Super-Christians & vows against vocation

In the second in Mission Work’s series on a Lutheran perspective on faith & work, Rev. Adam Roe offers a post entitled No super-Christians.  He discusses Luther’s reaction against the view that those who want to be particularly spiritual–”super-Christians”–would become monks, nuns, or priests.  These were considered callings from God–”vocations”–while lay occupations were not.

I would add that the specific way that a person became a “super-Christian” contributed to the problem:  A person who sought to become “religious” took–and still takes–vows.  [Read more...]

Male abortions & the end of “women’s issues”?

Feminism and gender politics in general may be coming apart, since gender  identity is being parsed into ever-smaller mutually offended units.  To so much as speak of “women’s issues” is now considered in some of these circles to be oppressive to transexuals, an act of “cissexism,” defined as “transphobia.”  To the point that some pro-abortion groups are eliminating references to women, since non-women (such as transexuals who used to be women but now identify as men, as well as “gender queer people” and “two spirit people”) also can have abortions.  So explains Katherine Timpf, after the jump. [Read more...]

The actual war against Christianity

As Christians are preoccupied with the thought that the culture is carrying on a war against them, an actual war is being waged in the Middle East that exterminating whole populations of Christians.  And yet, not the American government nor even American churches are doing or even saying much about it.  An article in Foreign Policy, excerpted and linked after the jump, tries to understand why.

It would seem that Democrats are concentrating on improving relations with Muslims and Republicans are so committed to Israel that they overlook Mideast Christians, who tend to be anti-Israel.  I would add that both Western Catholics and evangelicals often find these ancient sects to be alien, asking “but are they really Christians?”  In the meantime, this article accuses ISIS/the Islamic State of the “g” word:  GENOCIDE. [Read more...]

The true meaning of St. Patrick’s Day

The true meaning of St. Patrick’s Day, which is today, is not to honor Ireland but to honor missionaries.  But we can honor Ireland too, which–thanks to St. Patrick and the church he brought to that island–saved civilization.  To celebrate the day, don’t just wear green.  Read this meditation by St. Patrick, which has been turned into a hymn and one of this blog’s most popular posts:  Christ within me, Christ behind me, Christ before me.

[Read more...]

It’s the family, stupid

Before Robert Putnam there was Patrick Moynihan, the social scientist and later Democratic Senator from New York, who pointed to the dire social and economic consequences when children are not raised by intact families.  His research to this effect came out 50 years ago.  He was studying African-Americans, who back in 1960 had a birthrate to unmarried mothers of 23.6%, which Moynihan believed kept them trapped in poverty, crime, and bad schools.  Today, the unmarried birth rate of all races is more than twice that.

George Will discusses Moynihan’s findings and gives some striking quotations. [Read more...]

The Cranach NCAA pool

There is probably a way to set up an online pool for your NCAA basketball tournament predictions, complete with interactive brackets and monetary awards, but that goes beyond the scope of our Patheos software.  So let’s just keep it simple:  Give your projections for the Final Four, the top two, and the national champion.

BONUS:  There always seems to be a surprise “Cinderella” team, some little school that comes out of nowhere to break into the Sweet Sixteen or otherwise do better than anyone would have expected.  Will that happen again this year, and, if so, who will it be?

The person with the best predictions will win not money but blog glory and bragging rights. [Read more...]


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