GOP rolling out new 50-state strategy for 2014

• Republicans unveil start of nationwide 2014 outreach campaign to attract women voters.

Brian Kilmeade of Fox News does his best to promote the effort.

• Arizona Republicans begin 2014 outreach campaign to attract Latino voters.

• Florida Republicans begin 2014 outreach campaign to attract Muslim voters.

• Maine Republicans begin 2014 outreach campaign to attract minority voters.

• Tennessee Republicans begin 2014 outreach campaign to attract women voters.

  • Becca Stareyes

    I could also imagine registering as a Republican if one lives in a red state that had closed primaries as a way of damage control in the primaries — basically to pick the least objectionable candidate since the Democratic candidate is at a handicap and generally push the party away from ‘party of angry straight white Christians and rich people’.  I don’t think a person like that would identify as a Republican, though, despite what it says on their voer registration. 

    I’m not sure it would be worth the spam.  I already get enough spam from various Democratic organizations (as a Democrat who occasionally donates money and signs petitions) and even then it usually ends up in the trash bin. 

  • Lori

    I fully expect Huntsman to be primaried out as a RINO if he chooses to run again for his current office — if he doesn’t drink the Kool-Aid to save his chances.   

    I assume he has no intention of running again. That seems the most likely explanation for him saying straight up that he believes in both evolution and global warming and then cracking a joke about his fellow Republicans who don’t. [standard disclaimer about how people really shouldn't use "crazy" that
    way]

    https://twitter.com/JonHuntsman/status/104250677051654144

  • Madhabmatics

     Yeah I think the key thing was the “Well I asked my friends and none of them recognized them!” I live in the rural south in a p. small town with a huge black population and even here, if you asked a random white person “yo do you know any black people here” you’d likely get confused stares.

  • P J Evans

     If your father had fought in the Civil War would you still have been voting GOP in the 1950s because of that?

    That’s why there are so many Republicans in places like Kansas – their grandfathers and great-grandfathers were Civil War veterans who voted ‘party of Lincoln’, and nobody noticed the changes.
    Heck, my mother was registered as a Republican because of that (although she’d stopped voting for them about 1965); in 1980, when she told one of her older family members that she’d changed her registration to D, said family member’s response was ‘your father would be turning over in his grave’. (My mother’s answer to that was that someone would have to go out and pat down the grass.)

  • http://veleda-k.dreamwidth.org/ Veleda

     I’ll admit I’m rather confused by this “you should vote the way your parents would have” thing. My father was a Democratic politician, but if I started voting for racist sexist liars because they had a (D) next to their name, he’d be horribly disappointed in me. I think doing the right thing is a better way to honor his memory than partisanship.

  • http://veleda-k.dreamwidth.org/ Veleda

     I’ll admit I’m rather confused by this “you should vote the way your parents would have” thing. My father was a Democratic politician, but if I started voting for racist sexist liars because they had a (D) next to their name, he’d be horribly disappointed in me. I think doing the right thing is a better way to honor his memory than partisanship.

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    The spam can be entertaining, though. I didn’t register as anything but I got on the Republican list. I should’ve kept the surveys; the questions were classic examples of how to phrase survey questions to get the answers you want.

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    The spam can be entertaining, though. I didn’t register as anything but I got on the Republican list. I should’ve kept the surveys; the questions were classic examples of how to phrase survey questions to get the answers you want.

  • AnonymousSam

    I have a hard time understanding continuing to identify yourself as something you wouldn’t support, though. I assume you vote Democrat now, but consider yourself an old-school Republican at heart?

  • The_L1985

    I looked at the “family values guide” just to remind myself of which people DON’T value families as much as they pretend to. I was even given a flier smearing Senator Nelson and telling me to call and complain. So I called right away to tell Bill Nelson to keep up the good work. :)

  • AnonymousSam

    What state was this? I know some of the Republicans running for Congress in Washington state actually seemed halfway decent. They had an ad campaign for awhile about how they were supporting gay marriage.

  • AnonymousSam

    The same is true of here, but mostly at the local level. The sheriff and county judges are frequently marked as (I), when marked at all. Which is a good thing as far as I’m concerned, since I’m not sure I would want a sheriff or a judge who exhibited political bias.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jrandyowens Randy Owens

    With the caveat that it’s not exactly my business how someone else votes and why, the whole idea of voting a certain way because some ancestor would vote that way seems very anti-democratic (note the small ‘d’).  In effect, it’s giving the ancestor two votes, and taking away your own, which isn’t the way democracies are supposed to work, at all.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charity-Brighton/100002974813787 Charity Brighton

    I think it’s more about just keeping the registration. You can vote however way you like outside of some primaries without changing your registration.

     I do think it would be kind of weird if someone felt morally compelled to vote the same way as they (imagine) their parents would have — obviously you can’t be sure that someone who backed Eisenhower way back when would have voted for Romney today, for example. 

  • BaseDeltaZero

    I’m inclined to give the guy in Maine the benefit of the doubt. If the proportion of (people with X phenotype) you notice voting is double that what you notice in the community, I don’t think it’s racist to consider that suspicious.

    I wouldn’t think it’s racist to consider that unusual.  Suspicion implies malicious intent.  It’s entirely possible that a disproportionately large number of black people voted, but that in no way indicates voter fraud.

    Maybe the root cause is, in fact, that he just didn’t see fit to notice any black people, but that’s not quite as bad as the… thing.  That he’s actually engaging in.

  • Matri

    (My mother’s answer to that was that someone would have to go out and pat down the grass.)

    Your mom rocks, btw.

  • ohiolibrarian

     Huntsman doesn’t have a current office. He used to be a governor but his most recent gig was as Obama’s ambassador to China. I gather he speaks fairly good Mandarin. A Republican with layers. He’ll never go anywhere with the current party.

  • ohiolibrarian

     Actually, not having partisan markers on judges doesn’t mean they aren’t partisan. Both parties endorse judges based on things like business/union friendly, etc.

  • Dan Audy

    I think the guy either doesn’t care to notice the African Americans in his town when he sees them on the street, or doesn’t go to the kind of place where they are.  

    A huge amount of it has to do with economics.  I lived in an area with around 20% of the population being Chinese in background but if you worked a 9-5 job in the area and didn’t take the bus you would rarely if ever see them at the grocery store, on the streets, or at the park because during your off-hours the majority were at work (mostly non customer facing because of language skills) or on a slow and tedious commute home from outside the immediate area.  Someone who didn’t pay attention to demographics or get involved outside their narrow social network (White Evangelicals tend to have few social connections outside of work, church, and church related groups) could quite legitimately think that almost no Chinese lived in the area.

  • WalterC

     If your first reaction when hearing reports of black people voting is to assume that they’re up to something sleazy and very criminal, you’re probably a racist. That’s… kind of a thing. If you think about it, without the racial overtones, there’s really not that much substance to Webster’s remarks.

    Why would Democratic operatives bother shipping in unregistered voters (presumably from out of state) to Maine of all places? As far as presidential politics goes, Maine is pretty much a lock for Democrats as it is; Obama carried it in 2008, Kerry carried it in 2004, Gore carried it in 2000, etc. Neither of their two Senate seats (held by Republicans) were up for election this year, and they have reliably sent Democrats to the House every two years since the mid 1990s. It makes no sense unless you’re the kind of person who just finds black people doing anything at all to be inherently unsavory.

  • AnonymousSam

    Oh, of course, but it’s at least minutely reassuring that the judges themselves don’t boast about political affiliation (if in no other way than sticking it by their name).

  • P J Evans

     I was in a district once with an R representative who sent out questionnaires like that – I think it must have been Congressional because one of the questions was about the Tongass forest. I remember because every effing question had answers carefully written so you had to agree with the party position or not answer at all.

  • P J Evans

     She did, and I still want to call her up and talk.

  • Lori

     Oh yeah, he isn’t currently in office. I had totally forgotten. Wasn’t there talk of him running for something again once the whole “running for president as the sensible guy in a party of whackos” thing didn’t work out? If so, I assume that’s now off the table. Being reality based is not a winning strategy in the national GOP these days.

  • PorlockJunior

     Escher landscape?
    More Brueghel, I’d say.

  • reynard61

    “The GOP is nothing but idiots. Etc., etc., etc.”

    And yet, people still vote for them. Why is that?

  • AnonymousSam

    Well, I’ll put it this way: About two out of every three Republican-leaning citizens in Ohio and North Carolina either give credit to Romney for the death of Osama bin Laden or are completely unsure whether it was he or Obama who had anything to do with it.

    Romney, as you’ll recall, had absolutely nothing to do with the event.

  • reynard61

    @ AnonymousSam: Well, my question was actually meant to be more rhetorical than anything else; but you do certainly make my point. Thanks.

  • Matri

    I blame Fox News which, incidentally, has absolutely nothing to do with news.

    Or foxes.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    About two out of every three Republican-leaning citizens in Ohio and
    North Carolina either give credit to Romney for the death of Osama bin
    Laden or are completely unsure whether it was he or Obama who had
    anything to do with it.

    You’re joking. (O_O)

  • Carstonio

    I suspect that most people who vote based on family tradition vote Republican. I’ve heard of families who teach their kids that Democrats defend working-class interests, but that seems different from the team loyalty shown by the other families. Similarly, I almost never hear of liberals complaining about conservative bias in the media – the complaints about Fox News are about lies and demagoguery and not bias. Folks who favor the GOP seem to really think of politics in terms of allegiances and loyalties, similar to how the party’s foreign policy thinkers see the US as beset by enemies abroad and traitors within.

  • Lori

     

    You’re joking. (O_O)    

    No, he isn’t.

    Reality may have a liberal bias, but perception of reality can be biased in either direction.

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/wonkblog/wp/2012/09/10/do-15-of-ohio-republicans-think-romney-killed-bin-laden-probably-not/

  • Paul Durant

    Similarly, I almost never hear of liberals complaining about conservative bias in the media – the complaints about Fox News are about lies and demagoguery and not bias.

    Man, if you haven’t heard liberals complain of conservative bias in the news, you haven’t heard anyone talk about Occupy Wall Street. The radical sorts never shut up about how the mass media conspiracy has poisoned the minds of the public against the truth and righteousness of their specific brand of Marxism. (Only their specific brand though — every other brand of Marxism is evil and should be purged!)

    They blame the failure of OWS to gain any headway on the mass media conspiracy being aligned against them from the start, and say with the tools of corporate media bearing down on it OWS never had a chance. Instead of realizing it was the efforts of radicals like them that rapidly stripped OWS of any relevance to the 99% it was supposedly representing, changing a sincere outpouring of outrage against the worst excesses of capitalism to another self-indulgent, self-righteous college Communist coffee klatch, and no, that “consensus building” thing you did with the hand signals isn’t a revolutionary new form of governance, it’s the dumbest thing ever.

    This is why I can’t be happy at indications that the GOP is doubling down on madness, even as that same insanity pushes them further and further from relevance. The Republican party’s slow collapse into a neutron star of hateful, entitled insanity is turning into a bad thing for them (finally) and driving voters away, reducing their power and ability to hurt people, but it’s still bad for the country too. We need actual sane, reality-based conservatives. Liberals need opposition from people who are dispassionate, come from a different perspective, maybe even a bit dickish, who will accept intelligent ideas and shoot down stupid ones. With the role of the opposition being filled by wackos who oppose every idea and screaming praises to Khorne, we have to be the check against our own ideas, and it turns out we’re really bad at that. The moderate majority has become paralyzed with indecision, worrying “Oh god, is this really stupid? Are the Republicans right about me? Are people really laughing at me?” The more radical wing has sprinted off into complete dogmatism to ideas that are proven not to work and won’t shut up long enough for new, different radical ideas to arise and be stripped down to their most salient bits by the moderates. 

    What is it going to take to have a sane, fact-based form of conservatism again? I had hoped Santorum would win the nomination instead of Romney, because he’d be obliterated in the election and that might, possibly, maybe make some conservatives realize “hey, we could not possibly move further to the right than this, maybe moving further right isn’t always the answer!” But that didn’t happen, and though Romney was an utterly amoral vessel of greed and selfishness, the far-right can still claim he wasn’t as conservative as he could have been and that’s why they lost. Is there any sort of defeat they can’t rationalize away? Is anything going to force them to face reality, or are we doomed to two more decades of a completely nonfunctional political system?

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

     

    Similarly, I almost never hear of liberals complaining about conservative bias in the media

    I don’t know. I hear a lot of complaints in the news-side of the blogosphere about how traditional media under-covers a lot of liberal causes. There were complaints of the media refusing to cover OWS until it got sufficiently sexy, or failing to cover voter suppression and voter fraud. Or the fact that not a single major news outlet mentioned Taqgg Romney owning the voting machines in Ohio. Or the fact that Petraeus’s dong gets unbounded coverage while the court decision that Donald Rumsfeld is allowed to torture US citizens suspected of being whistleblowers against government wrongdoing went unmentioned. Or that Hurricane Sandy coverage barely mentioned global warming.

    In fact, most of the complaints I hear about how the media is broken these days boil down to “The media is entirely beholden to corporate interests and won’t cover anything unless their right-leaning corporate masters approve.” (“how the media is broken” here being a specific class of complaints, not the totality of them)

  • DavidCheatham

    Why would Democratic operatives bother shipping in unregistered voters (presumably from out of state) to Maine of all places?

    And why would they use _black_ people for that?

    I really wish there was a good name for the anti-conspiracy-theory filter that I, and a lot of other people, run conspiracy theories through. Basically: Let’s start by assuming that the people in the story are, indeed, as evil as claimed, and that they wish to get to the goal claimed. Is the _stated method_ a reasonable way of reaching that goal?

    It’s amazing how often conspiracy theories are _internally_ nonsense.  We need a word for that, a way to distinguish  conspiracy theories that are internally   nonsense from ones that are probably wrong, but at least have some sort of internal rhyme and reason to them. Because at this point, we have some many just _completely idiotic_ conspiracy theories that we need a way to point out ‘I’m not disputing your conspiracy based on the actual facts, I’m disputing it based on the fact the theory _itself_ makes no sense.’.

    You want to come up to me and asserting the mob assassinated JFK, well, okay, you have no evidence of that, but at least it’s a _logical_ theory, and it’s really hard to disprove. So I might think you’re wrong, but I don’t think you’re crazy.

    You want to tell me that someone rigged the presidential election in Maine via busing in black people, that’s…uh…I don’t even have to check the facts of that, because it’s a completely idiotic plan that only someone completely out of touch with reality would believe.

  • DavidCheatham

    Actually, thinking about it, there are three classes of conspiracy theories:

    1) Ones that make sense, and cannot be disproved because they’re basically just about people. (Lee Harvey Oswald was working for someone, ‘let it happen on purpose’ truthers, etc.)

    2) Ones that technically would make sense, but the actual evidence tends to indicate they are wrong. (JFK assassination theories asserting the gun shots came from elsewhere, faked moon landing theories, etc.)

    3) Ones that do not make any logical sense at all. (The Pentagon attack was done by a missile, people attempted to rig the Maine presidential election, President Obama instructed people to lie about Benghazi for certain amount of time and then tell the truth, the pollster are biased toward Obama, there is in-person voter impersonation.)

    It might be noteworthy that a lot of my example of type 3 are _very recent_ Republican conspiracies, and I had to, in fact, think hard to come up with a ‘left’ conspiracy. (Although, of course, even believing the #1 version of trutherism is enough to get you kicked out of the left.)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Charity-Brighton/100002974813787 Charity Brighton

    Yeah, I get the idea of parents trying to convert/brainwash their kids into voting like they do, but that involves actually changing their opinions to match the parents’. I can’t imagine someone saying, “I am personally a leftist/liberal, but I only vote for conservative Republicans because my great grandmother did, my grandmother did, my mother did, and now I do. I don’t agree with their positions but that’s just how my family operates.”

  • MaryKaye

    It might make sense if you came from somewhere where the political parties were very active presences in your life.  I could see this kind of loyalty in a union situation:  “I don’t agree with the union’s current politics, but they bailed my dad out when his shop folded, and got a doctor for my grandpa when the boiler exploded, and I can’t turn my back on them now.”

    My mother felt that way about the Catholic Church.  I don’t personally know anyone who feels that way about Democrats or Republicans but I can imagine it happening.

  • Lori

     I can imagine someone saying “I am personally a leftist/liberal, but I tell my family that I vote for conservative
    Republicans because my great grandmother did, my grandmother did, my
    mother did, and now I do. I don’t agree with their positions but that’s
    just how my family operates.” But yeah, I can’t imagine actually voting against my own beliefs in order to conform with family voting patterns, especially when the reason for the ancestral votes very likely no longer exists. That’s part of the reason we have the secret ballot. Everyone is entitled to vote his/her own beliefs in the privacy of the voting booth. 

  • Lori

     

    Man, if you haven’t heard liberals complain of conservative bias in the
    news, you haven’t heard anyone talk about Occupy Wall Street. The
    radical sorts never shut up about how the mass media conspiracy has
    poisoned the minds of the public against the truth and righteousness of
    their specific brand of Marxism.   

    Are you saying that you think OWS is Marxist? Because if so, that would seem to indicate that there’s a problem of some sort with the coverage of OWS.

  • Tricksterson

    Couple of examples of what you’re looking for:  David Frum and the blog Chasing Glenn Beck

  • Tricksterson

    I think he’s using a very broad definition of “Marxism” as in “all socialism is a branch of Marxism” whereas the opposite is true, Marxism is only one branch of socialism.

  • AnonymousSam
  • P J Evans

    Is there any sort of defeat they can’t rationalize away? Is anything going to force them to face reality, or are we doomed to two more decades of a completely nonfunctional political system?

    They’ll rationalize everything as a failure to be conservative enough, and as long as they think like that, they’ll be trying to keep government from functioning, just like they’ve done for most of the last four years.

  • Albanaeon

     Yeah, those radical OWSers.  Nothing like pointing out that the current system is crap and that its pretty much big finance’s fault to really be out-there-out-of-touch radicals…

    And of course that would be the radical agenda’s fault that the media wasn’t sympathetic and not that the media is backed by the big corporate profits that OWS is protesting.

    You wonder what is going to bring back fact-based conservatism?  Start by not demonizing legitimate opposition to the current FUBAR.  Keep eliminating the brakes and of course we’ll keep going over the edge.

  • http://dpolicar.livejournal.com/ Dave

     My mom voted Democrat for most of her working life this way… her sensibilities are more aligned with Republicans, but she felt she owed the Democrats her allegiance for stuff they’d done for her family when they first arrived in the US. Once she retired and moved to Florida, she became more consistently Republican.

    I finally had the conversation with her this morning where I said “oh, and incidentally, the fact that you voted for the guy who wants to repeal the ACA and wants my marriage to be against the law is something that hurts my feelings on a personal level,” which I wasn’t sure I’d ever actually say to her.

  • Madhabmatics

     No man, don’t you see? The Marxist focus on the means of production was just a cover for their real agenda – watered down banking reforms. Truly, the spectre of communism hangs over us all.

  • Madhabmatics

    If you don’t remember the famous chapters of Das Kapital, RACE MIXING and LOW FAT FOODS FOR CHILDREN ONLY, it’s easy to think that these dastardly hippies might not be part of the Red Menace.

  • Rowen

     Thank you for this. I’ve been down to OWS a few times, and have worked with people involved there, and the news coverage trended towards 1) Dirty hippies have (sometimes non consensual) sex and throwing trash everywhere, 2) no one having a clue as to why they’re down there (“OWS has no goals!” “Here’s a manifesto…” “OWS has no goals!!” 3) something something private property something something. . .

  • Lliira

    WTF?

    Out of respect for your father, you’re of the party that likes to throw U.S. soldiers’ lives away on unwinnable wars. Out of respect for your father, you’re of the party that doesn’t think women — you — are completely human. Out of respect for your father, you’re going against your conscience. How can you respect a parent by going against your conscience? Didn’t your parents raise you to follow your conscience, to make your own decisions, to do the right thing? Did they raise you to be an unthinking authoritarian, sticking your face under the boot? I cannot believe any parent would want that for their child.

    I can’t wrap my head around this. My grandfather was a World War II veteran. A paratrooper in the Pacific Theatre. He saw hell for this country, he made hell for this country. This country broke his heart when they used nuclear weapons against civilians, but he still thought he could serve it, maybe change it for the better, so he joined the CIA. He knew this country — knew stuff he was never allowed to tell. He carried physical and psychological pain with him his whole life for this country. Working for this country made him a leftist.

    Supporting authoritarian, racist, misogynist ignoramuses who wank to war movies but know nothing about what war actually is, is the most disrespectful thing I can think of toward any veteran. Going against my conscience is the most disrespectful thing I can think of toward my grandparents and parents. Grow up and own your choices, stop blaming your father for them.


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