Steve Greydanus Reviews “The Lone Ranger”

Four words: Thanks for the warning.

Steve is troubled by something that increasingly worries me: the growing hatred our manufacturers of culture have for heroes.

  • http://www.parafool.com/ victor

    Hero: it’s a nice-boy notion that the real world’s gonna destroy.

    • Dan V

      Growing older you’ll find that illusions are brought
      And the idol you thought you’d be
      was just another zero

      I wanna’ be a hero

    • Elaine S.

      One of the few subjects about which I sorta agree with Ayn Rand is her view of what makes art, art, which she described in a book titled “The Romantic Manifesto.” She believed novels and movies should have real, larger than life heroes who made people aspire to be like them (she cited Mike Hammer and James Bond as two examples!) and she couldn’t stand the modern trend of “naturalistic” stories populated by weak or corrupt anti-heroes. Whether anyone would aspire to be like the heroes in her OWN novels, of course, is another story. But that said, “Manifesto” is the only Rand book I ever read all the way through and actually liked. I guess it was one of the two times per day (or decade, or career) that the “stopped clock” of Objectivism was actually right.

  • Stu

    It’s been panned by most critics already. It won’t be around long.

    Bad summer for Hollywood. Maybe they would do better if they stopped making crap.

  • Dave G.

    I assumed it would be lousy. My boys said it would be Jack Sparrow goes West. Probably a fair guess.

    • Rebecca Fuentes

      Maybe it just me, but it seems like Depp hasn’t been able to play anyone other than Sparrow since he took the role. Everything he’s done since seems like Sparrow in a new costume and setting. I think I’ll go read some Louis L’amour. At least the Sacketts stand by their own.

      • Dave G.

        I think they call it selling out. He used to be the fellow known for pushing the boundaries and taking risks. Now you’d be hard pressed to find a less predictable actor. A shame.

        • Rebecca Fuentes

          There’s this point for me when most famous actors become so famous that I don’t see their character onscreen. I just see the actor, acting. Depp reached that point. The ones who don’t are, I think, the real masters. I can always see Jack Nicholson’s character, for example. I can move into the movie instead of being jarred out of it.
          You’d think Depp would be adept enough at his craft to recognize the rut.

  • ivan_the_mad

    “Steve is troubled by something that increasingly worries me: the growing hatred our manufacturers of culture have for heroes.”

    Heh, I listened to that Beautiful Minds bit with Pearce this morning. They mentioned that, in the recently unsealed records of the Nobel committee which considered Tolkien’s nomination, they panned Tolkien’s work as second-rate prose. One of the hosts suggested that this was a back-handed compliment, given the propensity of the committee to reward counter-cultural innovators whose works threw the hero of old out the door. Perhaps this was indeed the case. Certainly today we have a dearth of figures who hew to virtue, and far too many sparkly vampires.

    Personally, I think it’s a serious case of envy on the part of the manufacturers.

  • kirthigdon

    I decided against seeing this version, even on Netflix, when I saw how Johnny Depp was making Tonto look like a freak. Depp is a talented actor, but this is a terrible misuse of his talent.
    Kirt Higdon

    • TomD

      Johnny Depp and freak in the same sentence. Who’da thunk :)

  • Mark S. (not for Shea)

    Well, if it’s any comfort, neither me nor my children have the slightest desire to see this flick. Can’t wait for PACIFIC RIM though.

  • http://www.likelierthings.com/ Jon W

    One of the coolest things I saw on the old Lone Ranger TV show was him eschewing torture as a way of saving Tonto. Tonto was about to ride into an ambush (or something), and the LR and a couple of old ladies had one of the bad guys tied up in the old ladies’ house. They were trying to get him to talk, and one of the old ladies suggested they boil some water and threaten him with it, and the LR said, “No, ma’am, I don’t work like that” (or something to that effect). They did, believe it or not, find another way to save Tonto.

    The upshot of it was, of course, that this man, who represented to kids what was best and most honorable about American justice, demonstrated to all the boys and girls watching the show that there were some things that were too wicked for an honorable man to do, even to save his best friend.


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