Department of Homeland Security Tells Romeike Family “You Can Stay”

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It appears that the Romeike family will be staying in the United States, after all.

Their story revolves around issues of religious freedom and the rights of parents to educate their children in their faith. The Romeikes elected to homeschool their children due to a desire to educate them in their Christian beliefs. Germany’s law evidently requires all children to attend public or state-approved schools. There are no exceptions for family home schools or facilities that group together to hire a tutor and provide a group homeschool.

The Romeikes elected to homesechool their children in a Christian-based family homeschool, anyway. When the government threatened to seize their children, they came to the United States, seeking asylum. They moved to Tennessee and applied for citizenship and immigration status.

According to CNN,

An immigration judge initially granted their request in 2010 to the Romeikes and their children, saying they were “members of a particular social group” and would be punished for their religious beliefs if returned.

But the Justice Department revoked it last year.

The Board of Immigration Appeals concluded homeschoolers are too ‘amorphous” to constitute a social group eligible for protection under the asylum law.Yesterday, the United States Supreme Court refused to hear their appeal, effectively ending court based action on their situation.

The Homeschool Legal Defense Association announced today that the Department of Homeland Security has granted the family “indefinite deferred action status.” I am not familiar with this term, but based on what the HSDLA’s website says, it sounds as if the family can continue to stay in this country.

This video tells the family’s story.  It’s a reminder of just how good we have it, and what freedoms we possess here in the United States. It is also an encouragement to us to stand up for our rights and work to keep them.

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  • SisterCynthia

    Well, this is good news, tho if I were them I wouldn’t feel too good about being here only because the powers decided to currently decline to deport them. I hope they can get on the citizen track ASAP, if they aren’t already.

  • Gordis85

    A very good video but one that gives me chills and a sense of uncertainty for the future of America’s youth. So many have become complacent and do not care as long as Big Brother pays their bills, their housing, their birth control, and are fed.
    My nieces and nephews are well educated, all in their early twenties but their mind set is that they have no problem with big government dictating what we can and can’t do. They think I’m old fashion because I rail against all the current stuff that they find acceptable…to make it even more sad, they have all left the faith.

    I hope this family can truly stay here and enjoy their freedom but they will have to keep watch since one never knows. I will remember them in my prayers.

  • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

    That’s great, and I’m happy for them. I wanted them to stay. But may I ask. How does the Homeland Security agency have the authority to do this? Sounds like beurocracy out of control.

  • Bill S

    It is not certain whether Christian beliefs are actually true or actually false. If it turns out that they are true, then homeschooled children are getting a great education and public school children are not. However, if on the other hand Christian beliefs turn out to be false, then these parents are doing a tremendous disservice to their children and to this country. One of many examples would be the attitude against gays that these children are being instilled with. Brainwashed Christians think that homosexuality is just about the worst thing that has ever happened to the human race. On the other hand, those not brainwashed with Christian beliefs are learning tolerance and acceptance. And that is the way it seems to be with many other issues as well.

    • hamiltonr

      Bill, this is claptrap. Homeschool children get a great education, regardless of the religious leanings of their parents. My kids — who were homeschooled — are on the president’s honor roll at college. They also have a solid grounding in the faith.

      • Bill S

        Yes. You probably are a much better teacher than they would have in public schools. Problem now is that you have brainwashed them to be hard core Catholics and they may have problems getting along with people in the secular world. Some of that is tongue in cheek. Don’t get riled up.

        • hamiltonr

          I’m not riled. Just smiling at your inaccurate assumptions.

    • SisterCynthia

      Basically, you are in favor of brainwashing children into YOUR (literally) godless beliefs, undermining their parents’ authority to teach them, because you personally dislike the ethics, morality, and beliefs of those parents. It sounds like in your ideal world, the child doesn’t belong to their parents, but rather is really the property of the State, and the State may impose its own currently fashionable set of beliefs onto them, “for the benefit of the collective.” If that is the State’s prerogative, then you have no qualms with the indoctrination of youth performed by such States as Nazi Germany or Communist Bloc countries? Or do you now say that those states were teaching wrong doctrines? And on what grounds can you say that, other than “you dislike them” and “many people feel this way” and “those views aren’t something I agree with, so they have to be invalid”? It was what the collective wanted, for the common good, as understood by those in power, minority opinions be damned, which is what you are advocating occur here because it suits your purpose, to turn the children of those you can’t “re-educate” into copies of yourself, to end the passing along of beliefs you don’t like and to shatter the most enduring bonds between parents and children by teaching children to despise their parents as antiquated fools. That’s pretty strong stuff to be pushing for.

    • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

      At least you phrased it either or this time Bill and your typical prideful pronouncement was only suggested. That’s a start.

  • Fabio Paolo Barbieri

    One thing that should perhaps be kept into account by anyone who discusses this matter, from whatever viewpoint, is that homeschooling is virutally unknown in continental Europe. It is an entirely Anglo-Saxon concept, and curiously enough, while in the USA it is associated with Christianity and conservatism, in England it has a lefty-beardy image. Both countries, however, have a mental slot for it, know what it is, and can make allowances for a family that wishes to practice it. In continental Europe, however, it s something like the world turned upside down. There are no laws for it, no precedents, no notion of what it is supposed to do, no social networks of parents, no textbooks intended for the market. The Romeikes (like another family that is going through a similar calvary in Sweden) imported the idea from the United States along with their American-type evangelical religion. (In Germany “Evangelisch” means Lutheran, and that is the most state-oriented and state-dominated of traditions), and American evangelicalism itself has a very bad image in both Catholic and Protestant Europe. That is to explain the wholly uncomprehending and wholly negative attitude of the German state. Supporters of the Romeikes kept saying that the laws used against them went back to Nazi times, but I am certain that legislation either earlier or later would have had the same effect. In my country, one only keeps a child from school for the gravest possible reasons, and even so one has to show what they are.


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