A delusional fantasy … on fire!

I’ve sometimes characterized much of the “Teavangelical” right-wing of America as people caught up in a delusional fantasy — and elaborate make-believe role-playing game in which they pretend to be heroic champions battling against Satanic baby-killers, Satanazis, and other imaginary monsters.

They speak and behave, I’ve argued, as though they prefer the world to be much, much worse than it is. They are privileged, but they enjoy pretending they are persecuted. Their neighbors may be very nice people, but they prefer pretending that those people are subhuman monsters out to destroy their freedom, their faith, and their country – bloodthirsty traitors to all that is good or sacred.

Some have suggested I’m exaggerating, and that they don’t really view themselves or the world in this way.

But I’m not the one who made this video.

YouTube Preview Image

This was made by and for the conservative folks attending CPAC. It is their own portrayal of themselves and of the world around them. This isn’t me describing them in such ridiculous terms. This is them describing themselves.

  • P J Evans

    Econ textbooks seem to assume perfection in everything. This may be why economic theories fail so often.

  • P J Evans

    Yes, there are people in the Tea Party who consider Fox to be liberal (or at least too liberal for them).

  • P J Evans

    Better to establish a colony on Mars and send ‘these people’. (Fewer of them to send.)

  • AnonaMiss

    You strongly implied that you are against truth in advertising laws. From upthread:

    So you’d rather live without the horror of regulation than admit that regulation makes nearer-perfect knowledge and therefore nearer-free markets possible?

    “better-working”, sometimes. “nearer-free”, no.

    While technically you chose not to answer the accusation-question, the quibble was not with the premise of the question (your personal opinions), but rather with the way it was asked – implying agreement with the substance of the accusation-question.

    (Note that this only implies agreement in an environment, like a comment thread, in which one isn’t pressed for time/can reread questions/can address the parts of a question independently.)

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Ideals and reality are often very different things.

  • banancat

    We’ve already discussed this on other threads about helping, but your presumption to help might not be nearly as helpful as you think. If you do hold doors for people, make sure you that you hold it only until they can grab it and hold it open for themselves. Don’t make a grand gesture of holding open while they walk past you. Don’t hold it if they’re more than a few steps away, because they will feel obligated to rush to return your (unasked for) favor. Don’t do it if it will make everything more awkward and difficult to navigate, such as in the small area between two sets of doors. Don’t do it on an elevator. And for the love of god, if someone makes any indication to let go of it, then let go of the door and move on with your life.

    Also, you may think you are applying this nice gesture equally, but you are almost certainly unconsciously biased at least to a certain small extent. I would bet real American dollars that you in the iffy in-between cases you are slightly more likely to hold a door for a woman, and even slightly more likely to hold it for a conventionally feminine woman, even if you don’t consciously intend that.

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    Well, in 1996, it became obvious to me that the real world had turned into a cyberpunk-ish dystopia from a particularly ham-fisted work of fiction. Nothing that’s happened since has made me re-evaluate that observation.

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    It’S called social darwinism

    “Survival of the Fattest”?


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X