Auralia’s Colors… Revealed!


I’m always grateful to hear people’s thoughts about Auralia’s Colors or its sequels.

Some responses are familiar and kind: “I haven’t read your book, but I’m going to.” Thanks! No pressure.

Some make my day: “I read Auralia’s Colors!” All the way to the end? Wow. I’m relieved!

I’m especially grateful when it turns out that they’ve read Auralia’s Colors and its sequels.

When they’ve read them all in order? That’s a rare and wonderful thing.

Some responses challenge me to remain silent. “I didn’t like the book at all. I was several chapters into it when got really confused. Then I discovered that this is the third book in the series, so I stopped reading. One star out of five.” Um… I… oh, never mind.

But once in a while, somebody responds in a way that makes the whole five years of work worth it. And that happened this month when my friend Tegid Bard sent me a link to the blog of artist named Karen Eck.

What I found there was kind of astonishing.

Fumbling for words, I linked to the picture on my Facebook page. Note: Karen says she was inspired to start drawing a year ago, after reading Auralia’s Colors. A year ago. I know… right? If I could accomplish something like this in the course of one year, I would be tempted to take a break from writing and buy art supplies.

The flood of responses to Karen’s work on my Facebook page caught her by surprise, and she blogged this.

Apparently, she’s working on a whole series of images inspired by The Auralia Thread. (You can catch glimpses of the Cyndere’s Midnight image here.) I can hardly wait to see what comes of this.

But I will wait, Karen. I will. Take all the time you need. Beauty, after all, will save the world.

For the first time, I can imagine what an animated movie of Auralia’s Colors might look like. I wouldn’t object to a live-action version of the story, but an animated project… something along the lines of The Secret of Kells… would be a better approach. Karen’s surreal vision captures the sense of mystery that inspired me to write these stories in the first place.

If you’re interested in enjoying your own print of Karen’s work, it’s now available here.

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About Jeffrey Overstreet

Jeffrey Overstreet is the author of a “memoir of dangerous moviegoing” called Through a Screen Darkly, and a four-volume series of fantasy novels called The Auralia Thread, which includes Auralia’s Colors, Cyndere’s Midnight, Raven’s Ladder, and The Ale Boy’s Feast. Jeffrey is a contributing editor for Seattle Pacific University’s Response magazine, and he writes about art, faith, and culture for Image, Filmwell, and his own website, LookingCloser.org. His work has also appeared in Paste, Relevant, Books and Culture, and Christianity Today (where he was a film columnist and critic for almost a decade). He lives in Shoreline, Washington. Visit him on Facebook at facebook.com/jeffreyoverstreethq.

  • http://writingwithoutpaper.blogspot.com Maureen

    I’m thrilled for Karen. I know what her art means to her, and what your writing inspired her to draw is wonderful.

  • http://chadthomasjohnston.com Chad Thomas Johnston

    Jeff, that’s astonishing! :) By the way, I fully plan to read your series once I enter stay-at-home-Dad-dom in September. Really and truly. For Christmas, I want to give people books by people I know and/or admire. I am hoping to do that with your work, FYI.

    • Jeffrey Overstreet

      You are kind and generous, Chad. If you’d like to include some signed bookplates and Auralia Thread bookmarks with those gifts, email me your mailing address and I’ll send you package.

    • http://jenniferharrisdault.wordpress.com Jennifer Harris Dault

      Chaddy, you’ll like them. I’ve only read the first two at this point, but adored them — gave a few copies of the first book as gifts in Jeff City.

      Karen’s art is beautiful! I love the detail she added to the colors.

  • http://www.andrew-peterson.com Andrew Peterson

    Amazing. Seriously.


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