeal for the following reason: Tea Party-esque candidates are likely to triumph in the primaries, but the Tea Party definitely does not have the mass appeal to unseat an incumbent–mostly because the Tea Party Republican hopefuls so far are just laughable: Bachmann, Palin, O’Donnell. I wouldn’t even vote for a single one of them, and I share fairly deep Tea Party sympathies.

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Can we just vote for Eddie Haskell?

  • http://enterthevein.wordpress.com J. Dean

    Can we just vote for Eddie Haskell?

  • DonS

    I don’t think O’Donnell is in play. I haven’t heard her name at all, and after her devastating defeat in DE, she has been totally eviscerated.

    I don’t think Palin is going to run, and Bachmann will not be a factor.

    That said, I have no idea WHO will actually emerge. I’m hoping for someone serious. We need serious, and I’m hoping the American people realize that, and the peril we are in.

  • DonS

    I don’t think O’Donnell is in play. I haven’t heard her name at all, and after her devastating defeat in DE, she has been totally eviscerated.

    I don’t think Palin is going to run, and Bachmann will not be a factor.

    That said, I have no idea WHO will actually emerge. I’m hoping for someone serious. We need serious, and I’m hoping the American people realize that, and the peril we are in.

  • Another Kerner

    However widely scattered Republicans/libertarians/social conservatives et al appear to be, there is a vast number of voting individuals who come from that ever increasing block of those who think “anyone but Obama”.

    Whilst I believe that Gov. Christie is the most “electable” right now, there are others who, if they would get into the race, could prove to be outstanding candidates.

    For instance, Marco Rubio of Florida.

    Cincinnatus is not alone in Wisconsin who saw Obama as a challenge.

    We have an open primary in this swing state.
    I (and perhaps other Kerners) voted in the Democratic primary for Hillary Clinton, hoping to stop Obama earlier on.

    Since voters in the Badger State are able to cross party lines and vote in whichever primary interests them most, we sometimes exhibit peculiar statistics.

    Alas, then Republicans nominated John McCain.

  • Another Kerner

    However widely scattered Republicans/libertarians/social conservatives et al appear to be, there is a vast number of voting individuals who come from that ever increasing block of those who think “anyone but Obama”.

    Whilst I believe that Gov. Christie is the most “electable” right now, there are others who, if they would get into the race, could prove to be outstanding candidates.

    For instance, Marco Rubio of Florida.

    Cincinnatus is not alone in Wisconsin who saw Obama as a challenge.

    We have an open primary in this swing state.
    I (and perhaps other Kerners) voted in the Democratic primary for Hillary Clinton, hoping to stop Obama earlier on.

    Since voters in the Badger State are able to cross party lines and vote in whichever primary interests them most, we sometimes exhibit peculiar statistics.

    Alas, then Republicans nominated John McCain.

  • collie

    My son told me about an article he read that asserted people vote for the most likable candidate, this trumping all other personal characteristics and even campaign cash advantage by the opponent. It sounds reasonable, but I would have to add another one: the ability to talk, and do it well. (maybe this is a factor, no doubt, of likability). And also to argue and stand your ground, without sounding grouchy or judgemental. I think Chris Christie has these things, but he probably won’t run for a couple of reasons; New Jersey needs him and he probably needs more executive experience before he takes the presidential plunge. He might be an excellent mentor or coach, though.

    Note to Republicans: do not nominate someone who cannot talk. I kind of believe the idea that presidential elections are determined and tipped either right or left by the 1- Independents and 2- Those too busy or uninterested to follow politics. The second group will be influenced by soundbites. Any nominee has got to have excellent communication skills, along with a whimsical manner, if possible. They have got to be excellent in this category, in my opinion.

    Wish I knew who that would be -

  • collie

    My son told me about an article he read that asserted people vote for the most likable candidate, this trumping all other personal characteristics and even campaign cash advantage by the opponent. It sounds reasonable, but I would have to add another one: the ability to talk, and do it well. (maybe this is a factor, no doubt, of likability). And also to argue and stand your ground, without sounding grouchy or judgemental. I think Chris Christie has these things, but he probably won’t run for a couple of reasons; New Jersey needs him and he probably needs more executive experience before he takes the presidential plunge. He might be an excellent mentor or coach, though.

    Note to Republicans: do not nominate someone who cannot talk. I kind of believe the idea that presidential elections are determined and tipped either right or left by the 1- Independents and 2- Those too busy or uninterested to follow politics. The second group will be influenced by soundbites. Any nominee has got to have excellent communication skills, along with a whimsical manner, if possible. They have got to be excellent in this category, in my opinion.

    Wish I knew who that would be -

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Well, this thread is about as coherent as the field itself. But the talk about “anyone but Obama” and the obvious splits between the party establishment and more activist wings does have me pretty convinced that, whatever his or her name ends up actually being, we can all think of him as 2012′s John Kerry.

  • http://www.toddstadler.com/ tODD

    Well, this thread is about as coherent as the field itself. But the talk about “anyone but Obama” and the obvious splits between the party establishment and more activist wings does have me pretty convinced that, whatever his or her name ends up actually being, we can all think of him as 2012′s John Kerry.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Perhaps more of all of us should vote a whole different party this time.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    Perhaps more of all of us should vote a whole different party this time.

  • Porcell

    The truth is that Obama is political toast. Americans understand that leading from behind in international affairs is a disgrace; further that Obama is playing politics and not leading on the crucial fiscal issues. He won in 2008 due to his Black/Latino base plus the fervent liberals along with swinging the crucial independents, about two-thirds of whom ow oppose him. He can’t win without an independent majority.

    I’m confident that the Republicans will find the right candidate. Back in 1979 they picked Reagan whom many Democrats regarded as an intellectually challenged Grade B movie actor.

    The ludicrous assertion that the 2012 Republican candidate will be the next Kerry, ignores the reality that not one of them comes close to having the arrogance and phoniness of Kerry.

  • Porcell

    The truth is that Obama is political toast. Americans understand that leading from behind in international affairs is a disgrace; further that Obama is playing politics and not leading on the crucial fiscal issues. He won in 2008 due to his Black/Latino base plus the fervent liberals along with swinging the crucial independents, about two-thirds of whom ow oppose him. He can’t win without an independent majority.

    I’m confident that the Republicans will find the right candidate. Back in 1979 they picked Reagan whom many Democrats regarded as an intellectually challenged Grade B movie actor.

    The ludicrous assertion that the 2012 Republican candidate will be the next Kerry, ignores the reality that not one of them comes close to having the arrogance and phoniness of Kerry.

  • Cincinnatus

    I don’t know, Porcell: I would submit Romney as someone possibly approaching “the arrogance and phoniness of Kerry.” He was, after all, for a lot of things before he was against them. And that hair…

  • Cincinnatus

    I don’t know, Porcell: I would submit Romney as someone possibly approaching “the arrogance and phoniness of Kerry.” He was, after all, for a lot of things before he was against them. And that hair…

  • Another Kerner

    Never mind the hair, Cincinnatus.

    Rommey is his father’s son.

  • Another Kerner

    Never mind the hair, Cincinnatus.

    Rommey is his father’s son.

  • Jerry

    There is an extremely large number of persons more qualified than the current President to do that job. However, the problem is that the majority of the press in this country never want to see another Ronald Reagan; it’s their worst nightmare. Accordingly, they will ruthlessly attack anyone who gives a Reaganesque appearance. It would take someone sufficiently crazy and who feels they have nothing to lose to attempt to run for president as a conservative under those conditions.

  • Jerry

    There is an extremely large number of persons more qualified than the current President to do that job. However, the problem is that the majority of the press in this country never want to see another Ronald Reagan; it’s their worst nightmare. Accordingly, they will ruthlessly attack anyone who gives a Reaganesque appearance. It would take someone sufficiently crazy and who feels they have nothing to lose to attempt to run for president as a conservative under those conditions.

  • Cincinnatus

    Jerry, that’s a fine conspiratorial hypothesis, but it seems to predetermine the conclusion, and it presupposes in the first place that there is a Reaganesque figure within or just beyond sight. Of this Reaganesque figure who will be savaged by the media I am totally ignorant. Who is he/she? Are there any plausible Reagans out there?

  • Cincinnatus

    Jerry, that’s a fine conspiratorial hypothesis, but it seems to predetermine the conclusion, and it presupposes in the first place that there is a Reaganesque figure within or just beyond sight. Of this Reaganesque figure who will be savaged by the media I am totally ignorant. Who is he/she? Are there any plausible Reagans out there?

  • Porcell

    Cincinnatus, Romney, while a bit cold and stiff on the surface, is far from arrogant. True, in order to win a Massachusetts governorship he had to fudge on some issues, though unlike Kerry he was a very successful businessman and an accomplished governor in Massachusetts, despite the health care issue.

    Romney knows how to govern unlike Obama and Kerry who talk a good game but are clueless on serious government. While I favor Daniels, Romney ,also, would be an effective president.

  • Porcell

    Cincinnatus, Romney, while a bit cold and stiff on the surface, is far from arrogant. True, in order to win a Massachusetts governorship he had to fudge on some issues, though unlike Kerry he was a very successful businessman and an accomplished governor in Massachusetts, despite the health care issue.

    Romney knows how to govern unlike Obama and Kerry who talk a good game but are clueless on serious government. While I favor Daniels, Romney ,also, would be an effective president.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    I might vote for Obama if he were the only choice against Romney.

    As a Utahn, I would consider voting for Huntsman.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    I might vote for Obama if he were the only choice against Romney.

    As a Utahn, I would consider voting for Huntsman.

  • Bryan Lindemood

    An Obama, Romney contest would be wonderful for Ron Paul!

  • Bryan Lindemood

    An Obama, Romney contest would be wonderful for Ron Paul!

  • helen

    Kevil @ 23
    No one has mentioned Rick Perry so far. He has accomplished more for Texas than G. W. Bush had done by the time he became a candidate for the presidency.

    Since Dubya (up to that time) had a talent for coming out smelling like money while his friends and fellow investors ended up in the red, that isn’t saying a whole lot!

    Just now Perry is working hard to move Texas education from #47 to #51.
    What he would do for the country, besides put Aggies in all the top positions and deep six anyone who dared to disagree with him, (or support anyone who disagreed with him) I cannot tell you.
    I believe his main claim to fame is that the Supreme Court elected Dubya President in 2000, which moved him up from Lt. Governor. :) Sometime prior to that, he was a Democrat. (Does that make him “Reaganesque”?)

    [But I'm always going against the grain here, aren't I!] ;)

  • helen

    Kevil @ 23
    No one has mentioned Rick Perry so far. He has accomplished more for Texas than G. W. Bush had done by the time he became a candidate for the presidency.

    Since Dubya (up to that time) had a talent for coming out smelling like money while his friends and fellow investors ended up in the red, that isn’t saying a whole lot!

    Just now Perry is working hard to move Texas education from #47 to #51.
    What he would do for the country, besides put Aggies in all the top positions and deep six anyone who dared to disagree with him, (or support anyone who disagreed with him) I cannot tell you.
    I believe his main claim to fame is that the Supreme Court elected Dubya President in 2000, which moved him up from Lt. Governor. :) Sometime prior to that, he was a Democrat. (Does that make him “Reaganesque”?)

    [But I'm always going against the grain here, aren't I!] ;)

  • Another Kerner

    Bryan at #38

    Ron Paul would take votes from Rommney and, as a result, may elect Obama again.

    We have had three candidate races for President often enough in modern history to observe that such contests often elect the candidate belonging to the party which is not split.

  • Another Kerner

    Bryan at #38

    Ron Paul would take votes from Rommney and, as a result, may elect Obama again.

    We have had three candidate races for President often enough in modern history to observe that such contests often elect the candidate belonging to the party which is not split.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Just in case anyone reading this blog thinks that it is only for Conservative Republicans, I feel compelled to state the following:

    I am a Democrat, and I am going to vote for Obama in 2012. Hey, that felt good!

    I also predict that since all but four Republicans in the House voted for Ryan’s plan to end Medicare as we know it, and replace it with a voucher system to purchase private health insurance; that as a result, not only will Obama win the re-election but that the Democrats will keep control of the Senate and re-gain control of the House.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Just in case anyone reading this blog thinks that it is only for Conservative Republicans, I feel compelled to state the following:

    I am a Democrat, and I am going to vote for Obama in 2012. Hey, that felt good!

    I also predict that since all but four Republicans in the House voted for Ryan’s plan to end Medicare as we know it, and replace it with a voucher system to purchase private health insurance; that as a result, not only will Obama win the re-election but that the Democrats will keep control of the Senate and re-gain control of the House.

  • Grace

    Jimmy – 41

    Why would you vote for Obama? .. just because he’s a Democrat?

  • Grace

    Jimmy – 41

    Why would you vote for Obama? .. just because he’s a Democrat?

  • ‘Ski

    I still predict a Trump/Palin ticket.
    The slogan? “You’re fired! I quit!”

    2012 should be remarkably bad for the GOP, which is chasing the dying demographic of old white men who are appalled that a black man got himself elected president. To survive, the party’s got to appeal to young and middle aged Latinos and African Americans. Good luck with that.

  • ‘Ski

    I still predict a Trump/Palin ticket.
    The slogan? “You’re fired! I quit!”

    2012 should be remarkably bad for the GOP, which is chasing the dying demographic of old white men who are appalled that a black man got himself elected president. To survive, the party’s got to appeal to young and middle aged Latinos and African Americans. Good luck with that.

  • Cincinnatus

    ‘Ski, that was a remarkably funny impersonation of a typical poster on the forums at Democrat Underground! Are you available for weddings and bar mitzvahs?

    But seriously. That was a really stupid characterization of the Republican party, and a really banal use of the race card. Lived in the deep South during the 2008 election; don’t know a single person who voted against Obama because he’s black.

  • Cincinnatus

    ‘Ski, that was a remarkably funny impersonation of a typical poster on the forums at Democrat Underground! Are you available for weddings and bar mitzvahs?

    But seriously. That was a really stupid characterization of the Republican party, and a really banal use of the race card. Lived in the deep South during the 2008 election; don’t know a single person who voted against Obama because he’s black.

  • ‘Ski

    Cin, did I touch a nerve? But had you said, “Lived in the deep South during the 2008 election; don’t know a single person who [admitted to having] voted against Obama because he’s black,” I might have believed you.

    A good 30-40% of GOP voters are ‘birthers,’ and you think my description of the party as racially challenged was stupid?

  • ‘Ski

    Cin, did I touch a nerve? But had you said, “Lived in the deep South during the 2008 election; don’t know a single person who [admitted to having] voted against Obama because he’s black,” I might have believed you.

    A good 30-40% of GOP voters are ‘birthers,’ and you think my description of the party as racially challenged was stupid?

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Comment 43 reminds me of a joke from Chicago;

    What do you call an elevator filled with Poles?

    A Ski lift!

    OK, sorry, couldn’t resist. I tend to agree with commenters who note that whoever is elected must be a communicator, and I further suggest that all the GOP needs is someone with a decent speaking voice who doesn’t need cues from a teleprompter.

  • http://www.bikebubba.blogspot.com Bike Bubba

    Comment 43 reminds me of a joke from Chicago;

    What do you call an elevator filled with Poles?

    A Ski lift!

    OK, sorry, couldn’t resist. I tend to agree with commenters who note that whoever is elected must be a communicator, and I further suggest that all the GOP needs is someone with a decent speaking voice who doesn’t need cues from a teleprompter.

  • Cincinnatus

    ‘Ski,

    And fully 33% of Democrats believe that George Bush orchestrated the 9/11 attacks. A substantial number of Democrats (and Republicans, of course) believe Obama is a Muslim.

    What’s your point? I think there’s enough stupidity and bigotry in the rank and file of both parties to go around.

    You didn’t “touch a nerve,” as there’s no nerve to be touched: I’m not a Republican. But commenters like you just appear delightfully amusing? blinkered? confused? when you dash into an otherwise cordial and intellectual conversation like this one unannounced. This isn’t YouTube or wherever you usually comment.

  • Cincinnatus

    ‘Ski,

    And fully 33% of Democrats believe that George Bush orchestrated the 9/11 attacks. A substantial number of Democrats (and Republicans, of course) believe Obama is a Muslim.

    What’s your point? I think there’s enough stupidity and bigotry in the rank and file of both parties to go around.

    You didn’t “touch a nerve,” as there’s no nerve to be touched: I’m not a Republican. But commenters like you just appear delightfully amusing? blinkered? confused? when you dash into an otherwise cordial and intellectual conversation like this one unannounced. This isn’t YouTube or wherever you usually comment.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To Grace @42:

    1. I support his health care reform bill. When fully implemented, it will prevent health insurance companies from denying people coverage for pre-existing conditions and will go a long ways towards moving us towards universal coverage. Although more will be need to control medical costs in the future, this was a good and necessary first step.
    2. I support the economic stimulus bill including the so-called “bailout” of the auto industry. By taking these bold and decisive actions, he prevented the economy from sliding into a depression.
    3. I support the START treaty, and I believe that he has shown good judgment in matters of foreign policy.
    4. I support the “Race to the Top” program which has stimulated education reform at the local level in a very cost effective manner.
    5. I support the Wall-Street reform legislation which will help prevent the kind of recession that began in September of 2008.
    6. I think his plans to reduce the federal deficit is more responsible that that of Paul Ryan. Although I personally would support a greater reduction in the military budget as we end the wars in Iraq and Afganistan, I do agree with the concept of shared sacrifice and that individuals with income in excess of $250,000.00 should pay at the tax rates we had during the Clinton administration.

    These are my positive reasons for supporting Obama for a second term. However, I am also motivated by the fact that he does not support the policies of the Republican Party, which been taken over by right wing ideologues, who persist in continuing the policy of “supply side” economics which has been proven to be a complete failure by the previous administration. Also, the Republican Party has embraced Ryan’s plan to end Medicare as we know it while giving even bigger tax breaks for millionaires. This is completely insane.

    In short, I believe that he is a very thoughtful, analytical and a pragmatic individual and I trust his judgment. I also share his basic idea that the long term health of our economy is dependent upon a strong middle class and I think that he will do everything in his power to strengthen the middle class in his next term.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To Grace @42:

    1. I support his health care reform bill. When fully implemented, it will prevent health insurance companies from denying people coverage for pre-existing conditions and will go a long ways towards moving us towards universal coverage. Although more will be need to control medical costs in the future, this was a good and necessary first step.
    2. I support the economic stimulus bill including the so-called “bailout” of the auto industry. By taking these bold and decisive actions, he prevented the economy from sliding into a depression.
    3. I support the START treaty, and I believe that he has shown good judgment in matters of foreign policy.
    4. I support the “Race to the Top” program which has stimulated education reform at the local level in a very cost effective manner.
    5. I support the Wall-Street reform legislation which will help prevent the kind of recession that began in September of 2008.
    6. I think his plans to reduce the federal deficit is more responsible that that of Paul Ryan. Although I personally would support a greater reduction in the military budget as we end the wars in Iraq and Afganistan, I do agree with the concept of shared sacrifice and that individuals with income in excess of $250,000.00 should pay at the tax rates we had during the Clinton administration.

    These are my positive reasons for supporting Obama for a second term. However, I am also motivated by the fact that he does not support the policies of the Republican Party, which been taken over by right wing ideologues, who persist in continuing the policy of “supply side” economics which has been proven to be a complete failure by the previous administration. Also, the Republican Party has embraced Ryan’s plan to end Medicare as we know it while giving even bigger tax breaks for millionaires. This is completely insane.

    In short, I believe that he is a very thoughtful, analytical and a pragmatic individual and I trust his judgment. I also share his basic idea that the long term health of our economy is dependent upon a strong middle class and I think that he will do everything in his power to strengthen the middle class in his next term.

  • ‘Ski

    Cin, you’re plainly a woman who likes good manners, so I hope you’ll excuse me. I suppose I could have just said that I predicted Trump Palin. The line after that wrote itself.

  • ‘Ski

    Cin, you’re plainly a woman who likes good manners, so I hope you’ll excuse me. I suppose I could have just said that I predicted Trump Palin. The line after that wrote itself.

  • Cincinnatus

    k, I’ll stop feeding the troll now.

  • Cincinnatus

    k, I’ll stop feeding the troll now.

  • DonS

    I appreciate Jimmy’s thoughtful and thorough explanation of what he likes about President Obama, and why he intends to vote for his re-election, @ 48, even though I disagree. Quite a contrast to the lightweight and racially insulting comments made by one Mr. or Ms. ‘Ski @ 43, 45. So, in ‘Ski’s view, apparently, middle-aged Latinos and African Americans are incapable of considering ideas thoughtfully put forward, and are thus doomed to just continue monolithically voting the Democratic party line, no matter whether it brings the country to ruin or not. I disagree. Movement is already being seen in the polling among racial minority groups, and it doesn’t take much of a shift from the skewed 2008 numbers to make a big difference in election outcomes.

    As for 2012, it is shaping up to be a strong Republican year. Almost certainly, Republicans will re-take the Senate, as the electoral map favors them fairly strongly, and they are running strong candidates for open seats. I don’t see going Democratic with a Democratic president running, not to mention ridiculous gas prices and a continued failed economy, with a government still intent on throwing roadblocks to recovery rather than assisting it.

    As for Medicare, the Republican budget does not provide a voucher plan. That was an old Ryan proposal, but not in the budget. Instead, it calls for no changes for those presently 55 and older, and guaranteed premium subsidies for those under 55. The big change is a move away from guaranteed benefits. The thinking behind this change is that by putting the consumer more in charge of health care purchasing decisions, an initial layer of necessary cost control will be provided. Those who claim that this change would put the risk on beneficiaries if health care inflation continues to far outpace CPI are ignoring the fact that everyone’s health care is at risk ANYWAY in such an event. For we are the government, and there is no way we can continue to guarantee such benefits if costs aren’t brought under control. It is demagoguery on the part of the usual interest groups and political strategists, as usual.

  • DonS

    I appreciate Jimmy’s thoughtful and thorough explanation of what he likes about President Obama, and why he intends to vote for his re-election, @ 48, even though I disagree. Quite a contrast to the lightweight and racially insulting comments made by one Mr. or Ms. ‘Ski @ 43, 45. So, in ‘Ski’s view, apparently, middle-aged Latinos and African Americans are incapable of considering ideas thoughtfully put forward, and are thus doomed to just continue monolithically voting the Democratic party line, no matter whether it brings the country to ruin or not. I disagree. Movement is already being seen in the polling among racial minority groups, and it doesn’t take much of a shift from the skewed 2008 numbers to make a big difference in election outcomes.

    As for 2012, it is shaping up to be a strong Republican year. Almost certainly, Republicans will re-take the Senate, as the electoral map favors them fairly strongly, and they are running strong candidates for open seats. I don’t see going Democratic with a Democratic president running, not to mention ridiculous gas prices and a continued failed economy, with a government still intent on throwing roadblocks to recovery rather than assisting it.

    As for Medicare, the Republican budget does not provide a voucher plan. That was an old Ryan proposal, but not in the budget. Instead, it calls for no changes for those presently 55 and older, and guaranteed premium subsidies for those under 55. The big change is a move away from guaranteed benefits. The thinking behind this change is that by putting the consumer more in charge of health care purchasing decisions, an initial layer of necessary cost control will be provided. Those who claim that this change would put the risk on beneficiaries if health care inflation continues to far outpace CPI are ignoring the fact that everyone’s health care is at risk ANYWAY in such an event. For we are the government, and there is no way we can continue to guarantee such benefits if costs aren’t brought under control. It is demagoguery on the part of the usual interest groups and political strategists, as usual.

  • DonS

    “I don’t see going Democratic” in my post @ 51 should be “I don’t see the House going Democratic”

  • DonS

    “I don’t see going Democratic” in my post @ 51 should be “I don’t see the House going Democratic”

  • Cincinnatus

    And, against the claim that voters will abandon Republicans due to Paul Ryan’s budget plan, see the following:

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/42821086

  • SKPeterson

    Actually – old white me still vote. Young blacks and latinos don’t. Maybe Obama can draw them out, but he’s not exactly living up to the hype. This is a very ho hum election. I’ve stated this before, but ideally we get another Obama presidency with a Republican Senate and House. If Ryan can stick to his guns and have Boehner keep a dry eye, along with somebody with backbone in the Senate (Paul?) we may have serious reductions in government. If we get a Republican presidency along with a House and Senate, we can probably kiss the Tea Party goodbye as an effective political force and we’ll be right back into the go-go spending bender days of Obama-Bush II.

  • Cincinnatus

    And, against the claim that voters will abandon Republicans due to Paul Ryan’s budget plan, see the following:

    http://www.cnbc.com/id/42821086

  • SKPeterson

    Actually – old white me still vote. Young blacks and latinos don’t. Maybe Obama can draw them out, but he’s not exactly living up to the hype. This is a very ho hum election. I’ve stated this before, but ideally we get another Obama presidency with a Republican Senate and House. If Ryan can stick to his guns and have Boehner keep a dry eye, along with somebody with backbone in the Senate (Paul?) we may have serious reductions in government. If we get a Republican presidency along with a House and Senate, we can probably kiss the Tea Party goodbye as an effective political force and we’ll be right back into the go-go spending bender days of Obama-Bush II.

  • SKPeterson

    old white men, old white men. Sheesh.

  • SKPeterson

    old white men, old white men. Sheesh.

  • Cincinnatus

    SKPeterson: Great point. A mixed/divided government is historically better for the budget, and the combination of a Democratic President juxtaposed against a solidly Republican Congress (both houses) has proven as close to ideal on this issue as American politics are likely to get–witness Clinton and welfare reform.

  • Cincinnatus

    SKPeterson: Great point. A mixed/divided government is historically better for the budget, and the combination of a Democratic President juxtaposed against a solidly Republican Congress (both houses) has proven as close to ideal on this issue as American politics are likely to get–witness Clinton and welfare reform.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To Ski @43. Very Funny! I agree with your comments.

    Just because this blog is dominated by Conservative Republicans, don’t think for a minute that you don’t belong. Your comments were perfectly appropriate and you need to keep it up.

  • Jimmy Veith

    To Ski @43. Very Funny! I agree with your comments.

    Just because this blog is dominated by Conservative Republicans, don’t think for a minute that you don’t belong. Your comments were perfectly appropriate and you need to keep it up.

  • Cincinnatus

    Really, Jimmy? See, I think I can draw a qualitative distinction between your partisan comment–which was civil, thoughtful, and articulate–and ‘Ski’s–which was base, offensive, and shallow. I welcome the former; the latter can please to not allow the virtual door to contact his posterior on the way out.

  • Cincinnatus

    Really, Jimmy? See, I think I can draw a qualitative distinction between your partisan comment–which was civil, thoughtful, and articulate–and ‘Ski’s–which was base, offensive, and shallow. I welcome the former; the latter can please to not allow the virtual door to contact his posterior on the way out.

  • ‘Ski

    Cin, you’re in a mood tonight.

    All I did was make the ridiculously obvious (base, offensive and shallow though it may have been) point that the GOP needs to keep up with demographic changes if it wants to win national elections. But that’s a huge order. The “Southern strategy” its lived on since 1966 has run its course, though, as SKPeterson wisely noted, old white men do like to vote, often in hellacious numbers.

    But they don’t live forever, and I think that the 60+ generation of white folk, which never really got in step with the civil rights movement, will have to pass on in greater numbers before we start seeing the kind of change the US needs. Not that I’m wishing for them to pass on! No. I’d be perfectly happy if we could get more people to vote against them.

    Jimmy Veith, thanks for speaking your mind.

  • ‘Ski

    Cin, you’re in a mood tonight.

    All I did was make the ridiculously obvious (base, offensive and shallow though it may have been) point that the GOP needs to keep up with demographic changes if it wants to win national elections. But that’s a huge order. The “Southern strategy” its lived on since 1966 has run its course, though, as SKPeterson wisely noted, old white men do like to vote, often in hellacious numbers.

    But they don’t live forever, and I think that the 60+ generation of white folk, which never really got in step with the civil rights movement, will have to pass on in greater numbers before we start seeing the kind of change the US needs. Not that I’m wishing for them to pass on! No. I’d be perfectly happy if we could get more people to vote against them.

    Jimmy Veith, thanks for speaking your mind.

  • DonS

    Jimmy @ 57:

    2012 should be remarkably bad for the GOP, which is chasing the dying demographic of old white men who are appalled that a black man got himself elected president.

    What’s funny about that? If true, it would be sad. Otherwise, it’s offensive. But it’s not funny.

  • DonS

    Jimmy @ 57:

    2012 should be remarkably bad for the GOP, which is chasing the dying demographic of old white men who are appalled that a black man got himself elected president.

    What’s funny about that? If true, it would be sad. Otherwise, it’s offensive. But it’s not funny.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Cincinnatus @ 58.

    Thanks for the compliment. I thought her comment concerning the Trump/Palin ticket slogan: “You’re fired! I quit!” was mildly amusing.

    The fact that the Republican party has a problem appealing to Latinos and African Americans is simply a statement of fact. This has been pointed out by Republican pollsters, who have warned them that this trend does not bode well for the future of the Republican Party. I don’t think the Republican Pollsters were playing the “race card”.

    I don’t think that all, or even a majority of Republicans, are racist. However, I don’t think that we can ignore the role of racism in politics. During the 2008 campaign, as I tried to convince my friends to vote for Obama, I was stopped in my tracks when one of my friends said: “I am sorry, I just don’t want to have a black person to be our President”. That was certainly a conversation stopper. (She may have said that because she was sick of my campaigning, but I think she was sincere in her comment.)

    I agree that it does not help the conversation if Obama supporters play the “race card” when they are engaged in a conversation with someone who opposes Obama’s policies. However, when people attack Obama on a personal level, such as the “birthers”, implying that he is not one of us, I can’t help but think that there may be an element of racism.

  • Jimmy Veith

    Cincinnatus @ 58.

    Thanks for the compliment. I thought her comment concerning the Trump/Palin ticket slogan: “You’re fired! I quit!” was mildly amusing.

    The fact that the Republican party has a problem appealing to Latinos and African Americans is simply a statement of fact. This has been pointed out by Republican pollsters, who have warned them that this trend does not bode well for the future of the Republican Party. I don’t think the Republican Pollsters were playing the “race card”.

    I don’t think that all, or even a majority of Republicans, are racist. However, I don’t think that we can ignore the role of racism in politics. During the 2008 campaign, as I tried to convince my friends to vote for Obama, I was stopped in my tracks when one of my friends said: “I am sorry, I just don’t want to have a black person to be our President”. That was certainly a conversation stopper. (She may have said that because she was sick of my campaigning, but I think she was sincere in her comment.)

    I agree that it does not help the conversation if Obama supporters play the “race card” when they are engaged in a conversation with someone who opposes Obama’s policies. However, when people attack Obama on a personal level, such as the “birthers”, implying that he is not one of us, I can’t help but think that there may be an element of racism.

  • WisdomLover

    The Republicans cannot run Bachman or Paul for the simple reason that they’ve never run anything. We already have a President who’s never run anything.

    We need a governor.

    Pawlenty and Daniels are obscure, but so was Clinton at this point. Pawlenty also has a funny name, which is OK if you’re the ONE, but not for a RWG. Both are a little bit boring. That’s worse than being obscure. Both have been effective governors. Both are solid conservatives. Pawlenty, at least, seems pretty likable in a low-key way.

    Christie is full of awesomeness on fiscal and bureaucratic issues. But social conservatives won’t get behind him.

    Romney is pretty good on most things but awesome in none. And then there’s the Mormon thing, which shouldn’t matter, but does.

    He’ll have to do an excellent job in explaining Romneycare. It’s possible to do that. There are (or were) important differences between Romneycare and Obamacare that make the one palatable and the other not. And, insofar as Romneycare has failed in Massachusetts, that might easily be the result of later tampering by the leftists who dominate the state.

    On the plus side, right now we need someone we can trust with the economy. Romney definitely gets gold stars there. I just wish we’d had him last time when the banking crisis hit. Instead we had McCain, who appeared to go a bit unhinged. Romney would have pwned Obama on that issue.

    This business angle also favors Trump. But he’ll never get past the social conservatives. And he just had the rug pulled out from underneath him with the Birth Certificate reveal. The rug on top of him seems to still be in place.

    Huckabee and Palin are not going to be issues. I don’t think Huckabee wants to run, and he was not a great governor. I also think that his spiteful performance against Romney last time makes him poison. Palin has a lot going for her objectively, but the press has damaged her almost beyond repair.

    In short, not one of the usual suspects is a great choice, but Romney, Pawlenty and Daniels seem to be good choices who could win. Obama is very weak, so as far as electoral strategy goes, it may not matter which of the three gets the nod.

    I think that an effective and charismatic governor or former governor might still step forward.

    Depending on how his older brother’s image develops in the next several months, I don’t think it’s absurd to consider Jeb Bush. As we gain more distance from the Bush Presidency, people are viewing him more favorably. I doubt that Dubya’s image will be sufficiently rehabilitated in time for Jeb to make a successful run in 2012. But there’s an outside chance. Were it not for his brother’s negatives, Jeb would be a very good candidate.

    Texas Governor Rick Perry is also someone who might have the charisma, toughness, platform and record to make a run. He was in the thick of the Tea Party movement. Some people might view his secession comments to be damning.

  • WisdomLover

    The Republicans cannot run Bachman or Paul for the simple reason that they’ve never run anything. We already have a President who’s never run anything.

    We need a governor.

    Pawlenty and Daniels are obscure, but so was Clinton at this point. Pawlenty also has a funny name, which is OK if you’re the ONE, but not for a RWG. Both are a little bit boring. That’s worse than being obscure. Both have been effective governors. Both are solid conservatives. Pawlenty, at least, seems pretty likable in a low-key way.

    Christie is full of awesomeness on fiscal and bureaucratic issues. But social conservatives won’t get behind him.

    Romney is pretty good on most things but awesome in none. And then there’s the Mormon thing, which shouldn’t matter, but does.

    He’ll have to do an excellent job in explaining Romneycare. It’s possible to do that. There are (or were) important differences between Romneycare and Obamacare that make the one palatable and the other not. And, insofar as Romneycare has failed in Massachusetts, that might easily be the result of later tampering by the leftists who dominate the state.

    On the plus side, right now we need someone we can trust with the economy. Romney definitely gets gold stars there. I just wish we’d had him last time when the banking crisis hit. Instead we had McCain, who appeared to go a bit unhinged. Romney would have pwned Obama on that issue.

    This business angle also favors Trump. But he’ll never get past the social conservatives. And he just had the rug pulled out from underneath him with the Birth Certificate reveal. The rug on top of him seems to still be in place.

    Huckabee and Palin are not going to be issues. I don’t think Huckabee wants to run, and he was not a great governor. I also think that his spiteful performance against Romney last time makes him poison. Palin has a lot going for her objectively, but the press has damaged her almost beyond repair.

    In short, not one of the usual suspects is a great choice, but Romney, Pawlenty and Daniels seem to be good choices who could win. Obama is very weak, so as far as electoral strategy goes, it may not matter which of the three gets the nod.

    I think that an effective and charismatic governor or former governor might still step forward.

    Depending on how his older brother’s image develops in the next several months, I don’t think it’s absurd to consider Jeb Bush. As we gain more distance from the Bush Presidency, people are viewing him more favorably. I doubt that Dubya’s image will be sufficiently rehabilitated in time for Jeb to make a successful run in 2012. But there’s an outside chance. Were it not for his brother’s negatives, Jeb would be a very good candidate.

    Texas Governor Rick Perry is also someone who might have the charisma, toughness, platform and record to make a run. He was in the thick of the Tea Party movement. Some people might view his secession comments to be damning.

  • SKPeterson

    Butch Otter. Awesome name – cuts across multiple demographics, but he is a southerner and a Bronco, so suspect.

  • SKPeterson

    Butch Otter. Awesome name – cuts across multiple demographics, but he is a southerner and a Bronco, so suspect.

  • Jimmy Veith

    As an Obama supporter, I think that it would be a conflict of interest for me to suggest who the Republicans should nominate for President. (I might want the weakest candidate to be the Republican nominee to increase Obama’s chances of re-election. But that would be wicked on my part.)

    The nominee will most likely be a Governor. But to the extent you are looking for a candidate from the House of Representatives, let me narrow the field to the following:

    Denny Rehberg from Montana,
    Walter Jones of North Carolina,
    David McKinley of West Virginia,
    Ron Paul of Texas

    What do these four Congressmen have in common? They are the only Republicans voting against Paul Ryan’s plan to end Medicare as we know it. I predict that any congressman supporting his plan can not possibly win even the Republican nomination. I predict that this will be the single most important issue in 2012.

  • Jimmy Veith

    As an Obama supporter, I think that it would be a conflict of interest for me to suggest who the Republicans should nominate for President. (I might want the weakest candidate to be the Republican nominee to increase Obama’s chances of re-election. But that would be wicked on my part.)

    The nominee will most likely be a Governor. But to the extent you are looking for a candidate from the House of Representatives, let me narrow the field to the following:

    Denny Rehberg from Montana,
    Walter Jones of North Carolina,
    David McKinley of West Virginia,
    Ron Paul of Texas

    What do these four Congressmen have in common? They are the only Republicans voting against Paul Ryan’s plan to end Medicare as we know it. I predict that any congressman supporting his plan can not possibly win even the Republican nomination. I predict that this will be the single most important issue in 2012.

  • steve

    Yes, at one point Obama seemed too obscure to win. Republicans just need to get behind the nominee… unless it’s Trump. I would rather hand over another four years to Obama before I vote for another shameless media whore.

  • steve

    Yes, at one point Obama seemed too obscure to win. Republicans just need to get behind the nominee… unless it’s Trump. I would rather hand over another four years to Obama before I vote for another shameless media whore.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    What’s wrong with Ron Paul?

    Not sexy enough to get women voters.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    What’s wrong with Ron Paul?

    Not sexy enough to get women voters.

  • DonS

    Ron Paul voted no on the Ryan plan because, in his words, it “didn’t go far enough”. Not because he is suddenly enamored with huge, unlimited, bankrupting entitlement programs.

  • DonS

    Ron Paul voted no on the Ryan plan because, in his words, it “didn’t go far enough”. Not because he is suddenly enamored with huge, unlimited, bankrupting entitlement programs.

  • DonS

    Jimmy @ 64: I rather think you underestimate the American people. Seniors recognize that Ryan’s plan doesn’t affect them. Younger folks realize that if we don’t do something dramatic now, Medicare won’t exist at all by the time they age into it.

    I don’t think the Medicare issue is going to sway the 2012 election in the Democrats’ favor.

  • DonS

    Jimmy @ 64: I rather think you underestimate the American people. Seniors recognize that Ryan’s plan doesn’t affect them. Younger folks realize that if we don’t do something dramatic now, Medicare won’t exist at all by the time they age into it.

    I don’t think the Medicare issue is going to sway the 2012 election in the Democrats’ favor.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “plan to end Medicare as we know it.”

    Medicare, as we know it, will end because things that can’t go on forever, don’t.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “plan to end Medicare as we know it.”

    Medicare, as we know it, will end because things that can’t go on forever, don’t.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “I don’t think the Medicare issue is going to sway the 2012 election in the Democrats’ favor.”

    That could be true if the plan is accurately communicated to voters.

    What are the odds of that happening?

    Propaganda is everything.

    Remember the news about the Alaska senator who allegedly received illegal free stuff, yada, yada? He lost the election by a tiny margin. When his case came to trial, the judge dismissed it directly for lack of evidence. He also sharply criticized those who prosecuted the case. Bottom line, he is not in the senate; a democrat is.

  • http://www.biblegateway.com/versions/Contemporary-English-Version-CEV-Bible/ sg

    “I don’t think the Medicare issue is going to sway the 2012 election in the Democrats’ favor.”

    That could be true if the plan is accurately communicated to voters.

    What are the odds of that happening?

    Propaganda is everything.

    Remember the news about the Alaska senator who allegedly received illegal free stuff, yada, yada? He lost the election by a tiny margin. When his case came to trial, the judge dismissed it directly for lack of evidence. He also sharply criticized those who prosecuted the case. Bottom line, he is not in the senate; a democrat is.

  • http://www.roundunvarnishedtale.blogspot.com Cheryl

    Daniels has gotten a lot of flak for his so-called “truce” on social issues. I am socially conservative, but this statement doesn’t bother me. I see it as an acknowledgment that we have to pick our battles and right now the primary battle is against socialism. Daniels has said that he will sign the Planned Parenthood defunding bill when it comes to his desk next week. That says a lot to me about his willingness to stand up for life and other conservative values.

  • http://www.roundunvarnishedtale.blogspot.com Cheryl

    Daniels has gotten a lot of flak for his so-called “truce” on social issues. I am socially conservative, but this statement doesn’t bother me. I see it as an acknowledgment that we have to pick our battles and right now the primary battle is against socialism. Daniels has said that he will sign the Planned Parenthood defunding bill when it comes to his desk next week. That says a lot to me about his willingness to stand up for life and other conservative values.

  • http://theobservationtree.blogspot.com Louis

    My 2c worth:

    A US president’s conservatism/liberalism is of relatively minor effect – congress makes the laws, not him. That’s just how it is. Furthermore, the prime battle for the US is not against this ideology or that ideology, it is against debt and deficits. That battle will overwhelm all else, as long as nobody start a new, major war. That considered, you need a “CEO”-type president that can lead towards making difficult but realistic financial decisions. Somebody that understands money, management and budgets. Someone with track experience.

    No this doesn’t lead to Trump, since he excells at bankruptcy – and the US cannot afford bankruptcy (actually, no-one in the world would benefit at all). If the US didn’t have such crazy bankruptcy laws, Trump would not be there where he doesn’t belong.

    No, for Republicans, in my limited knowledge (granted), this leads to Romeny.

  • http://theobservationtree.blogspot.com Louis

    My 2c worth:

    A US president’s conservatism/liberalism is of relatively minor effect – congress makes the laws, not him. That’s just how it is. Furthermore, the prime battle for the US is not against this ideology or that ideology, it is against debt and deficits. That battle will overwhelm all else, as long as nobody start a new, major war. That considered, you need a “CEO”-type president that can lead towards making difficult but realistic financial decisions. Somebody that understands money, management and budgets. Someone with track experience.

    No this doesn’t lead to Trump, since he excells at bankruptcy – and the US cannot afford bankruptcy (actually, no-one in the world would benefit at all). If the US didn’t have such crazy bankruptcy laws, Trump would not be there where he doesn’t belong.

    No, for Republicans, in my limited knowledge (granted), this leads to Romeny.

  • http://theobservationtree.blogspot.com Louis

    BTW, dull leaders are often good leaders. Just look at our fellow! :)

  • http://theobservationtree.blogspot.com Louis

    BTW, dull leaders are often good leaders. Just look at our fellow! :)

  • Another Kerner

    Well, folks, Paul Ryan is my congressman. :-)
    And I am a “senior” citizen type who supports his Budget Plan.
    At his town listening session two weeks ago, he received a standing ovation from the people who were packed solid in the meeting room and wedged in the halls and on down the stairwells to hear his proposals.
    The applause and cheers for him started when he walked into the room, from folks in their middle and advancing age, including some young people wearing T-shirts which read, ” I love Gov. Scott Walker”.

    Granted, Waukesha County is one of the more “conservative” in Wisconsin. Typically, Waukesha County off-sets Dane County where the University and state capital are located.

    I interject this information simply because Wisconsin is considered a swing state. The November 2010 election sent “conservative” majorities to both the Assembly and State Senate and captured the Governor’s seat and sent Democrat US Senator Russ Feingold home.

    The recent election for State Supreme Court Justice, considered a referendum on Scott Walker’s Budget Plan, yielded a strict constructionist Justice, with an amazing voter turn-out for a court race which was virtually standing alone in most communities.
    (Currently a recount is taking place, with the sitting Justice Prosser considered the “winner.”)

    Having said all of the above, the 2012 Presidential race, provided the Republicans field a genuine alternative to the current President, appears to reflect the view of an electorate which is pretty much fed-up with the tax and spend crowd in the various states and the country in general.

    Once again, Mr. Rommney is his father’s son…hair and all.

    However, a “conservative” US house and US Senate would balance an “establishment” guy, keeping him/her in check.

    I still think Gov. Christie would be an excellent choice, even discounting some of the “social issues” .

    I can’t imagine the current President serving a second term, given the tax issues, joblessness rates, and fuel costs, not to mention the loss of individual liberty and freedom in general offered by the “progressives”.

    I am very happy with Ron and Rand Paul right where they are:
    The House and Senate need them.

  • Another Kerner

    Well, folks, Paul Ryan is my congressman. :-)
    And I am a “senior” citizen type who supports his Budget Plan.
    At his town listening session two weeks ago, he received a standing ovation from the people who were packed solid in the meeting room and wedged in the halls and on down the stairwells to hear his proposals.
    The applause and cheers for him started when he walked into the room, from folks in their middle and advancing age, including some young people wearing T-shirts which read, ” I love Gov. Scott Walker”.

    Granted, Waukesha County is one of the more “conservative” in Wisconsin. Typically, Waukesha County off-sets Dane County where the University and state capital are located.

    I interject this information simply because Wisconsin is considered a swing state. The November 2010 election sent “conservative” majorities to both the Assembly and State Senate and captured the Governor’s seat and sent Democrat US Senator Russ Feingold home.

    The recent election for State Supreme Court Justice, considered a referendum on Scott Walker’s Budget Plan, yielded a strict constructionist Justice, with an amazing voter turn-out for a court race which was virtually standing alone in most communities.
    (Currently a recount is taking place, with the sitting Justice Prosser considered the “winner.”)

    Having said all of the above, the 2012 Presidential race, provided the Republicans field a genuine alternative to the current President, appears to reflect the view of an electorate which is pretty much fed-up with the tax and spend crowd in the various states and the country in general.

    Once again, Mr. Rommney is his father’s son…hair and all.

    However, a “conservative” US house and US Senate would balance an “establishment” guy, keeping him/her in check.

    I still think Gov. Christie would be an excellent choice, even discounting some of the “social issues” .

    I can’t imagine the current President serving a second term, given the tax issues, joblessness rates, and fuel costs, not to mention the loss of individual liberty and freedom in general offered by the “progressives”.

    I am very happy with Ron and Rand Paul right where they are:
    The House and Senate need them.

  • Grace

    In reponse to some of the commenters here on the blog, who support our current administration, and march to the liberal pit, I offer this article.

    Marvin Olasky is Editor and Chief of WORLD Magazine, below are several excerpts from the article he wrote.

    Fighting poverty and leveraging greed
    April 23, 2011

    In recession-smacked Florida, and other parts of the country, government and individuals (and baseball owners) have to face up to hard choices | Marvin Olasky

    “Felton, a 26-year Navy veteran, frankly criticized the way President Obama “gets up on TV and says his program will help people stay in their homes. It won’t. . . . He can’t come through without wrecking the whole system. Seems to me, if you can’t produce, don’t give people false hopes.”

    After our article, the News-Press—Fort Myers’ daily newspaper—named Felton one of its six “Heroes of 2010″ for the way he has “helped more than 1,900 people work out a deal that will allow them to stay in their homes or leave their homes in a way that least harms their credit.”

    - – another excerpt – -

    “Felton sees problems in both individual beliefs and government actions. First, the personal: “People say we’ve learned from the housing bubble. I don’t think so. . . . We say we’re not going to eat out, but we do. If my pocketbook says ‘nope,’ maybe I won’t. If it says ‘maybe,’ I will. . . . We’re not going to change unless we have to.” Most people, he says, were not frugal during good times so they had no cushion when joblessness struck.

    The heart of the problem, he believes, is, “We are not a God-fearing people anymore. If people were going to church and being taught the necessities, we wouldn’t be in this mess.” A churchgoer, Felton says, “We have lots of churches without much teaching. . . . We have to go back to the basics: family, church, education. . . . For many men the trinity is women, alcohol, sports.”

    The second problem, he says, is government: raising taxes and embarking on grand projects instead of also emphasizing basics. Cape Coral is laying off police officers and firefighters, but the Lee County Board of Commissioners has now agreed to spend probably $80 million to build a new spring training complex for the Boston Red Sox. Felton asks, “How can you go out and build a stadium in this economy?” He also notes, “The old community is devastated.”

    http://www.worldmag.com/articles/17892?CFID=438020&CFTOKEN=92588380

  • Grace

    In reponse to some of the commenters here on the blog, who support our current administration, and march to the liberal pit, I offer this article.

    Marvin Olasky is Editor and Chief of WORLD Magazine, below are several excerpts from the article he wrote.

    Fighting poverty and leveraging greed
    April 23, 2011

    In recession-smacked Florida, and other parts of the country, government and individuals (and baseball owners) have to face up to hard choices | Marvin Olasky

    “Felton, a 26-year Navy veteran, frankly criticized the way President Obama “gets up on TV and says his program will help people stay in their homes. It won’t. . . . He can’t come through without wrecking the whole system. Seems to me, if you can’t produce, don’t give people false hopes.”

    After our article, the News-Press—Fort Myers’ daily newspaper—named Felton one of its six “Heroes of 2010″ for the way he has “helped more than 1,900 people work out a deal that will allow them to stay in their homes or leave their homes in a way that least harms their credit.”

    - – another excerpt – -

    “Felton sees problems in both individual beliefs and government actions. First, the personal: “People say we’ve learned from the housing bubble. I don’t think so. . . . We say we’re not going to eat out, but we do. If my pocketbook says ‘nope,’ maybe I won’t. If it says ‘maybe,’ I will. . . . We’re not going to change unless we have to.” Most people, he says, were not frugal during good times so they had no cushion when joblessness struck.

    The heart of the problem, he believes, is, “We are not a God-fearing people anymore. If people were going to church and being taught the necessities, we wouldn’t be in this mess.” A churchgoer, Felton says, “We have lots of churches without much teaching. . . . We have to go back to the basics: family, church, education. . . . For many men the trinity is women, alcohol, sports.”

    The second problem, he says, is government: raising taxes and embarking on grand projects instead of also emphasizing basics. Cape Coral is laying off police officers and firefighters, but the Lee County Board of Commissioners has now agreed to spend probably $80 million to build a new spring training complex for the Boston Red Sox. Felton asks, “How can you go out and build a stadium in this economy?” He also notes, “The old community is devastated.”

    http://www.worldmag.com/articles/17892?CFID=438020&CFTOKEN=92588380

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    John Bolton is considering a run (he is a Lutheran -BTW-)
    Bachmann/Bolton or visa/versa!
    C-CS

  • http://carolmsblog.blogspot.com/ Carol-Christian Soldier

    John Bolton is considering a run (he is a Lutheran -BTW-)
    Bachmann/Bolton or visa/versa!
    C-CS

  • Booklover

    ski @43–”old white men who are appalled that a black man got himself elected president.”

    So you’re against Sarah Palin simply because she’s a woman?

  • Booklover

    ski @43–”old white men who are appalled that a black man got himself elected president.”

    So you’re against Sarah Palin simply because she’s a woman?

  • ‘Ski

    Blover, I was describing @43 the GOP’s core audience. No, I’m not against Palin simply because she’s a woman; there are so many other, legitimate reasons, but still, I’m not sure what you’re asking.

  • ‘Ski

    Blover, I was describing @43 the GOP’s core audience. No, I’m not against Palin simply because she’s a woman; there are so many other, legitimate reasons, but still, I’m not sure what you’re asking.


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