Birding

Monday morning early, with the sun high on a tall, tall pine tree in a neighbor’s yard and I, sitting on my back porch sipping a cup of coffee, saw six Cooper’s hawks at the top of the tree. I had never seen six Coopers at once. But there they were mapping out their food for their day and apportioning space.
Sunday evening we were delighted to see a hummingbird camp out for awhile on one of our hummer feeders. We set the feeders out two weeks ago and have been keeping our eye on them. I’m persuaded of this: You have to develop an “eye” for seeing them. Monday evening Kris saw a female hummer a few times taking a few dips in our feeders.
Kris followed all the advice that Fr. Rob Merola gave about using mini-feeders and it worked. Thanks to Rob.
Neither of us cares all that much about the Coopers — though one was found landing in our back yard Sunday evening and we had every intention of shooing it out of the yard. By the time we got to the door he was up and away. But, there’s nothing like a hummer.
ruby.jpg
PS: Our aging Bichon Frise, Webster, has become so well-known to the squirrels in our backyard that they don’t even more when he comes outside to take care of his business. They watch him just in case he suddenly acquires a dog-nature, but they’re now convinced he has no interest.

About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • http://www.calacirian.org sonja

    Scot, I am (at this very moment) sitting three feet under a hummingbird feeder as the hummers dive bomb me and the feeder. Yesterday one hung in the air so close to my face that I could have reached out and touched her, if she’d have allowed it. When they perch on the feeder they watch me out of the eye closest to me. I watch them as well. It’s sooo amazing. They are the most amazing creatures. There is a tree nearby in which I have spied them preening themselves occasionally.

  • My 2 cents

    Cornell used to organize the bird census, but I think it is now handled by eBird (eBird is a continent-wide, year-round survey of North American birds. Participants can enter observations of any bird, from anywhere, at anytime. eBird uses state of the art Web technology to provide a simple and flexible, yet powerful, way for participants to track the birds they see and share that information with scientists, teachers, amateur naturalists, and other birders.) You should participate!

  • Pat

    I too love the hummingbirds. WE have had a couple in our yard to visit, but the bees are taking over our feeder. But, one thing that was amazing….one bird stopped in a dead bush right by our deck and just sat there still. We’d never seen one light for so long before!

  • http://www.jesustheradicalpastor.blogspot.com John W Frye

    Julie and I have had hummingbird feeders for several years now and we’ve discerned the hummingbird “Hatfields and McCoys.” They dive bomb each other if they happen to want to feed at the same time. One comes and sits for quite a while on an iron plant stake near the feeder. Their arial movements are fascinating!

  • Wags

    Speaking of birds, we now have a hawk that has been stalking. He circles high above and I can only assume his talons are fixed on our 13 pound terrier – Moses. The neighbor has found piles of feathers in his yard, remnants of the stalker’s appetite. My goodness, what is a guy to do? Take up arms?

  • http://www.JesusCreed.org Scot McKnight

    Wags,
    I don’t think Hawks go for dogs; that hawk is riding the winds.

  • http://www.emergentvoyageurs.blog.com Jamie Arpin-Ricci

    Hey Scot,
    You and Kris need to visit my old hometown, Rainy River, ON, as the area is one of the best kept secrets for birdwatching. Oh, and I have seen hawks attempt to capture large domestic cats, so small dogs might be attractive. However, though it not unheard of, it is very rare.
    Peace,
    Jamie


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X