Mommy Russia Dearest

That title doesn’t make any sense, but at least it doesn’t have a typo, which my  original entry on Inside Catholic did (yeah yeah, I fixed it).  Check it out, and thanks to always-alert Sarah Breisch for the idea.

Seriously:  is this any way to say “good morning,” even in Russian?

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  • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/simchafisher Simcha Fisher

    Now taking bets: which phrase will offend IC readers the most? “Cold and wretched land?” Or “nice warm blini”?

  • http://suburbancorrespondent.blogspot.com/ suburbancorrespondent

    Why would either of those phrases offend IC readers?! Fun news bit – thanks for sharing!

    • http://www.patheos.com/blogs/simchafisher Simcha Fisher

      Ohhh, 99% of the readers there are bright and humorous, but there’s always that 1% who see everything as an affront to decency. I was just kidding about the “blinis,” though.

  • Suzanne

    While transferring in Times Square every morning I used to read this poem, which is still there:

    Overslept,

    So tired

    If late

    Get fired

    Why bother?

    Why the pain?

    Just go home

    Do it again

  • Devra

    I hope they don’t do Anna Karenina throwing herself under the train next.

  • Nzie

    I worked last year in Moscow and am returning in September and Russia can certainly be quite cold – and if I had to live in that without an umbrella in fall I’d certainly feel pretty wretched, but why anyone would be offended at the wonderfulness that are blini is beyond me. :) As for Anna Karenina, I don’t think they have a Tolstoy station – they have ones for Pushkin and Chekhov and a few other writers, but since Tolstoy viewed the train as a symbol for the evil of progress, not holding my breath. A friend of mine took photos this summer of this station and I think it’s quite beautiful – especially compared to the rather plain wood carvings in my station. :)


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