APNewsBreak: Vatican cites sovereignty as defense in abuse case, says bishops aren’t employees.

It’s begun, y’all. If you’re not already,  start tracking what’s happening with the Vatican — or miss out on what I think is going to end up being one of the most cataclysmic stories in the 2,000 year history of the Christian church. It’s unbelievable, to think where this big, heavy, increasingly speeding train is going to end up.

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  • http://kenreads.wordpress.com wken

    I agree. This is big. On the one hand, I do feel for a large number of very sincere, faithful Catholics who are watching their church fail them (or, rather, having it exposed just how badly it failed them) — including my mother-in-law.

    On the other hand, there are individuals and families who have been experiencing this failure for years, even decades, and are long-overdue for some justice.

    I also can’t help but notice that this entire argument is happening in terms of worldly law. Has the Holy See conceded the spiritual side, already?

    Yes, this is big. And utterly heart-breaking.

  • http://wordindeed.wordpress.com Bill Kerschbaum

    Regardless of the Vatican’s responsibility in these matters, what bothers me and grieves me most is its lack of compassion, mourning, and brokenness. I’m an elder at my church, and our pastors are continually reminding us that the elders of the church are called to be “lead repenters.” That means we approach all things in a state of humility and brokenness, as sinners who constantly need grace. It’s that humility and brokenness that allows us to rightly lead the church.

    I don’t see that in the Vatican’s response to the sex abuse cases. Even if it is innocent of responsibility, where’s the brokenness, where’s the mourning? How are the cardinals, bishops, and the pope responding as lead repenters? Where are they reaching out to heal the oppressed and the broken? Why aren’t they righteously angry?

    All I see is self protection. That’s not grace, and it’s not how Christ leads the church. Nor is it how elders and other leaders are called to care for the church. We are called to heal, even when attacked. To suffer fo the sake of the flock, even when it’s the flock itself that causes our suffering.

    Maybe I’m not getting an accurate picture. Maybe the media is hiding certain facts from me, or I’ve been reading all the wrong reports. But to the degree that I’m seeing the truth: Shame on you, Vatican.


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