Weaponized Goon Police in Ferguson, MO

protect the living daylights out of reporters and journalists who were typing very, very dangerously When our police state decides you are allowed to know what they are doing, selected State Information Agents will be permitted to repeat what they are told. Go back to your TV and shopping. Nothing to see here. Move along.

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  • Andy

    In reading about this I was struck by this comment from Huff Post – Washington Bureau Chief – “Compared to some others who have come into contact with the police department, they came out relatively unscathed, but that in no way excuses the false arrest or the militant aggression toward these journalists,” Grim said of Lowery and Reilly. “Ryan, who has reported multiple times from Guantanamo Bay, said that the police resembled soldiers more than officers, and treated those inside the McDonald’s as ‘enemy combatants.’ Police militarization has been among the most consequential and unnoticed developments of our time, and it is now beginning to affect press freedom.” Mark your constant complaints about the new cops being now a military type force are becoming more and more obvious, and frankly more frightening. It smacks of the Roman Empire towards it end – lots of circuses (pro and college sports as well as the larger then life media stars), leaders looking out only for themselves and relying on an more forceful military(police) to control things. We all know where this ends – it is time for men and women of good faith to come together (platitude, I know) and actually practice solidarity and pray.

  • Mark S. (not for Shea)

    Looks like the South hasn’t really changed all that much after all. Sad.

    • jroberts548

      Looks like “the South” extends to whatever borders Yankees want it to for purposes of trashing the “the South.” Missouri didn’t secede. They don’t have the same accent. They only joined the SEC last year.

      Following the Oscar Grant murder, was Oakland part of the South too?

      • Mark S. (not for Shea)

        If it’s south of the Mason-Dixon line and east of Texas, and if it gets less than 12 inches of snow each winter, and if they put sugar in their iced tea, then it’s “the South.”

        • Heather

          Unsweetened iced tea is weird, unless it’s fancy artisanal tea from a tea boutique or whatever. You barbaric unsweetened iced tea drinkers in the northern US are actually surrounded, because we drink our iced tea sweetened like civilized people up here in Canada too.

          Back to serious matters, the mess in Ferguson was on the news this morning here. What an ugly situation. I pray it is resolved soon.

          • Mark S. (not for Shea)

            “Sweet tea” is just “brown Kool Aid.” Fine if you’re eight years old. But adults like to actually taste the tea, not the sugar.

            • Bill

              I don’t particularly care for iced tea at all, unless it’s peach or raspberry.

              • Rebecca Fuentes

                Try mint and black tea combined and iced–but none of that sweet stuff.

        • jroberts548

          http://bit.ly/1l68SC7

          So, you admit that Missouri is not the South.

          • Mark S. (not for Shea)

            I do not. Because I mean “the South” as a culture, not as cognate with “the Confederacy.” I’ve been to Missouri. It’s the South. It’s a border/transition area I’ll grant you, but Missouri is more “South” than “Midwest” in most communities.

            • jroberts548

              This isn’t a frivolous point. As long as Yankees see stories like this, and pin the blame on the South, we’re not going to see solutions. America’s big cities, including those outside the South, are super segregated. Yankee police everywhere from Seattle to New York, routinely use excessive force against Blacks and otherwise discriminate against them. Every segregated metro area is a powder keg.

              But fine, just create whatever bullshit borders you want for “the South” so that you can treat a national problem as something that only affects one region of the country.

              Why not go one step further? Every time something bad happens in America, we’ll decide that that city is temporarily part of Mexico. That way, problems that affect every large metro area in America magically become issues we don’t have to worry about.

              • Pete the Greek

                “Every segregated metro area is a powder keg.”
                – DING DING DING! Give the man a cookie!

                • Peggy

                  Yes, this is an “urban” situation, not “southern.” I have no idea how segregated StL is. When I moved back I thought it bizarre how obsessed with black-white racial concerns this area was. Move on, people. I had lived in multi-culti DC for several years.

                  • jroberts548

                    http://www.businessinsider.com/most-segregated-cities-census-maps-2013-4?op=1

                    St. Louis is one of the most segregated metro areas in the country. People will move on when St. Louis stops being segregated.

                    • Peggy

                      Surely people are allowed to live where they want.

                    • Pete the Greek

                      Segregation in this case doesn’t mean that the government is forcing people not to mingle. As hard as it may be for some to understand, most people people prefer to live among others who share most cultural characteristics with them. A very LOOSE natural segregation usually sets in.

                      Add to this ‘white flight’, gentrification, crime concentration and you get a loose segregation rather quickly.

                    • Peggy

                      SHocked I tell you! Shocked!

                    • jroberts548

                      And when you add redlining, etc. to that “loose segregation,” you get hard segregation.

                    • Benjamin2.0

                      When redlining is added, we’ll let you know.

                    • jroberts548

                      It already happened.

                    • Benjamin2.0

                      Need some more info, sir. The past tense just makes me think it’s a pre civil rights thing.

                    • jroberts548

                      It mostly was. The segregated neighborhoods are still there, and they’re still de facto segregated. It’s much easier to create segregated neighborhoods than to fix them.

                      And, once those segregated neighborhoods exist, it’s really easy to reinforce them, through schools, zoning, etc.

                    • Benjamin2.0

                      Errr… So you’re saying something that happened in the 50’s is relevant to the morality of current behavior? Is it wrong for people to choose particular neighborhoods? If this weren’t an ongoing, willful “loose segregation,” it’d be over by now. People can move wherever they want these days.

                    • jroberts548

                      I didn’t say anything about morality. I said that segregated metro areas are powder kegs, that segregation was caused by the government, rather than the free market; and that that segregation, having not been corrected, still persists.

                      But come on. The city of Ferguson is about 2/3 Black. Their police department is about 6% Black. Do you seriously thing that segregation and discrimination don’t have anything to do with this?

                    • Benjamin2.0

                      Is it the government’s role to correct it? Should people be moved against their will? Should incentives be used? Should property prices in “white neighborhoods” be artificially inflated for white buyers and artificially lowered for less-white buyers? Is there a possible solution which isn’t draconian and fundamentally racist? How, exactly, is “loosely segregated” community a determining factor for race hatred? Isn’t one of the the same cultural influences which drives willful segregation the same cultural influence at fault? Perhaps you’re approaching the problem a step too far up the chain. Forcing allegedly mutually racist groups to desegregate would cause more problems than it solves.

                    • jroberts548

                      1. It wasn’t the government’s role to create it in the first place.

                      2. There’s lots of things the government can do without forcing people to move. They could, for instance, loosen the zoning restrictions that are designed to create homogenous neighborhoods. They could redraw the school districts. They could do metropoilitan-area-wide school funding, so that people in the government created Black districts aren’t stuck with underfunded schools.

                      3. Most people aren’t explicitly racist (though, 5 and a half years ago, I would have said that very few white people were explicitly racist). Not many white people are looking specifically for white areas to move to. But they are looking for things like good schools, etc. But the neighborhoods, from which the school districts are formed, were formed by discriminatory housing policies. So if you’re looking for good schools, you’re looking for a white neighborhood. If you’re looking for a neighborhood that feels safe, you’re looking for one that doesn’t have a lot of dense apartments. Because the zoning laws were written a while ago with the express purpose of discrimination, guess which neighborhoods have strict area, frontage, and setback requirements, and which ones have high density apartments?

                      And that’s only considering the unintentional ways in which segregation persists.

                    • Benjamin2.0

                      Hmmm. Looser zoning. I have to say, that’s a pretty innocuous solution. I’d vote for it. Rezoning schools would be a bit trickier. People chose their neighborhoods on the basis of schooling, as you said.

                    • jroberts548

                      FHA redlining. Restrictive covenants. Zoning.

                      Segregation in American cities wasn’t an accident. it wasn’t the result of the free market. It was the result of government activity.

            • jroberts548

              Heck, Bakersfield is a major center of Country music. Culturally, it has more in common with Nashville than with L.A. Let’s just extend the South all the way West to include the Central Valley.

            • Peggy

              I am from StL metro. Never heard of “sweet tea” until I lived in Va. Now, all restaurant chains offer it nationwide. So, we’re homogenized. Never thought of ourselves as southerners here.

              Now, Southern IL near Cairo (pronounced “kay-ro”) is The South. Quite a site of battles for river control during the Civil War.

          • jonnybeeski

            Hey, how was the bar exam?

            • jroberts548

              It went okay. I feel pretty good about it. Results aren’t released till the end of October.

              • jonnybeeski

                If law school prepares you for anything, it is to take the bar exam. All the best.

        • http://bloggoliard.wordpress.com/ Blog Goliard

          When I lived in Virginia, I learned that the divide between sweet tea and unsweet tea was not a geographic one, but a class one. At least around Richmond.

      • Kristen inDallas

        you had me at SEC.

      • Paul

        It’s not frivolous to claim that Missouri is the south. It had slavery. It was a border state. Its citizens joined both the union and confederate armies. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missouri_in_the_Civil_War

      • Paul

        Also, St. Louis is south of the Mason-Dixon line.

  • AquinasMan

    I saw some Tweets yesterday from Afghan/Iraq vets who were absolutely gobsmacked by how heavily outfitted these cops are — they weren’t carrying loads like that in the war zone.

  • Andy

    While getting ready for the new semester this song came up on Pandora – it seems appropriate somehow

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYRBHpW2GBA

  • Peggy

    The cops wanted the reporters to exit the McD’s with every one else. They were released with no charges pressed. I guess you’ve missed the malatov cocktails and brick throwing that were reported on last night. And the inciting of violence by New Black Panthers. Read beyond the headlines. This is a powder keg. This town is on fire. And this liberal group Anonymous is making many threats against the police dept and their families. Nice.

    I’ll be honest. I do not like the mililarized police state either, but if this starts moving along the interstate to my suburb of StL, I’ll be damned happy to have one of those loaded tanks at the roads coming into my town and subdivision.

    MO Gov should call in the national guard. And IL Gov Quinn should be monitoring St Clair Co.

    We’re feeling on edge a bit here in StL metro. There’s a thin veneer of civility in American society that’s peeling away–fast in this situation.

    • chezami

      There were reporters in hot zones in Iraq and on the beach at Okinawa. It is bullshit that they are being banned “for safety” by the goons in Ferguson.

      • Peggy

        They were asked to evacuate with all others. I don’t know whether the general evac was necessary, however.

    • Elaine S.

      “And IL Gov Quinn should be monitoring St Clair Co.”

      He’s too busy monitoring Bruce Rauner’s (his GOP challenger) investment strategies to care whether the Metro East goes up in flames, I suppose….

    • Benjamin2.0

      I’m giving you the high-five today, and it’s not just because you’re a fellow St. Louisan.

      • Peggy

        I didnt’ see this until just now! Thanks! Stay safe! Go Cards!

  • Peggy

    I believe it is Gov Nixon of MO who is now speaking on my radio, KMOX, to the public in Ferguson. He is speaking to a black religious coalition, I understand. I think there’ll be a change in security situation. “operationally” “different tone.” He is calling for calm and lawfulness. A do-nothing gov finally does something useful. Oh boy he was on the phone with Barry….Barry’s supposed to speak soon.

    • chezami

      About damn time.