September 21, 2017

How can a nation that claims to be founded on religious freedoms, and that many calls a Christian nation, continue to condone the death penalty? Read more

September 19, 2017

by Derrick Holmes This first appeared at Are You Up Yet? Growing up in the Bronx, New York, I was raised for the majority of my formative years by my grandparents.  My grandfather (Lord, bless his soul) was a very stern and serious man. Both intelligent and compassionate, much of what I have learned about what it means to be a man, I take from him. But, despite this model of merit that I had the privilege of being parented… Read more

September 19, 2017

If we believe that black lives matter, we must also realize black feelings matter. Read more

September 6, 2017

From the Mountain Top and Beyond: Contemporary Meanings and Understandings of the Rhetoric of Martin Luther King Jr., 50 Years Later The Journal of Contemporary Rhetoric is planning a Special Issue titled “From the Mountain Top and Beyond: Contemporary Meanings and Understandings of the Rhetoric of Martin Luther King Jr., 50 Years Later. In this special issue, we seek essays not only grounded in the rhetoric of King but those that point to King’s legacy 50 years later after his… Read more

September 4, 2017

On September 9, 1868, the Atlanta Constitution published a portion of a speech that Henry McNeal Turner was to deliver on the floor of the Georgia House of Representatives. In the speech, Turner was to advocate for the “eight hour bill” pending before the House.  In submitting the speech for publication, Turner noted that the speech itself was not completed and several of his strongest points “had not been made.” However when he learned that the House intended to vote… Read more

August 24, 2017

The R3 book series is pleased to announce the publication of The Motif of Hope in African American Preaching during Slavery and the Post-Civil War Era: There’s a Bright Side Somewhere by Wayne Croft. Pre-order your copy today!  About the Book: The Motif of Hope in African American Preaching during Slavery and the Post-Civil War Era: There’s a Bright Side Somewhere explores the use of the motif of hope within African American preaching during slavery (1803–1865) and the post-Civil War era (1865–1896)…. Read more

August 19, 2017

On Wednesday August 16, 2017, I was a special guest on radio station 1340 WLOK’s Let’s Talk About It with Twana Coleman. We discussed the tragedy in Charlottesville and our own campaign (#TakeEmDown901) here in Memphis to take down the statues honoring heroes of the confederacy. We also asked the question, are conservatives and White nationalists the same on policy initiatives?     Read more

August 15, 2017

by Stephen Ray We must remember history rightly for the sake of our children. I suspect that the events of Charlottesville, VA in these past few days will be remembered by history as the opening salvo in the long-simmering prelude to the conclusion of the Civil War. We have been taken by history to the precipice from which we plunge either into the night of the worst demons of our history and malice or alight to the bright horizons of… Read more

August 15, 2017

The concept of white fragility is why white church leaders are less likely than black church leaders to speak out against racial injustice. Read more

August 13, 2017

by Jayanni Webster As a labor organizer for a higher education union, I feel it’s important to draw attention to the fact that our college and university campuses have become notable spaces for contestation by white supremacists / white nationalists. Perhaps it’s always been this way, right? But we cannot ignore the university and college as an important site to defend in this moment. We cannot ignore that many campuses are experiencing for the first time public and vivid propaganda… Read more

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