We Are Young (All Things Go, All Things Go)

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“Rats, cats, raccoons, foxes, possums … they all love them some pigeon.”

Beer and cheese, while delicious, both slough off a lot of gas while they’re being made.”

“The War of 1812 has complicated origins, a confusing course, an inconclusive outcome, and demands at least a cursory understanding of Canadian geography.”

“People are more morally lax after they look at a brownie for a while.”

In the end this is not a scientific survey. It’s a random survey.”

A decades-long campaign of deception has loaded the furniture and electronics in American homes with pounds of toxic chemicals linked to cancer, neurological deficits, developmental problems and impaired fertility.”

“I guess every day is more or less the same in the coal industry.”

“America has about 5 percent of the world’s population but almost 25 percent of its prisoners, with the world’s largest number of inmates and highest per capita rate of incarceration.”

“He dropped the role of vice president and became just one among many survivor group participants.”

“35 years going at least once a week, and up to four times a week, to a place where people meet who have dedicated their lives to following Christ. Yet after all of those years, I still don’t know how to respond to poverty.”

“The strategy here, as in the past, is to make the Republican political ideology into Christian principles — to amalgamate both into a single religio-political ideology.”

You do realize you people are making up a new religion, right?

Prejudice is a kind of cartel that works best when there is no real dissent.”

“Peter and Jesus offer a strikingly inclusive form of love and engagement.”

“‘Ne fides rideatur,’ St. Thomas Aquinas said. Literally, ‘Don’t let the faith be laughed at.’”

“Romans 1 is the only text in the Bible that directly speaks to the subject, and it appears that even this passage must be read carefully and interpreted in its context.”

Unladylike Manifesto

Hemant Mehta’s (excellent) “Advice for High School Graduates

M. McShea responds to the latest aggrieved statement from the U.S. Catholic bishops about … Zzzzzz.

(The big swoop into the chorus of Fun’s inescapable single “We Are Young” reminds me a bit of the orchestral pop in Sufjan Stevens’ “Chicago.” Or, at least, it reminds me of it enough to use as an excuse to post the video above.)

  • Tricksterson

    Wingrat, it’s what’s for dinner.

    The War of 1812 (misnamed since it lasted three years) was arguably the most important in our history (and Canada;s) except for the Revolution itself precisely because it ended in a draw.  It was Basically the Revoltion The Rematch so if we’d lost, we probably would have ceased to exist as a country.  If we’d won then more than likely Canada wouldn’t exist as a country.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    That article about Joe Biden? *thumbs up*

    The man’s level of awesome continues to rise.

  • Jessica_R

    I was seriously shocked, in a good way, to see a national level politician be that vulnerable and honest. Who knew Biden would turn out to be the Obama Administration’s ace in the hole in many ways?

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    I certainly don’t want people who have signed up for conservative civil religion to sign up for a more liberal civil religion, because neither will bring you to the kingdom of God and thus neither will change the world. 

    This is a smart person saying a smart thing? Really?

    The kingdom of God has demonstrably not come and yet the world changes all the time, for better and for worse. That hurt actual people and help actual people. The idea that we have to have this “kingdom of God” to change the world, to reach an unreachable, unattainable (and specifically Christian) perfection before anything else matters, is utterly ludicrous and the absolute opposite of smart.

    Silly me, I care about political parties because I care about myself and other women being treated as human beings, I care that people are stealing from the poor to further enrich the wealthy, I care about justice in THIS world, I care about the environment, I care about, you know, real stuff. Helping people who are hungry, cold, sick, in prison. Not sitting on some blogging mountaintop, warm, well, fully clothed, prattling on about how stuff that actually affects people in this very real world we live in doesn’t matter.

  • Tybult

    Suddenly, overindulging in beer and cheese isn’t just a fun state pastime: It’s your civic duty for promoting environmentalism and health care.

    Well, overindulging in beer and cheese promotes health care in more than one way. (In that a couple of decades of high cholesterol and sedentary behavior leads to expensive medical treatments.)

    Thus sayeth a fellow beer- and cheese-lover.

  • Tybult

    A decades-long campaign of deception has loaded the furniture and electronics in American homes with pounds of toxic chemicals linked to cancer, neurological deficits, developmental problems and impaired fertility.

    So the next time some jerk tries to tell me reality is awesome, I can reply, “Yeah, except for that one time the fucking Ferengi stuffed my apartment full of carcinogens.”

  • alfgifu

    The War of 1812 (misnamed since it lasted three years) was arguably the most important in our history (and Canada;s) except for the Revolution itself precisely because it ended in a draw.  It was Basically the Revoltion The Rematch so if we’d lost, we probably would have ceased to exist as a country.  If we’d won then more than likely Canada wouldn’t exist as a country.

    You may be right about the outcome if there had been a more decisive victory for either side; I don’t know that much about the details of the war.  But it seems unlikely that the British would have thought the game worth the candle, even with the prospect of reabsorbing America as a colony.  When you’re locked in a global war to the death with Napoleon, anything that ties up only one or two little fleets and armies is an annoying minor scuffle.  Even when the American Navy proved its worth and started sinking ships, it may have been a humiliating and infuriating loss of assets but it just couldn’t compare in urgency to the French situation.

    It’s strange how perspectives change, isn’t it?

    Nowadays, of course, only historians with an interest in the C19th are likely to have heard of the war at all.  I suspect that’s because my fellow Britons are still rather put out that we suffered such setbacks when we were supposed to be Ruling the Waves, and would prefer not to think about it.  Even those who do remember are far more likely to cite the Shannon vs. the Chesapeake than the burning of Washington.  Dwelling exclusively on past glories: this is a thing we can do.

    Any Slacktivites got a Canadian perspective?  Mmy, perhaps?

  • Mau de Katt

     

    And this is a grim video of a hawk chewing on a pigeon while the poor thing is still alive. Nature: It ain’t pretty!

    First — that hawk would probably have killed the pigeon a lot faster if it wasn’t worried about all the lookie-loos stealing its prey.  It was clearly trying to protect its kill in addition to eating it.

    Second — all those people laughing at the poor doomed slowly-being-ripped-to-pieces pigeon’s struggles?

    Gahhhh.  I really hate my species some times.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I am also Canadian mmkay :P

    The War of 1812 is generally taught (from our perspective) as a “Canada won the War of 1812″. :)

    There was someone on Slacktivist who nitpicked mmy harshly over that (“lol Canada didn’t exist then it was the British”), and she took great exception and umbrage. I agree with her because as with her, I am steeped in a tradition where Canadians are the direct cultural inheritors of the British and French presences on this continent. We are the ones who can claim the achievements (and dishonors) that our ancestors have wrought.

    In a sense the War of 1812 crystallized the beginnings of our identity as a nation separate from Britain, and the revolutions of 1837 and 1838 were another step forward from that. But it all began, I think, with proving that we could repel a country we have always been a little uneasy about. :)

  • hapax

    There’s a great Canadian song about the War of 1812, something about burning down the White House and being ready to do it again. 

    I’ve been trying in a desultory fashion to track it down, but it isn’t easy without either a performer or any of the lyrics.

    Does anybody have a clue what I’m thinking of?

  • http://redwoodr.tumblr.com Redwood Rhiadra

    You’re looking for “The War of 1812″, by The Arrogant Worms (a great Canadian group). One video (unofficial) is here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ety2FEHQgwM

  • GDwarf

    Yeah, the Canadian perspective is that we won the war of 1812. The US tried to invade us and we repulsed them. Repeatedly. It’s also cited as one of the big first moments of integration between French and English Canada, since residents of Quebec refused to side with the US, feeling that they’d get a better deal from the British.

    The US perspective is that they won because it wasn’t about conquering Canada but about convincing the British to leave them alone, which they did.

    I’m rather surprised by that Slate article noting that the war is a minor thing in the US. It’s huge in Canada, you hear about it in every Canadian history class and it’s considered one of our proudest military moments, second probably only to Vimy Ridge in WWII.

  • http://from1angle.wordpress.com emilyperson

    The War of 1812 was covered in my eighth grade American history class five years ago. Granted, it was about as nuanced and in-depth an account as you’d expect from a class filled with thirteen-year-olds, but my sister said when she got to APUSH in high school the teacher discussed it in more detail. This is Southeast Michigan, so it might be a regional thing, but most of the people I know have at least heard of it.

  • John__K

     Could be the anti-Palin? Palin was hyped very early on as a brilliant conservative firebrand who would help McCain solidify the base and win the election. Biden was hyped as a walking gaffe-machine who would fumble every debate and cost Obama an election that was his to win. But Palin’s firebrand nature alienated many moderates that McCain actually relied upon during his primaries and Biden’s “gaffes” have often been, well, the right thing to say.

    (I still can’t see how coming in support of gay marriage could be considered a ‘gaffe’ even in a strictly pragmatic. Obama might be hedging his bets, but I really don’t see him losing the election because he publicly states a belief that is common among his supporters and that most people already suspected he had in the first place).

  • http://apolarity.com/ Adrenalin Tim

    This is a smart person saying a smart thing? Really?

    I don’t read these link-dump threads as having quite the same level of Fred’s endorsement as the SPSST threads.

  • Lori

    Biden was hyped as a walking gaffe-machine who would fumble every debate and cost Obama an election that was his to win. 

    I always figured that this A) wasn’t as big a danger as some people made it out to be and B) could easily be dealt with by having Biden do more personal appearances and less press.

    I’ve never known any major office-holder well, but in one way or another I’ve met quite a few in passing. Of them, Biden definitely left a better impression than most. In person he just comes across well, like he’s a decent person. That’s certainly not true of many politicians I’ve met. (As an example, I think John Edwards’ message about the “two America’s” was true and that we would be in a better position now if he had had more success in pushing that message. However, I wasn’t exactly shocked to find out that he’s a fairly lousy human being on a personal level. I met him once and he set of the asshat detector in a major way.)

  • hapax

    You’re looking for “The War of 1812″, by The Arrogant Worms

     YES!  Thank you!

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Bill Clinton’s personal charisma is still in evidence, apparently, since Barack Obama’s campaign has openly enlisted Clinton to make appearances with Obama. :)

    The troika of awesome cannot be defeated. :P

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    The perspective of the War of 1812 that I learned in my U.S. college is that the U.S. started the war in order to conquer Canada for utterly mercenary reasons,  and then lost it, thank goodness. But college history is in many ways different from high school history. For one thing, history is so completely de-emphasized in U.S. public schools that most of them don’t have time to even get to the Vietnam War. It’s no wonder the War of 1812 is normally one of the first things to get tossed.


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