This one is impossible. Why? So many books on Jesus have been truly ground-breaking and paradigm-challenging, and I’ve limited myself to ten. This list is the top ten Jesus books that I like to read and from which I have learned so much. I don’t agree with any of them completely. Some of these are no longer in print, but can be found (often, usually) on Advanced Book Exchange.1. N.T. Wright, Jesus and the Victory of God2. B.F. Meyer, The… Read more

If the Lord’s Prayer is the sort of thing we pray for if we love God and love others, then it would be good to look at some specifics.In the first half of the Lord’s Prayer we learn the following things about loving God:1. To love God means to relate to God as Father. It is not enough to say Jesus taught us to “call” God Father. “Father” is more than a name we give to God, as if we’ve… Read more

Graham Old’s comment stung. Thanks Graham. The list on spiritual formation was slanted too one-sidedly toward individualism, and so I want to add a second list to balance it out. This one focuses on formation as a communal and missional endeavor. Community formation shapes individual formation.I’m cheating here with some numbers with more than one book.1. R. Sider, Good News and Good Works and Churches that Make a Difference and Rich Christians in an Age of Hunger2. J. Wallis, Faith… Read more

One of the more interesting features of the Lord’s Prayer is that it is both like a Jewish prayer, called the Qaddish, and at the same time unlike that same prayer.The Qaddish reads like this:Magnified and sanctified be his great name in the world He created according to His will. May He establish His kingdom during your life and during your days, and during the life of all the house of Israel, speedily and in the near future. And say… Read more

In this series of blogs I want to look at a variety of categories and the top ten books for each category. Today we will look at Spiritual Formation.By way of preface, there are four books that look at spiritual formation in a comprehensive, text-book fashion. I will avoid “linking” to Amazon on each of these.Introductions: M. Thompson, Soul Feast. R. Foster, Streams of Living Water. J. Ortberg, The Life You’ve Always Wanted. T. Jones, The Sacred Way.My Top Ten… Read more

In this series of blogs I want to look at a variety of categories and the top ten books for each category. Today we will look at Spiritual Formation.By way of preface, there are four books that look at spiritual formation in a comprehensive, text-book fashion. I will avoid “linking” to Amazon on each of these.Introductions: M. Thompson, Soul Feast. R. Foster, Streams of Living Water. J. Ortberg, The Life You’ve Always Wanted. T. Jones, The Sacred Way.My Top Ten… Read more

I’ve pointed to John Frye’s blog before, but today his blog is especially choice. He’s defining “pastor,” and this by one who has pastored for years and who has written about it. After all these years, he’s now working out for us what it means to be a pastor in light of his new reading of Jesus scholarship and it seems he’s got something like this every week.This echoes Tom Wright:Pastors redefine the symbolic world of people so that people… Read more

Somehow I lost this blog in cyberspace, so here it is again. A very good study of what it means to be missional as found at Andrew Hamilton’s site. Read more

Kris and I returned our son’s dog, Slater, today. On our return, Kris and I couldn’t resist a trip through Middlebury Indiana, a place surrounded with Amish.When our kids were grade schoolers, we spent an afternoon with Milton and Lizzie Yoder in Middlebury in their home. When I met Milt, he asked me pretty quickly this question: “What do you do for a living?” Now that has some gravity for the Amish, who take their vocations far more seriously than… Read more

Kris and I returned our son’s dog, Slater, today. On our return, Kris and I couldn’t resist a trip through Middlebury Indiana, a place surrounded with Amish.When our kids were grade schoolers, we spent an afternoon with Milton and Lizzie Yoder in Middlebury in their home. When I met Milt, he asked me pretty quickly this question: “What do you do for a living?” Now that has some gravity for the Amish, who take their vocations far more seriously than… Read more

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