Chick-fil-A Biblical Family of the Day

Chick-fil-A president Dan Cathy: “We support biblical families.”

Today’s Chick-fil-A Biblical Family of the Day: David & etc. (2 Samuel 5:12-16).

David then perceived that the Lord had established him king over Israel, and that he had exalted his kingdom for the sake of his people Israel.

In Jerusalem, after he came from Hebron, David took more concubines and wives; and more sons and daughters were born to David. These are the names of those who were born to him in Jerusalem: Shammua, Shobab, Nathan, Solomon, Ibhar, Elishua, Nepheg, Japhia, Elishama, Eliada, and Eliphelet.

  • Foreigner

    ” … Solomon’s the clever one, and Eliphelet is the one with the kind of long nose.”

  • Carstonio

    I expect that Fred will follow this up with I Kings 11:1-7. Assuming the accounts of both father and son are true, both would likely have kept all their wives and concubines in massive harems, and they probably had many more children than are listed. Is there any reason to treat these accounts as simply macho boasting by their descendants?

  • christopher_y

    Is there any reason to treat these accounts as simply macho boasting by their descendants?

    Could well be macho boasting, but in the harem of the Osmanli Sultans the most favoured and powerful women had their own retinues of slaves that could run into hundreds (and some of them probably had slaves of their own), and these women were theoretically available to the Sultan too, although many of them probably never clapped eyes on him in their lives. So the total female population of a royal harem could be enormous if you counted everybody. Which you would if you were trying to brag up your granddad’s power.

  • MikeJ

    Shammua, Shobab

    Hasenpfeffer Incorporated!

  • Amaryllis

    The Chick-fil-A Poem of the Day, for King David, who was prolific with both children and poems:

     
    If you are terrified of your own death,
    and want to escape from it,
    you may want to write a poem,
    for the poem might carry your name
    into eternity, the poem
    may become immortal, beyond flesh
    and fashion, it may be read
    in a thousand years by someone
    as frightened of death as you are,
    in a dark field, at night,
    when he has failed once again at love
    and there is no illusion with which to escape
    the inward pull of his own flesh
    against the narrowing margins of the spirit.

    But if you have accepted your own death,
    if you have pinched daily the corroborating flesh,
    and have passed the infinite gravestones
    bearing your name, if you know for certain
    that the day will one day come
    when you will gaze into the mirror in search of your face
    and find only a silence, then
    you may want to make a child, you may want to push
    the small oracles of flesh forward
    into some merely finite but lengthening story,
    you may want to toss your seed into the wind
    like a marigold, or a passion fruit, and watch
    as a fresh flower grows in your place, as your face
    inches onto another face, and your eyes
    slip down over your cheeks onto the forehead
    of your silenced, speakable future.

    And, then, when you are done with all that,
    you may want to write a poem.- Michael Blumenthal


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