Smart people saying smart things

Abby Norman: “Why I Stopped Telling”

I stopped telling the stories of my most resilient kids, because I realized that people were getting the impression that because some of the kids were rising above their circumstances, it was okay to blame the rest for not being able to do the same.

I stopped telling the stories of my church donating cases of paper to my school, because I don’t want anyone to get the impression that it is ever okay for a school in America to run out of paper in October. The church should absolutely meet the needs of the poor, but the church shouldn’t have to supply copy paper for an entire school because the system is broken.

I stopped telling the stories of my most brilliant teaching, my most inspired ideas, because I did not want someone to get the impression that if I was just brilliant and inspired all of the time, I could save my kids.

Equally Blessed: “Prayers for Benedict, Hopes for His Successor”

We pray for a pope who is willing to listen to and learn from all of God’s people. We pray for a pope who will realize that in promoting discrimination against LGBT people, the church inflicts pain on marginalized people, alienates the faithful and lends moral credibility to reactionary political movements across the globe. We pray for a pope who will lead the church in looking the sexual abuse scandal squarely in the eye and make a full report on the complicity of the hierarchy in the sexual trauma inflicted on children around the world. We pray for a pope who is willing to make himself vulnerable on behalf of the voiceless, the poor, the marginalized and the oppressed.

Garry Wills: “New Pope? I’ve Given Up Hope”

Jesus, we are reminded, said to Peter, “You are Peter, and upon this rock I will build my church.” But Peter was addressed as a faithful disciple, not as a priest or a pope. There were no priests in Peter’s time, and no popes. Paul never called himself or any of his co-workers priests. He did not offer sacrifice. Those ideas came in later, through weird arguments contained in the anonymous Epistle to the Hebrews. The claim of priests and popes to be the sole conduits of grace is a remnant of the era of papal monarchy. We are watching that era fade. But some refuse to recognize its senescence. Such people will run peppily up, like Charlie Brown, to the coming of a new pope. But Lucy, as usual, still holds the football.

Paul Krugman: “Raise That Wage”

It’s important to understand how the minimum wage interacts with other policies aimed at helping lower-paid workers, in particular the earned-income tax credit. … The tax credit … is also good policy. But it has a well-known defect: Some of its benefits end up flowing not to workers but to employers, in the form of lower wages. And guess what? An increase in the minimum wage helps correct this defect. It turns out that the tax credit and the minimum wage aren’t competing policies, they’re complementary policies that work best in tandem.

Brenna Clarke Gray: “Stop Apologizing for What You Like to Read”

You should not apologize for what you like to read. The person you are apologizing to can only fit into one of three categories:

1. He or she shares your joy.

2. He or she doesn’t give a good goddamn.

3. He or she thinks less of you for what you read in which case don’t apologize to that person because he or she is clearly a douchebag who doesn’t deserve your obeisance.

  • P J Evans

    Apparently at some point, Congress passed a resolution

    Actually, as I understand it,  it was before McCain was running – there were a lot of people born in the Canal Zone in the 30s, and Congress wanted to make sure it was clear they were citizens.
    (I ran into a case last week where a woman was naturalized at 65: she’d been born in Canada to parents who were US citizens, and the family returned to the US before she was 8 years old.)

  • banancat

     As a wise philosopher once said, “Love is like a brick – you can build a house, or sink a dead body.”

    I like to quote things like that and not make a point of who said them, just to see how long it takes for people to realize.

  • Kirala

    I like to quote things like that and not make a point of who said them, just to see how long it takes for people to realize.

    Does it count if I Googled immediately to find out the source, because I was impatient to realize? (Not that I could have ever come up with that particular source on my own… there are days I feel my ignorance badly.)
    I like to
    quote things like that and not make a point of who said them, just to
    see how long it takes for people to realize. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    I like to
    quote things like that and not make a point of who said them, just to
    see how long it takes for people to realize. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    I like to
    quote things like that and not make a point of who said them, just to
    see how long it takes for people to realize. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread

  • Kirala

     Crap. Disqus really hates copy/pasting today, apparently.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I think they don’t grasp how their actions still look like hypocrisy. They should’ve been demanding McCain’s birth certificate, and just for completeness, Biden’s, too.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Incidentally, since we’re on criticism of Obama – you know how all those right-wingers are fulminating about the liberal media ad nauseam?

    Proof: The press was far more fawning over Dubya Bush.

  • Kubricks_Rube

    I guess we disagree about Tyler’s role in the story. You’re comparing him here to the heroes (even if they are antiheroes) of other movies, but I don’t view him as the hero of Fight Club but the antagonist. He’s the houseguest that won’t leave, the seemingly great idea that ends up backfiring, the Frankenstein’s monster that can’t be controlled- and that, in my opinion, is how the movie presents him. He serves the same basic function as Tom Cruise in Collateral (a movie with a lot of similarities to Fight Club and another favorite of mine).

    I think the film asks us to answer your ethical question by judging Project Mayhem as both inadequate and hypocritical. These people aren’t against capitalism because it is exploitative or evil; they are not fighting for the poor or marginalized; they oppose capitalism because they have allowed it to make them passive and depressed with their lives. Fight Club serves a useful and important purpose in providing them an outlet and method for taking back their identity and individuality. Project Mayhem, on the other hand, is their sense of entitlement (hinted at in all their lamentations about their generation and their fathers and the undercurrent of misogyny running through their “castration” anxieties) given an outlet by their newfound confidence. Against the narrator’s will and to his horror, they decide that choosing another path is not good enough; giving people another option is not sufficient; instead, society must be coerced and the system that they let themselves be deadened by must fall. They abdicate personal responsibility and with it the personal identity they worked so hard to recapture (as the Narrator tries to show them in the “His name was Robert Paulson” scene).

    For related thoughts, here’s a Fight Club essay I like from Jim Emerson:

    http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/19991025/EDITOR/40828001/1023

  • vsm

    I think the interesting thing about Fight Club is that it’s a film about a violent fascist cult leader and terrorist that we sort of end up rooting for. I think your reading of the film as a wish-fulfilment fantasy is correct, but isn’t it interesting they chose this particular character as our fulfiller? You don’t need to be a fascist longing for the days of proper masculinity to blow up credit card companies; If it was only about that, they could have just as well used a leftist anarchist as Jack’s alter ego, or rewritten the script until it was about a socialist revolution.

     I didn’t mean to imply action films don’t deserve analysis, especially if we include westerns. Rather, I don’t think contextualizing them in the real world is nearly as interesting as with Fight Club, because its ideas are so far from the mainstream. Saying John Wayne’s default character would likely be a Republican in the real world is hardly shocking information, but placing Tyler Durden in the context of fascist ideology and domestic terrorism can be a bit more revealing.
    it’s a ilm about an evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist
    paramilitary cult which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation
    and blows up high-rises”.  – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    about an
    evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist paramilitary cult
    which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation and blows up
    high-rises”. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/comment-page-1/#comment-377544
    about an
    evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist paramilitary cult
    which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation and blows up
    high-rises”. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/comment-page-1/#comment-377544
    about an
    evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist paramilitary cult
    which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation and blows up
    high-rises”.  – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/comment-page-1/#comment-377544
    about an
    evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist paramilitary cult
    which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation and blows up
    high-rises”.  – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/comment-page-1/#comment-377544
    about an
    evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist paramilitary cult
    which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation and blows up
    high-rises”. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/comment-page-1/#comment-377544
    about an
    evil, mentally disturbed man who runs a violent facist paramilitary cult
    which eventually turns into a terrorist organisation and blows up
    high-rises”. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/comment-page-1/#comment-377544

  • vsm

    Disqus hates us all today, it seems. Please ignore everything after the word “revealing”.

  • Lee B.

     Disqus hates everyone, always and forever.  It’s just having trouble hiding it today.

  • Kubricks_Rube

    Despite having a different take on certain elements of the film, I do think your reading is fair, and that ambiguity is one of the reasons I think that Fight Club lends itself to analysis more than the average film of any genre, not just the average action film.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

     

    That is so sad. A teacher who has no understanding of their own subject
    area turned loose on kids and driving them away from that subject area
    through their own ignorance. What on earth did they teach that person in
    college?

    Apparently that the point of literature was “the use of language,” not telling a story or making your audience feel something or think about something. And of course, that a work’s literary value can be determined by whether it is “genre fiction” or “literary fiction” (a distinction which requires a very, very bizarre idea of “genre”).

  • LoneWolf343

     I have to give you that one.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

    So: judging other people for their reading material is *generally* a
    dick move, but I absolutely reserve the right to avoid anyone who says
    that his favorite book is The Fountainhead.

     “There are two novels that can change a
    bookish fourteen-year old’s life: The Lord of the Rings and Atlas
    Shrugged
    . One is a childish fantasy that often engenders a lifelong
    obsession with its unbelievable heroes, leading to an emotionally
    stunted, socially crippled adulthood, unable to deal with the real
    world. The other, of course, involves orcs.” ― John Rogers

  • hidden_urchin

    I don’t get it.  How did your teacher think the use of language was independent from storytelling or making the audience feel or think? 

    Also, I’ve run into the literary/genre fiction distinction before and I find it equally perplexing.  Maybe it’s just because I choose my words and syntax very carefully to reinforce my story and give it extra layers of meaning, even if I’m only writing a horror story, but  I’m suspicious the distinction is really more about classism than anything else.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

    I confess: I actually kind of enjoyed Twilight.  It’s like cotton candy: fluffy, no nutritional value, no subtlety of taste, and melts instantly in your mouth.  But sometimes that’s the sort of thing I’m in the mood for.  By no means would I claim it’s a good book, but it entertained me.

    The rest of the series pretty  much plunged downhill from there (and it was never a very high hill to begin with), but I read it anyway because I wanted to know what everyone was talking about.

    But of course I’m in my 30′s and know perfectly well that in real life men who act like Edward and Jacob (especially Edward) are not good men to be involved with, and that as important as good spousehood and parenthood is, in real life it’s desirable for women to have other interests besides being a wife and mother.  For the target audience group I think the series is potentially more problematic.   (At least. I’m pretty sure Edward was meant to be appealing to the target audience, despite being a boring character.)

    *****************

    At any rate, if someone has the mental energy to always consume material that is deep and though-provoking in their spare time instead of material that’s just entertaining, go them.  I’m not one of them, though. :-)

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    My presence on Slacktivist has been sporadic of late, so it probably wasn’t me.  But thank you anyway.  :)

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    Maybe if
    you read a little bit less of that stuff, you’d be able to articulate
    yourself in a way that is actually persuasive, or worth listening to, or
    at least well-composed

    Dear gods, your first paragraph that quote is from is all one sentence. I really hope this is a poe. Or that you’re high. Preferably both.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    Even bad pop culture can have good things come out of it.  io9 had an article recently called “9 Reasons to be Grateful for Twilight” — one reason listed is that it sparked a conversation on what kind of messages teenage girls are getting.

    http://io9.com/5960015/9-reasons-to-be-grateful-for-twilight

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    I hate Twilight a lot. But I have nothing against people who like it. There’s a story buried down deep in the book that’s rather compelling. 

    A ton of the Twilight hate is pure sexism. Oh, those stupid girls are so stupid; girls shouldn’t get turned on by descriptions of hot guys, ew, they might think they’re allowed to have sexual fantasies; girls are completely unable to tell fantasy from reality. There’s an underlying idea that teenage girls must be protected from themselves at all costs — and the best way to do that, of course, is to take their masturbation material away from them. 

    Every girl I knew read V.C. Andrews books when we were 12-14. None of us started thinking being raped by, and then marrying, our brothers would be peachy keen. 

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    So I’m not the only one who uses the V.C. Andrews comparison!

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    I see people use it all the time :). And it’s hardly only her — ever since girls started reading lots of novels centuries ago, people have been rending their garments and gnashing their teeth over how horrible said novels supposedly were for girls to be reading. They wanted girls to read sermons every night before they went to bed, not novels in which young women were placed in dangerous situations with sexy, likely dangerous men.

  • Daughter

     Oh yeah, I read VC Andrews, too!

    I have heard some refer to Catherine Morland, the gothic romance novel-loving heroine of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey as a “proto-Twihard.” So yes, this criticism of young girls’ reading habits is a centuries-old trend.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I guess a related criticism could be that authors feel it is a normal thing to present stalkerish behavior (like Edward hanging out in Bella’s bedroom without so much as a by-your-leave) in fiction rather than showing that it is actually A Problem.

    That ties into how Western culture has presented male-female interactions generally, with persistence in a man “winning over” the reluctant woman, and off the happy couple go into the sunset.

    In that respect one could say that Meyer’s writing is more descriptive than prescriptive.

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    I’ve always been fond of the Calvin & Hobbes/Fight Club theory: http://ignatz.brinkster.net/cfightclub.html

  • Hexep

    Mine is a wide-spectrum misanthropy, which is unbound by sex, gender, orientation, creed, color, or nation.

    But I’ll just say this and be done-

    I am a smoker. Company policy forbids me to smoke at my desk, so in-between reading this and composing this, I went to grab a cigarette and think over what I wanted to say. Having gone through four theoretical frameworks and trying my best to articulate my thoughts, I ultimately came up empty. I had something about my unwillingness to let an artist fool me into liking their work more than they did, or something, but it was all hogwash.

    So – I got nothing. Whether this is due to poor ideas or poor diction, I cannot say, but I cannot mount a meaningful counter-argument or defense of the position that I had previously taken. My wits have failed me, and all that remains is to acknowledge that.

    So, I concede the field. You are right, and I am wrong. I retire from this argument in defeat, wishing myself better luck next time, and acknowledge the victory of those who disagreed with me.

  • http://www.facebook.com/susan.paxton.94 Susan Paxton

    You should have said that. We need to not tolerate this, even from our own.

  • Fusina

     I have, on other occasions. I’m pretty sure she knows by now how I feel, so there is a possibility that bringing it up, yet again, was just a ploy to get me to go off. I am trying to quit doing pointless activities, so didn’t. But it did get me down, so I whinged a bit here. Y’all are, regardless of religious persuasion, very liberal in the monetary sense, so I can blow off some steam here and get sympathy. She will not, I don’t think, change, and doesn’t see the hypocrisy in using medicare while being against a single payer health care system–she complains about how expensive medicare is but I doubt she has any idea how expensive everything has gotten. This reminded me of when, mid eighties, I was attempting to find an apartment I could afford. The cheapest one bedroom apartments were something like 550/month. I was making minimum wage, which was $5/hour. I couldn’t afford rent, and food, and telephone, and electric, and insurance, and gasoline to get to my job, and she couldn’t understand why I didn’t find a cheaper apartment. My parents were still paying on their mortgage at the time, and their payment had ballooned up to $200/month what with all the taxes etc… that were included. She is clueless, and probably will remain so.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

     “A ton of the Twilight hate is pure sexism. Oh, those stupid girls are so stupid; girls shouldn’t get turned on by descriptions of hot guys, ew, they might think they’re allowed to have sexual fantasies; girls are completely unable to tell fantasy from reality.  There’s an underlying idea that teenage girls must be protected from themselves at all costs — and the best way to do that, of course, is to take their masturbation material away from them.”

    Really?  Because that’s not the Twilight hate I’ve seen at all. 

    I agree with Invisible Neutrino — the problem is that stalking and behaviors that IRL are warning signs of a potential abuser are being portrayed as the way to tell that a man is truly, deeply in love with you.  And I’d like to think that everyone knows that’s just a fantasy and not true IRL — men and women both — but I think the statistics on abusive relations tend not to bear that out.

    Likewise, I’d like to think that everyone knows that in real life, wifehood and motherhood isn’t necessarily the ONLY thing that women should aspire to in life, and that having a baby can be wonderful but isn’t necessarily the be-all and end-all of every woman’s life.  (This is also a recurring theme of the books.)  But again, I don’t think that’s necessarily the case.

    I’ve never read VC Andrews, but I think that “Men just try to control you because they love you and want to protect you,”  “Following a woman around is a sign that a man is in love,” and “Hey, why would a woman go to college when she could get married and be a mother?” are memes that are still floating around society in a way that “Women should want to get raped by their brothers and then marry them!” isn’t.

    Also the fact that it’s badly written and all the characters are boring as all get-out, of course.  Actually, that’s the biggest Twilight hate I’ve seen, the others have just been sidelights.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    Really? Because that’s not the Twilight hate I’ve seen at all.

    Lucky! I have multiple times seen people talk about wanting to beat Bella bloody… for being in an abusive relationship. I’ve seen people call Stephenie Meyer all sorts of misogynist names. I’ve seen people call Stephenie Meyer sick and twisted for being a “middle-aged woman” who wrote down her sexual fantasies. I’ve seen 14-year girls old bully other 14-year old girls online for being so “stupid” as to like the series. I have seen a few links to adults who think Edward and Bella have the perfect relationship, but you can always find people who are incredibly weird about anything on the internet. 

    The main reason I started reading and dissecting Twilight myself is that I didn’t see one single instance of anyone dissecting Twilight who did not use misogynist tropes to do so at least sometimes — except Ana Mardoll, iirc. And Ana’s great, but we come to things with very different worldviews. (Though she is the only other person I’ve seen criticize it who realizes what a scumbag Charlie is from the time he’s first introduced, rather than criticizing Bella for not worshiping her supposedly perfect daddy.) Also I had to see for myself. I didn’t realize it would be as badly written as it is, or that Bella and particularly Edward were as hateful as they are.

  • Carstonio

    I never knew that V.C. Andrews had a strong readership among middle-schoolers. All the readers I’ve met have been adult women.

    Since becoming the father of daughters, I find myself analyzing books for
    them from a feminist perspective. American Girl author Valerie Tripp
    said there weren’t enough girl-empowering books when she was that age.
    Too many stories where the boy explored the cave and the girl warned him not to go in there. (Insert your own Freudian symbolism joke here.)

    I agree that it’s silly to imagine girl readers of Andrews marrying their
    brothers. But if the books used sexist assumptions to define their
    female characters (and I don’t know if they do), I think that’s a
    justifiable concern as a parent, only because of the staggering
    pervasiveness of such assumptions in the larger culture. We’ve
    discouraged our kids from watching many reality shows because of the
    attitudes toward women. Instead of directly forbidding these, we stress
    the ugliness of those attitudes.

  • http://lliira.dreamwidth.org/ Lliira

    The books used sexist assumptions to define all their characters. And we knew it. They were soapy sexy over-the-top drama. Also, sex. 

    We knew what the books were. But they were Gothic romances with massive emphasis on sex, but without lots of explicit sex scenes, and those have always, and I think will always, pull young teenage girls in. The stuff we were “supposed” to read didn’t drip of sex danger sex danger sex danger sex. I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path.

    Also, until people start flipping out at popular comic books, movies, or anything else for their horrible, sexist portrayals of everyone as much as they flip out at Twilight, I will keep saying: it’s a double standard based on the idea that girls need to be protected from their own sexuality. Also, the idea that girls need to be the ones doing everything about sexism and abusive relationships, but boys get to keep having their fantasies and not working on these things at all.

  • Carstonio

    Damned right about the sexism in the books targeted at boys. Comics have gotten worse about this in the last few years, with the female heroes reduced to eye candy even further than before. Really infuriating when the apologists for this insist that critics are shaming female sexuality. A few times I’ve reread books from my childhood and realized how patronizing these were toward their female characters – back then it was probably like a fish not noticing that its environment is water.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Patrick-McGraw/100001988854074 Patrick McGraw

    How did your teacher think the use of language was independent from storytelling or making the audience feel or think?

    Apparently because storytelling didn’t matter, and making the audience feel or think only mattered if it was done through “the use of language,” rather than through engaging ideas or characters.

    I’m suspicious the [literary'genre] distinction is really more about classism than anything else.

    I think so too. The definitions of “literary fiction” that I’ve seen all essentially describe a set of audience expectations, and that’s what a genre is. These expectations usually happen to require protagonists who are well-off white people.

    There’s also the times where a work that is clearly part of another genre like science fiction, but is classed as “literary fiction” because it is written by an established “literary” author. I find this especially funny because when a “literary” author ventures into “genre fiction,” they usually do so without studying the genre and the result is terrible. But the litcrits fawn all over the author’s “bold exploration” of ideas and themes that have been addressed beautifully for decades by the “genre fiction” that they refused to read.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_2CUJHSQSQYTYT4DPZSKTVESYNQ B

    The stuff
    we were “supposed” to read didn’t drip of sex danger sex danger sex
    danger sex. I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and
    danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but
    ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
     “I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path.”

    In that it has a lot of sexism, a little bit of danger, and almost no sex? 

    Maybe one of us was reading the wrong books as a preteen, but the ones I remember reading had a lot less sexism and a lot more sex. :-)
    The stuff
    we were “supposed” to read didn’t drip of sex danger sex danger sex
    danger sex. I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and
    danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but
    ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    The stuff
    we were “supposed” to read didn’t drip of sex danger sex danger sex
    danger sex. I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and
    danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but
    ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    The stuff
    we were “supposed” to read didn’t drip of sex danger sex danger sex
    danger sex. I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and
    danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but
    ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    The stuff
    we were “supposed” to read didn’t drip of sex danger sex danger sex
    danger sex. I think we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and
    danger without having the sexism, in novels though not much else — but
    ironically, I think Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    I think
    we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and danger without having
    the sexism, in novels though not much else — but ironically, I think
    Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    I think
    we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and danger without having
    the sexism, in novels though not much else — but ironically, I think
    Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread
    I think
    we’re heading towards stuff that has the sex and danger without having
    the sexism, in novels though not much else — but ironically, I think
    Twilight is one step on that path. – See more at:
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/slacktivist/2013/02/25/smart-people-saying-smart-things-87/#disqus_thread

  • vsm

    I think film culture is a lot healthier in this regard. Sure, there are dumbasses who think only Bergman or Bresson are worth their time, but the classic cinephile follows in Godard and Truffaut’s footsteps and adores all of cinema, as long as it’s made well.


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