Thou shalt not covet

Chuck Bentley at the American Thinker discusses the forgotten Commandment (some might say, the forgotten two Commandments):  “Thou shalt not covet.”  He argues that coveting–that is, envy–is at the root of many of our economic, political, and cultural problems. [Read more...]

The New York Times on World Magazine

The New York Times, of all publications, has an appreciative article on World Magazine, where I used to be cultural editor.  It lauds the conservative Christian publication for investigating and exposing wrongdoing among conservative Christians. [Read more...]

The poppies of the Tower

London is transfixed by a stunning war memorial commemorating Armistice Day, when World War I ended on November 11, 1918, honored in the United States as Veteran’s Day.  All around the iconic Tower of London are  888,246 ceramic poppies, one for each soldier of the Commonwealth who was killed in that war.   A beautiful sea of flowers that looks simultaneously like a horrible sea of blood makes a noble tribute for all veterans.

[Read more...]

Is being a tightrope walker a Christian vocation?

Nick Wallenda is the tightrope walker who recently walked on a wire–blindfolded–between two skyscrapers in Chicago.  He is a Christian and often talks about his faith, praying before his stunts (which have included walking across the Grand Canyon and the Niagra Falls) and calling on Christ for help.  So is being a tightrope walker a Christian vocation?

David Murray has an interesting discussion about this, concluding that, no, it is not, on the grounds that it does not follow four criteria that he says are necessary for a true Christian vocation.  I don’t think I agree.  I suppose part of it is that he is articulating a Reformed view of vocation, which is not quite the same as the Lutheran one, which I hold to.   And yet, though I’m not sure that these are the right criteria to evaluate a calling,  I’m thinking that Wallenda does, in fact, meet them.   At any rate, I tend to think that the origin of such a wild and strange and wonder-inspiring talent could only come from God.  When I see or hear about something so extraordinary and someone so fearless, I do glorify God.  A tightrope walker does love and serve his neighbors by filling them with awe.

What do you think? [Read more...]

Panic

Americans are panicking over Ebola, and authorities are concerned not just to stem the disease but to stem the panic.  They are saying the chances of any of us actually dying of Ebola is microscopically low, that we are more likely to die of a shark attack, bee stings, or falling out of bed.  Alexandra Petri says that if that’s true, we need to panic over those other things too! [Read more...]

The fastest-growing new religious movement

Several years ago,  I blogged about the adoration of Santa Muerte,  St. Death (as in a feminine saint), the hooded skeleton being venerated by Mexican drug lords.  But now prayers to this saint and the sale of her images and icons have come into the mainstream, and not just in Hispanic enclaves but throughout the world.  You can now find her images in Wal-Mart.

Although the Santa Muerte cult takes the form of the veneration of saints in Roman Catholicism, the Church strongly opposes the practice.   Taping dollar bills to her statue and leaving cigarettes and liquor as offerings are thought to cause Santa Muerte to provide good luck and protection.  One expert says that worship of “Holy Death” is “the fastest-growing new religious movement.”  I suppose it is fitting that a culture of death has a religion of death.

Read about the phenomenon after the jump.

[Read more...]


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X