Christian Persecution: Deadly Car Bombs Terrorize Christians in Damascus

Damascus, Syria, Nov 30, 2012 / 02:05 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Two deadly car bombs that exploded in a Damascus suburb Nov. 28 killed at least 34 people and are “terrorizing” the Christian population, a local priest says.

Father Romualdo Fernandez, rector of the Damascene Shrine of the Conversion of St. Paul, told Fides news agency that the “massacre” has “spread terrible panic” and some schools report that half the teachers were absent the day after the attack.

“(W)hoever are the people behind the crime, if the aim was to terrorize the Christians, they are succeeding,” Fr. Fernandez said.

Two bombs exploded in the eastern suburb of Jaramana, a district loyal to Syria’s President Bashar Assad. The car bombs exploded within five minutes of each other in a parking lot between two commercial buildings, killing and wounding laborers and employees.

“The attack had been prepared to kill as many people as possible: when the first car bomb exploded, people approached, and only then the second bomb exploded,” Fr. Nicholas Haddad of the Greek-Catholic monastery of San Germano told Fides. (Read more here.)

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  • Bill S

    When I see things like this happening, I can’t help but regret that these people have any religion at all. They would fare much better just relying on their survival instincts, common sense and any sense of empathy and compassion that they could muster up without religious instruction. As John Lennon sang: “…nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too. Imagine all the people living life in peace.” He was singing about having no countries but he added “and no religion too” which is typically deleted or replace with other words when religious people sing the song.

    We tend to put this under “Christian Persecution” but it more appropriately put under “religious fanaticism” because it is not being done by a government (I hope).

    • Bill S

      Rebecca. Please delete the first posting of this and keep the second. I accidentally sent it twice when I tried to make a correction after sending it the first time.

  • Bill S

    When I see things like this happening, I can’t help but regret that these people have any religion at all. They would fare much better just relying on their survival instincts, common sense and any sense of empathy and compassion that they could muster up without religious instruction. As John Lennon sang: “…nothing to kill or die for, and no religion too. Imagine all the people living life in peace.” He was singing about having no countries but he added “and no religion too” which is typically deleted or replace with other words when religious people sing the song.

    We tend to put this under “Christian Persecution” but it is more appropriately put under “religious fanaticism” because it is not being done by a government (I hope).

    • Ted Seeber

      In the case of Islamic extremeists, their theology is MUCH closer to quantum mechanics than it is to Christianity. They *ARE* practicing no logical religion at all.

      It is their survival instinct that is causing the violence to begin with.

      Some other sects of Islam are much more tolerant. But for the most part, those sects were minimized and persecuted even in Islamic society.

      • Bill S

        “It is their survival instinct that is causing the violence to begin with.”

        Survival as a people, or as a religion? If it is as a people, something has gone haywire.

        Islam used to be a tolerant religion. Before Ferdinand and Isabella drove them out of Spain, Muslims and Jews lived in harmony with Christians. Except for the fanatical Moors who intimidated moderate Muslims.


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