I’ll Be On The Radio This Morning

This morning, from 11:30 to noon (Pacific Time) on KDIA AM 1640, “Pastor Fred” will interview me and have me chat with listeners who call into his radio show Reaching For Life.  (You can also listen online.) For those of you who haven’t heard me on the radio before, this is an outstanding opportunity for you to check out the sonic impact of my severely deviated septum.

No (well, yes) but if you like me, call in, and ask me total softball questions, like, “So, John, what makes you such a great writer?” or, “John, I absolutely loved your book, I’m OK–You’re Not: The Message We’re Sending Unbelievers and Why We Should Stop. I bought 30 copies to give to all my friends. Everyone should do the same. So, John, what special talents of yours gave you the power to write such a fantastically insightful, yet totally hilarious book?”

See, if you call up and say stuff like that, then people who want to scream at me won’t be able to get through.

Whoo-hoo!

So remember: Like me, call in. Don’t like me … forget you read this.

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About John Shore

John Shore (who, fwiw, is straight) is the author of UNFAIR: Christians and the LGBT Question, and three other great books. He is founder of Unfundamentalist Christians (on Facebook here), and executive editor of the Unfundamentalist Christians group blog.  (In total John's two blogs receive some 250,000 views per month.) John is also co-founder of The NALT Christians Project, which was written about by TIME,  The Washington Post, and others. His website is JohnShore.com. John is a pastor ordained by The Progressive Christian Alliance. You're invited to like John's Facebook page. And don't forget to sign up for his mucho awesome monthly newsletter.

  • http://www.johnshore.wordpress.com John Shore

    Yikes! I hope you're daughter's okay! What's "re-cert" refer to?? Sounds like … not fun.

    Yeah, the interview was … what it was. They tend not to be funny; humor takes TIME, and you always have so little. So instead of being funny, I tend (I fear) to sound really STRIDENT.

    Radio interviewers always go, "I read your book It's so funny. BE FUNNY!" But then, you know: I've got to do justice to what I'm saying in the book. And I think by nature I always seem … intense.

    Anyway. I had a great time. Pastorj Fred was extremely supportive of the book; he really liked it (and, in fact, as far as I know, is going to write a blurb for it, which I really appreciate). It was a good, thoughtful interview. On his part, anyway. I never have any idea how I did until I hear the thing later.

    It was done on phone. They almost always are (except the one I did for Jim Burns, where I went to his studio, which is about an hour's drive from my house).

    It's kind of funny. The station calls; they put you on hold; you're listening to the show through the radio; all of a sudden the host starts talking about you, and then you realize that YOU'RE supposed to start talking. (The thing I've had to learn is to slow down: you tend to talk FAST, because you're nervous and every little pause on the radio sounds, to you, like two hours of dead time.)

    Anyway, yeah. That was too much information. Sorry. Trying to avoid household chores.

    At some point, Fred'll archive the show at the bottom of this page: http://www.reachingforlife.org/broadcast.shtml

    Thanks for trying to listen! Hope your daughter's okay!

  • nisperos

    Ah, the "attention money", "lap octopus", and "attack-monster.com" are all one and the same wonderful kid who lives in our house.

    "Re-cert" is a routine mundane thing, mostly paperwork, which you have to do every so often if you have a disabled kid who receives personal home-care. A nurse has to see a live person and ascertain that things are as they should be, review meds, try to take a blood pressure (or NOT if there's no cooperation) and get a heart rate. Everyday stuff in our piece of the world here. The nurse who visited is a great person, smart, and tells good stories. I love having her come here. I drink coffee and offer her cold Lipton green tea while we talk and do paperwork. It's all really quite lovely. It's nice having another adult to visit with for a spell.

    Well, technically, my kid is an adult — almost 19, but we are in the process of getting guardianship. The "cuddle-sport" functions somewhat like a giant toddler. Kind of hard to describe: She is quite mobile by crawling, but unable to walk or propel a wheelchair on her own. She doesn't speak, sign, or use assistive technology, so you have to get to know her to figure her out. OK, I'm the mom, but still, most would also agree she's quite cute.

    When she arrived home from school today, the nurse was already here. I got "smiler" off the bus and brought her in and let her out of her chair to get onto the floor. She's mostly ignored the nurse in the past, but today, she crawled right over to her and tried to climb in her lap. (The nurse thought that was kind of nice, but did have to hand me her glasses so they wouldn't get accidentally broken.)

    A bit of perspective: One of my SILs (we just got back from visiting a ton of people on vacation) says I'm lucky to have this one — and I agree. She says every family has one which presents challenges (hubby says we should have asked her which one she thought was the one in their family of origin). My kid, for example, doesn't have persistent mental illness, substance abuse problems, legal problems, doesn't worry about what others think, doesn't take 6 years getting through college at the undergraduate level, etc…

    But really, how can you not love a kid who is (almost) always in a good mood and (almost) always smiling. At times, we've said to each other that she didn't get that from either one of us ; – ) And, she is also "the princess of just about everything" (Key words: "just about"). She runs the house and runs her corner of the world (house all on one floor, bathroom remodelled for her, handicapped van…)

    In an unfair world where jocks, celebrities, and good looking people get preferences, she has it made! I've had people tell me they wish they could trade places with her for a few days so as to have everyone wait on them and to be relieved from their own stressors…

    The other really unfair thing is that she can eat all her food AND all of everyone else's food AND snack all the time and still retain her girlish figure… (Yeah, I'd like to trade that feature with her too.)

  • nisperos

    Whoops, I meant "attention monkey" but the $$$s applies as well ; – )

  • nisperos

    Hey, nice voice…

    The show started late and the nurse came early to do a re-cert with my daughter… so I got to hear you for like 2 minutes…

    If an on-line tape of the broadcast gets posted, please let us know…

    Hope there’s some more humor, as it started out very serious despite the quip about the great commandment and the great commission being like trains competing for the same track…

    Were you up in San Francisco for the broadcast? Or was it a local interview in San Diego?

    (Asking these questions allows me to once again point out some information about Fort Collins, CO to you or anyone else who might be looking for a place to move to:

    Like San Francisco, Fort Collins has a streetcar or trolley. Car # 21, a Birney Safety Car, runs 1.5 miles from City Park into the edge of downtown during the summer. Fort Collins was the smallest city in the United States having it’s own electric municipal railway and the Fort Collins trolley was the last trolley to operate in Colorado. In 1947, it had the lowest trolley fares in the nation at 5¢ a ride and $1.00 for an unlimited monthly pass and, it made money that year! Dogs were allowed to be carried on trolley cars when accompanied by the owner and upon receipt of full fare for the dog in addition to owner’s fare. http://www.fortnet.org/trolley/

    Like San Diego, we compete well for sunshine, having over 300 days of sunshine a year…)

    Anyway, congrats on the increased press for your book!


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