SNAP Crosses the Line into Inciting Vigilantes

publishes email addresses and phone numbers of accused priests.  If somebody gets hurt, SNAP has blood on their hands.  We still practice due process in this country.

  • Pappy

    SNAP has crossed the line a long time ago. Their real goal is to put money in the pockets of their own lawyers at the expense of Catholic dioceses.

    • kenofken

      There would be no group like SNAP had the Church done even a rough semblance of the right thing. Angry survivors are the fruit of an evil crop the Church planted and tended for many decades.

      Mark says we still have due process in this country. Except that we never did in these cases. These men were allowed to slink off into retirement because due process was thwarted by aiding their flight from justice, hiding evidence and reports of allegations and discouraging or even intimidating victims. Had there been due process, the accused abusers would have had their cases adjudicated by competent legal authorities and courts. They would have had a presumption of innocence and defense, and had they been truly innocent, their cases either would not be prosecuted or they would have been properly exonerated.

      • SteveP

        Except SNAP is not a judiciary empowered by the will of the people for the good of the people. You really are an enemy of the state if you laud such vigilantes. Or perhaps you’re just a barbarous thug. If you were not such a flamboyant hypocrite you’d be convincing your acquaintances to confess their exploitation of adolescents during the ‘70s and ‘80s, hoping for mercy from the grand jury.

        • kenofken

          I didn’t have acquaintances who exploited adolescents in the 70s and 80s, inasmuch as I was a kid myself in those years.

          I don’t at all advocate any sort of violence or illegal retribution against these men, but I laud the efforts of SNAP to pry up every stone and expose every secret and to pursue every form of legal justice in criminal or civil courts.

  • Irksome1

    SNAP, while odious, is merely doing that which is in its nature to do. I would argue that the greater blame lies with these poor priests’ bishops. SNAP would have nothing to publish had these bishops not released all their information, in violation of Canon Law.

  • faithandfamilyfirst

    If a “conservative” group were to publish names/addresses/whatever of some libs, there would be a whirlwind of dust as the lawyers rush to sue. Are there no lawyers willing to sue SNAP for this reprehensible conduct?

    • kenofken

      Many conservatives think it’s a wonderful idea to publish the names and addresses of abortion doctors and even patients. It was proposed most recently in Tennessee, I think, but has been part of bills in a few states over the years.

      I’m not sure on what basis SNAP could be sued. The link in the original post is pretty cryptic, but if they’re talking about what I think they’re talking about, it’s about a list of priests in Minneapolic/St. Paul. The list has the names of 90 or so men who the archdiocese itself considers “credibly accused.” A judge ordered the list be made public, so I don’t see how SNAP could be punished for broadcasting such information on its own web site. It may not be responsible conduct, but unless the information was somehow stolen or constitutes libel, I don’t see how they could be sued.

  • Doug Sirman

    Hmmm, I’m not sure that kind of info poses that much danger, but that doesn’t make it right. However, I do believe misrepresenting what is clearly an opinion piece as fact is intentionally deceptive. This is what David Pierre of media report did when he first began his anti-snap, “please buy my book” website. So, if someone like pierre is promoting outrage about something, I’m willing to applaud until a more trustworthy source says otherwise.


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