Dr Alveda King, Niece of Martin Luther King, for Marriage

I was honored to meet Dr Alveda King when she was in Oklahoma for our annual pro-life event at the state capitol, Rose Day.

Dr King is a Pastoral Associate and Director of African-American Outreach for Priests for Life.

She is the niece of Dr Martin Luther King, Jr, and the daughter of his brother, Reverend AD King. Her mother is Naomi Barber King.

Her family home in Birmingham, Al was bombed during the Civil Rights Movement, as was her father’s church in Louisville, Ky. Alveda was jailed for her Civil Rights activities. she is the author of How Can the Dream Survive If We Murder the Children? 

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  • SisterCynthia

    The title of her book is a rather good one. Glad you got to meet her.

    • hamiltonr

      I was, as I said, honored to meet her.

  • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

    I’ve seen her on a lot of issues that catholics are in agreement with. Did she convert to Catholicism or is it just mutual agreement on various controversies?

  • http://ashesfromburntroses.blogspot.com/ Manny

    By the way, Mollie Hemingway has a great piece on marriage at The Federalist. Worth the read:

    http://thefederalist.com/2014/04/08/the-rise-of-the-same-sex-marriage-dissidents/#disqus_thread

  • pagansister

    I was a citizen of Alabama during that time—

  • Alvaro Fidel Martinez

    You know, as a child of divorced parents, I always get uncomfortable when divorced people speak against gay marriage — in this case, Alveda King.

    Don’t get me wrong — I’m opposed to same-gender marriage. However, as someone with past tragedies who has matured a lot, and as a practicing Mennonite, I always try to be consistent and CONGRUENT. Sometimes, my consistency can be a bit of a burden.

    I understand that Alveda has made many mistakes (i.e. married three times, three abortions). I’m not trying to judge Alveda, because we’re all human, and we ALL fall short of the Glory of God.

    But as someone who hasn’t seen his father in TWENTY years, I’d rather we get people who haven’t broken their marriage vows multiple times; I think it would be preferable to get folks who are in stable marriages and have happy families.

    It’s a very personal thing, because I lost my father, and thus I want to ensure my children never grow up without their daddy.

    But that’s just my two cents.


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