A delusional fantasy … on fire!

I’ve sometimes characterized much of the “Teavangelical” right-wing of America as people caught up in a delusional fantasy — and elaborate make-believe role-playing game in which they pretend to be heroic champions battling against Satanic baby-killers, Satanazis, and other imaginary monsters.

They speak and behave, I’ve argued, as though they prefer the world to be much, much worse than it is. They are privileged, but they enjoy pretending they are persecuted. Their neighbors may be very nice people, but they prefer pretending that those people are subhuman monsters out to destroy their freedom, their faith, and their country — bloodthirsty traitors to all that is good or sacred.

Some have suggested I’m exaggerating, and that they don’t really view themselves or the world in this way.

But I’m not the one who made this video.

YouTube Preview Image

This was made by and for the conservative folks attending CPAC. It is their own portrayal of themselves and of the world around them. This isn’t me describing them in such ridiculous terms. This is them describing themselves.

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  • P J Evans

    They’re sure the problem they have is their messaging, and not their message. They think they’re winning, because they can’t see what the rest of us see,

  • Lori

    I saw this the other day and had no idea what to say about it. It would be easy to talk about it as a movie trailer. (For example, it desperately needs the “In a world where…” voice-over guy because that woman’s voice is annoying,)

    As self-portrait/propaganda it’s much more difficult to respond with anything more coherent than hysterical laughter and/or lots and lots of swearing.

  • Random_Lurker

    That lack of that “In a world where…” is very revealing.

    I wonder what that “15 years ago” part in the beginning is referring to.

  • LoneWolf343

    That would be 1998. What happened in 1998?

  • http://kingdomofsharks.wordpress.com/ D Johnston

    It’s probably set in the future – like with most dystopias (good or bad), it’s a “Should things continue on their present trajectory” kind of thing.

  • LoneWolf343

    Perhaps, but I found this http://www.historyorb.com/events/date/1998 and was having a few laughs at what caused the horrible world of today.

    15 years, huh? I suppose they thought 2016 was too soon.

  • Fusina

    Google was launched. That’s what caused the dystopia!

    Err. sarcasm was in effect up there, in case anyone thought differently.

  • Matri

    What happened in 1998?

    Well, it was halfway through Clinton’s second term, and America was suffering through a prosperous economy and a satanic budget surplus.

  • Richard Hershberger

    You forgot the hellish “being at peace” part.

  • gocart mozart

    The blow job was invented

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    Well, in 1996, it became obvious to me that the real world had turned into a cyberpunk-ish dystopia from a particularly ham-fisted work of fiction. Nothing that’s happened since has made me re-evaluate that observation.

  • The_L1985

    Monica Lewinsky?

  • Cate

    I have to say, I kinda want to watch that movie. But then, I’m a big fan of dystopian fiction.

  • http://homeinbabylon.com/ Chuchundra

    Not much of a dystopia though, is it?

    I mean, the evil, tolitarian state is….giving…people…food?

  • Lori

    Don’t you see? They’ve taken away the freedom to starve. Or more precisely, the freedom to feel smug while watching other people starve. The horror!

  • VMink

    This is actually a lot more accurate than I wanted to believe. A facebook post I saw recently from a person I once mentored expressed joy at an article that called for the removal/ending of all welfare programs. It didn’t say what the people who couldn’t get jobs through no fault of their own should do, or what people should do until they could get their shitty 35-hours-a-week below-minimum-wage job. Naturally. That sort of thing never gets brought up, because, of COURSE they don’t want people to starve, but it’s up to Those People to take responsibility for themselves.

    Where the frell did I go wrong?

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    Heck, what about the people who can’t get a job through some fault of their own? Do they actually want those people to starve to death? I mean, let’s be clear here: what they’re calling for is capital punishment for the unemployable.

  • Richter_DL

    It’S called social darwinism

  • Brightwater

    …but they don’t believe in evolution!

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    It’S called social darwinism

    “Survival of the Fattest”?

  • VMink

    Gah, that’s a just-as-good point that I hadn’t even thought of. =P

  • http://kingdomofsharks.wordpress.com/ D Johnston

    They want you to pay taxes for government services!

    It’s not quite 1984, is what I’m saying.

  • http://profiles.google.com/marc.k.mielke Marc Mielke

    But you need to show an ID card. And its only one step from that to concentration camps and the mark of the beast.
    (I should totally start using ‘Marc of the Beast’ as my new pseudonym.)

  • Vermic

    Jeez, you’d think the Tea Party would be glad about the ID cards. At least then there’s some accountability. Could you imagine the horror of a world where people who need stuff just receive it, no questions asked, no papers to show? Even … illegal aliens???

  • banancat

    Cards for thee but not for me.

  • Magic_Cracker

    Too on the nose, but Marc de la Bête wouldn’t be bad.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I’m reminded of the movie of Atlas Shrugged, watching that “trailer” Fred linked to.

  • Lori

    I read that they’re going ahead with AS Part 3, even though hardly anyone went to see part 1 and even fewer bothered with part 2. I assume there will be more major recasting involved.

    Funny how folks who are such fans of the free market can’t seem to grasp that the market has spoken and it doesn’t want these movies.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    I know Part 1 bombed, which put the making of a Part 2 into doubt. In fact, I only discovered just this morning that Part 2 had been made when I saw it as an item in the inventory of a Redbox I browsed as I waited for the bus.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    “Bombed” almost doesn’t describe it. They spent $20M to make it and it made $4.6M in the box office. Part 2 had a budget of $10M and made $3.3M in the office, arguably making it more successful simply because it cost the producers less when it crashed and burned.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jon.maki Jon Maki

    Oddly enough, Part 1 was actually a better movie than Part 2.
    It wasn’t in any way a good movie, mind you, but it was better.
    It seems as though it was made with slightly more care and attention to craft, while Part 2 was focused entirely on driving home the message.

  • Barry_D

    Just compare the trailers. The trailer for part 1 was an action/intrigue/something happening movie; the trailer for part 2 was a black background with snippets of political speech on it.

  • Czanne

    Part 1 is actually very good if you mute and MST3K it to be a can-do film about public investment in infrastructure and technocrats in the service of the greater good.

    (You mean I wasn’t supposed to do that? And I’m not supposed to just like the pretty, pretty trains?)

  • Turcano
  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    I saw the list of names on that and the reviews and though, OK, they did voice work for a cartoon and didn’t realize how much it would suck. But no, it was live action.

    Best review line: “This is not as I wish, Farm Boy! This is not as I wish!”

  • fraser

    The producers say they saw 2 as a way to shift the political landscape right before the election,although that may have been them hyping themselves.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Shift what? A grain of sand?

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    The producers say they saw 2 as a way to shift the political landscape right before the election,although that may have been them hyping themselves.

    They may well have been.

    It would be the same reason Michael Moore made Fahrenheit 9/11. That did not work, and I do not know why they thought this one might have done any better.

  • histrogeek

    Dinesh D’Souza tried the same thing last year. His was not a flop like Atlas Shrugged (movie to be retitled Audience Shrugged), but had the same impact on the elections as Moore did in 2004.

  • Beroli
  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Waitwaitwait. Part 2 actually came out? Holy ripple on the ocean of movie releases, Batman!

  • banancat

    That was my thought too. I didn’t even know part 2 ever existed. Apparently it was such a bomb that the people who make a point of making fun of it didn’t even care enough to make fun of it.

  • Matri

    (For example, it desperately needs the “In a world where…” voice-over guy because that woman’s voice is annoying,)

    That’s Don LaFontaine. And he died in 2008…

  • http://rightcrafttool.blogspot.com/ Sign Ahead

    In a world without Don LaFontaine…we can still find “5 Guys in a Limo” on YouTube.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQRtuxdfQHw

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/ Geds

    Watching this it occurs to me that the Evangelical Christian and Tea Party types who are the targets of this sort of thing actually live in a sci-fi world. It also occurs to me that they’re terrible at writing speculative fiction (*cough* Left Behind *cough*). That’s really weird. Am I the only one who finds that particular juxtaposition weird?

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    I have a classmate who moved up to the Pacific northwest from Louisiana so she could learn to be a computer animator, something she found little opportunity to express and grow down there. She says that it was because her conservative Christian family, like many families she knew there, placed very little value on creativity and had not much imagination.

    I suspect she would agree with you on this point.

  • alfgifu

    Watching this it occurs to me that the Evangelical Christian and Tea Party types who are the targets of this sort of thing actually live in a sci-fi world. It also occurs to me that they’re terrible at writing speculative fiction (*cough* Left Behind *cough*). That’s really weird. Am I the only one who finds that particular juxtaposition weird?

    I think that makes sense, actually. Losing track of the difference between fantasy and reality doesn’t just make it difficult to cope with the real world, it also means that you lose the fantasy world as well. Both have to stay at a certain level of fuzziness or the illusion breaks down and takes the cognitive dissonance with it.

  • Morilore

    Its sad how ridiculously “meh” that dystopia is.

    OMG long lines and everything has this one symbol on it.

    OMG government leader guy gets angry sometimes.

    OMG they don’t let you not pay taxes.

    OMG those are some really awkward catchphrases dude.

    I mean jeez you could at least show them disappearing people or shutting off someone’s card for criticizing the wrong person or something.

  • http://kingdomofsharks.wordpress.com/ D Johnston

    Oh, so you’re saying that you don’t find people carrying boxes of food, talking on phones (government phones!) and watching TV news terrifying?

    For a second, I actually thought that this might be a legit trailed for an independent film, and thought that the whole thing might go further into the tyranny!!! aspect. But after poking around a bit, it looks like it’s just a promo for a Hunger Games-themed party they held at CPAC (seriously) and I don’t think the film exists beyond that. However, they are recutting it into a music video, so there’s that.

  • Lori

    Hunger Games-themed party they held at CPAC

    Can you imagine the epic lack of self-awareness that was on display at that little soiree? The mind reels.

  • Jessica_R

    Oh god, The Hunger Games? And like Lori said, it’s pretty amazing to realize they think they’re not Effie Trinket.

  • Ben English

    Well clearly, as Efie Trinket is part of the Big Government and they’re Conservatives ™ which means they want Small Government ™.

    Now, about that new Anti Sharia Law bill that Mrs.Bachmann brought up yesterday…

  • http://mordicai.livejournal.com Mordicai

    As in the Left Behind reviews…the Antichrist’s big plan is…to marginally raise taxes to…give food & aid to the starving! WHAT A MONSTER.

  • fraser

    Yes, there’s not the slightest indication that they need to go underground instead of fighting this thing at the ballot box.

  • Lorehead

    Sorry to come to the discussion late, but I think the problem is supposed to be that the Development Party is popular. Most of the people, as represented by the brown-skinned woman at 0:57, support it out of moral inferiority. The Liberty movement lost the debate, which makes Democracy illegitimate.

    The hero’s counterargument would logically imply that the Tea Party should support personal autonomy against all forms of economic coercion. The more we depend on anyone, whether government or corporation or a rich uncle, the more they control us, and they refuse to accept mere material wealth as adequate compensation. Of course, they have no intention of applying that standard to anyone but the DesignatedVillain.

  • http://reasondecrystallized.blogspot.com/ extremities

    Roll a Will Save and join the resistance!

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    I hate youtube’s automatic captioning system. ._.

    Is there a transcript of the audio anywhere?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Me too. Their subtitling system seriously needs work.

  • The_L1985

    I really wish that people were allowed to correct the subtitles.

  • AnonaMiss

    Seriously? You want YouTube’s user base correcting subtitles?

  • The_L1985

    I was thinking more along the lines of allowing the uploader to correct subtitles. I’m pretty sure they’re auto-generated right now, and if the uploader had control over the subtitles, they could actually make them correct.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Well, I know uploaders *can* create captions, but many obviously don’t or Youtube seems to substitute voice-recognition captions anyway.

  • P J Evans

    And those voice-recognition captions are nonsense at best.

  • Veylon

    I feel strangely nostalgic about this trailer. Remember all the way back when Bush was president and scary stuff like the Patriot act was coming down the pike? Where were these people then?

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Cheering. The Isatamuslim terrorists were being hunted down, not them. That’s completely changed, now that the arbitrary TSA scanning is taking place during the Satanic Muslim’s reign of unholy terror instead of the Good Ol’ Boy’s reign of righteous terror.

  • SisterCoyote

    That evil senator guy is almost as believable a villain as Nicolae Carpathia. Good grief.

  • SisterCoyote

    Sigh. Well, that’s one thing to be said about Disqus. At least it’s harder to break the thread HTML.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Michael-Albright/100001047690991 Michael Albright

    He’s more consistently menacing; Nicolae’s weird vacillation from genuine benevolence to villainous cackling makes this guy’s benevolence at the barrel of a gun stand out as something the writers actually thought about before committing it to film. Sure, he’s a caricature, but he’s only one caricature, as opposed to the any-one-of-several-caricatures personality poor Nicolae’s been saddled with.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Matt-Herrera/100000106872183 Matt Herrera

    I think Bender has the only proper response to that video:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FopyRHHlt3M

  • http://www.facebook.com/dan.k.hetrick Dan Hetrick

    I would laugh if these people weren’t so serious. I’m still trying to figure out what’s so bad about feeding people and paying for social services that we all enjoy.

  • Baby_Raptor

    They don’t get to choose who is “worthy” of eating and getting those services.

  • Jenny Islander

    That’s it in a nutshell. Only the people who pass the test are allowed to eat. And the test is mainly concerned with shutting out anybody whose circumstances expose the flaws in the current system–making them silent, invisible, gone. It’s the old “deserving poor” lie all over again.

  • Hexep

    But is there a real movie attached to it? I would LOVE to see that.

  • Nick

    Nice paraphrase of Marx, there. These people don’t even know what the word “socialist” means…

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Michael-Albright/100001047690991 Michael Albright

    Yes, they do. It means “I hate paying taxes.” Admittedly, that makes for awkward syntax, but when you’re frothing at the mouth, who has time for proper grammar?

  • http://www.facebook.com/WingedWyrm Charles Scott

    For all the talk of freedom, they’re not displaying the lack of freedom. What they’re displaying is the paying of taxes and the use of taxes in supporting certain needs.

    Now, I’m not saying that communism is good. Ideally, it wouldn’t be totalitarian, but there’s little other way to go about it. But, all they’re showing is “people are paying taxes and other people are getting stuff from the government!” And, they’re leaving it up to the viewers to assume “and, therefore, no freedom.”

    In fact, this is so absent any content and so chock full of style over substance that this is what I would expect to see in a movie theatre in Oceana.

  • http://profiles.google.com/marc.k.mielke Marc Mielke

    absent any content and so chock full of style

    That’s exactly it. They seem to think the big problem with Soviet-era food lines was the people standing in line, not the not having of the food.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Pretty much. It’s worth noting the Soviets put up with a lot as long as the government managed to keep them fed and housed.

  • Magic_Cracker

    I’ve known several people from the former Soviet Union and other Eastern Bloc counries. They grew up there in the 70s and 80s. They describe it as a society where “you could be free in your head” and where you could skip out on work for weeks at a time and the worst that would happen was a warning that you were being “antisocial.”

  • Isabel C.

    Yeah, I was gonna say: the difference between ZOMG TYRANNY and Friday morning at any Boston Starbucks appears to be that freedom requires you to pay for your latte.

  • Carstonio

    But, all they’re showing is “people are paying taxes and other people are getting stuff from the government!” And, they’re leaving it up to
    the viewers to assume “and, therefore, no freedom.”

    The narration mentions the giveaways promoting indolence, and that is what completes the dog whistle. This is a demographic that still largely believes the myth that civil rights was a communist plot. Some of the folks in the CPAC audience this month grumbled “Marxist!” when Martin Luther King was mentioned.

  • AnonaMiss

    Well. To be fair, a lot of the Civil Rights people were actually also communists. The Black Panther Party was for example explicitly a Communist party.

    This doesn’t make their opposition to civil rights any less abhorrent, but it does make them technically correct that some parts of the civil rights movement were communist.

  • Ben English

    At the same time it’s still a dog whistle in that our default image of Communism in action is the Soviet Union, which is certainly not the ideal held to by American communist parties.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Ideals and reality are often very different things.

  • Carstonio

    That’s true to an extent, but is missing the historical context. Starting more or less in the 1930s, the Communist Party in the US picked up folks who were interested in social justice or who had become disillusioned with the economic system at the time. Many in the former group didn’t believe in Marx that much but simply saw the party as the only ones doing anything on social justice issues. Probably very few in either group fit the stereotype of “being in league with Moscow” or seeking to overthrow the government. From what I’ve read of Richard Wright, too many of the real ideologues in the US Communist Party were exploiting the civil rights issue to attract the social justice crowd.

  • P J Evans

    I found that some of my relatives were registered to vote in the late 1940s as ‘Democratic Socialists’, or something like that. Not Communists, AFAICT, but leftist.

  • http://twitter.com/Jenk3 Jen K

    And the Dems co-opted some of the social justice platform, labeled it The New Deal, and pulled a bunch of folks over to them.

  • Carstonio

    FDR was often accused by the right of peddling socialism, but one of my college professors argued that the president was conservative in the traditional sense when it came to economics. He pointed out that the New Deal actually saved free enterprise (not the same thing as capitalism).

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Define those two terms. I define “free” in the context of “free markets” or “free enterprise” to be “absolutely free within the constraints of property rights” and have various definitions of capitalism for different occasions (just like I have different definitions of “freedom” for different occasions). I do not believe a free market/free enterprise system has ever existed.

  • EllieMurasaki

    ‘Free enterprise’ does not mean ‘without regulation’. Indeed, regulation is typically necessary to ensure that, to name one example, consumers have anything like enough information about the products in order to have a free choice between the products rather than a choice constrained by lack of information.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    I said “within the constraints of property rights”.

  • EllieMurasaki

    What do property rights have to do with consumers’ ability to know, in absence of regulation requiring nutrition facts labels, what’s in their food?

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Nothing. I do see fraud as a violation of property rights, though.

  • EllieMurasaki

    I’m not even talking about fraud. I’m talking about, the perfect knowledge necessary for a perfectly free market is impossible, but producers have a marked tendency to provide as little knowledge to consumers as they can get away with (it’s not fraud to refrain from saying ‘this medicine contains opium’, though it would be to say ‘this medicine does not contain opium’ about the same opium-containing medicine), and regulation is therefore necessary in order to have a more free market.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Who said a free market had to have perfect knowledge?

  • EllieMurasaki

    Uh, Economics 101 textbooks?

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    [citation needed].

  • EllieMurasaki

    “This equilibrating behavior of free markets requires certain assumptions about their agents, collectively known as Perfect Competition, which therefore cannot be results of the market that they create.” Wikipedia on ‘Free market’.

    “*Perfect information* – All consumers and producers are assumed to have perfect knowledge of price, utility, quality and production methods of products.” Wikipedia on ‘Perfect competition’, under ‘Basic structural characteristics’.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    As we live in the real, imperfect world, perfect competition just isn’t possible. http://mises.org/daily/1988

  • EllieMurasaki

    So you’d rather live without the horror of regulation than admit that regulation makes nearer-perfect knowledge and therefore nearer-free markets possible?

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    “better-working”, sometimes. “nearer-free”, no.

  • EllieMurasaki

    If a free market is by definition one that has perfect competition, and perfect competition by definition includes perfect knowledge, then how can measures to nearer approach perfect knowledge in the market do anything but make the market nearer approach free?

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    I never defined a free market as having perfect competition. Others may define it as such, but I am not one of them.

  • EllieMurasaki

    …you know, if you’re going to use words that don’t mean the same thing everyone else uses those words to mean, tell us up front, okay?

    What DO you mean by ‘free market’?

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    I thought I did tell you up front!

    I define “free” in the context of “free markets” or “free enterprise” to be “absolutely free within the constraints of property rights” and have various definitions of capitalism for different occasions (just like I have different definitions of “freedom” for different occasions).

    I define “market” the same way everyone else does.

  • EllieMurasaki

    Recursive: uses ‘free’ in both the term and its definition, leaving me to conclude that you mean ‘free’ in the same way Economics 101 does, a conclusion that you have said is false.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    You’re right on that one. I apologize.

  • AnonaMiss

    Here’s the thing though – the idea that the freer the market, the better? It relies on a model which assumes perfect competition. In which there’s no such thing as an oligopoly; if a monopoly slips up and makes a mistake, there’s a hungry startup ready and able to capitalize on it; and a starvation wage doesn’t stay a starvation wage for very long, as food prices adjust automatically to what people are able to pay for it.

    You don’t get to base your political/economic beliefs on a system which relies on perfect competition, and then use the fact that perfect competition is impossible to go “Oh well, guess we don’t need truth in advertising laws.”

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Where have I said that freedom in the market is directly correlated with social welfare? Competition doesn’t have to be perfect to be good. I never said that “we don’t need truth in advertising laws”.

  • AnonaMiss

    You strongly implied that you are against truth in advertising laws. From upthread:

    So you’d rather live without the horror of regulation than admit that regulation makes nearer-perfect knowledge and therefore nearer-free markets possible?

    “better-working”, sometimes. “nearer-free”, no.

    While technically you chose not to answer the accusation-question, the quibble was not with the premise of the question (your personal opinions), but rather with the way it was asked – implying agreement with the substance of the accusation-question.

    (Note that this only implies agreement in an environment, like a comment thread, in which one isn’t pressed for time/can reread questions/can address the parts of a question independently.)

  • P J Evans

    Econ textbooks seem to assume perfection in everything. This may be why economic theories fail so often.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Dude named Joseph Stiglitz wrote about Information asymmetry. You’ve probably heard of the guy. Won the Nobel Prize for Economics don’tchaknow.

  • dantesque17

    The QR code on the cards in the video is a real code. Try scanning it.
    I thought it would be something related to the Tea Party or CPAC, but it’s just a link to a business that sells promotional items.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Riastlin-Lovecraft/100000678992705 Riastlin Lovecraft

    That’s…actually kinda awesome. Hiding the link to your own website in your products, and just letting the end customer find it him/her/xer/itself. Completely undetectable for the uninterested. I find that admirable.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Michael-Albright/100001047690991 Michael Albright

    Curiously, I imagine CPAC would approve.

  • http://www.facebook.com/jon.maki Jon Maki

    What is this I don’t even.
    I’m reminded of this video made several years ago – for what purpose/event I’m not certain – featuring footage from the Star Wars movies that portrayed the GOP as being the Rebel Alliance fighting against the evil liberal Empire.
    It was especially nonsensical given that it was made Dubya’s second term, when the GOP also held a majority in the House and Senate.

  • fraser

    But that couldn’t possibly outweigh the iron-fisted tyranny of liberals who write blogs and actually question conservative positions!

  • Carstonio

    Most likely the video is all style and no substance because it’s meant to function as an extended dog whistle. The city on a hill introduction, the dictator’s pseudo-Marxist slogans, the vaguely Mark of the Beastish cards, the hints about taxes going to welfare for indolence, all were the creation of folks who know that more overt appeals to resentment would give away the game. I looked in vain for the other items on the Tea Party/RTC scorecard, such as allusions to feminism and homosexuality destroying families.

  • arcseconds

    i hate families that destroy homosexuality

  • http://profiles.google.com/marc.k.mielke Marc Mielke

    i hate families that destroy homosexuality

    BAN heterosexual marriage!

  • Carstonio

    Somewhat related. Maybe part of the denomination’s motive is to build up enough believers in New England to be able to reverse same-sex marriage there.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/20/southern-baptists-expand-north_n_2916374.html?ref=topbar

  • stardreamer42

    “Many New Englanders have zero familiarity with the Bible”

    … he’s kidding, right? Please tell me he’s kidding.

  • The_L1985

    “The more they give us, the more they control us!!”

    Well, that explains their weird view of TurboJesus.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    One thing these Teavangelical doomsayers do seem to understand is that humans do feel reciprocal obligations, and if someone apparently out of the goodness of their heart gives you something, you naturally tend to feel well-disposed to them in turn.

    I think the flaw here is not their model of human reciprocal obligation, it’s that they think leftists purposely misuse reciprocal obligation to try and get a hold over people.

    This seems to be bound up in the notion among right-wing folks in particular that a government would be incapable of being run by people who can both want to help the poor and impose reasonable limits on that help.

    It’s as though they imagine that only they hold THE secret of how to run a country and everybody else is by definition too irresponsible to do so.

    It’s of a piece with the tendency among some religious right-wing voters and politicians to imagine that they alone hold the true secret of how their faith ought to inform their actions.

  • Carstonio

    It’s as though they imagine that only they hold THE secret of how to run a country and everybody else is by definition too irresponsible to do so.

    These folks see the family as the microcosm for every other institution in society. Or more correctly, the family as headed by the father. It’s more than just their refusal to recognize that national economies don’t work the same as household budgets.Their distrust of human nature may appear to be tribalist, where they conveniently exclude people like themselves as not needing the same oversight. But they really see themselves as disciplinarian parents and everyone else as rebellious teenagers who need limits. That’s the subtext in every “what’s with people today” Tea Party rant I’ve ever heard.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I was also thinking it’s in line with the strain of morality that assumes everybody needs a Godhead-figure to regulate them. Just as God is supposed to be the one keeping people “in check” mentally, so too does the government have to not only keep people in line, but the government itself is presumed to have to be kept in line by the “correct” sort of people.

    This is actually a fairly authoritarian mode of thinking and ignores the fact that running a government responsibly isn’t a function of ideology so much as it is a function of wisdom and care.

  • Carstonio

    Yes. Most likely they’re projecting their ideas about stern fathers onto both their theology and their political ideology. Government is really a cooperative concept, where individuals in societies collaborate to obtain things together that they couldn’t obtain on their own. That includes enforcement of societal rules but far more than that. In my experience, people with this mentality either joke or state outright that a given miscreant simply needed more corporal punishment as a child.

  • Lunch Meat

    In my experience, people with this mentality either joke or state
    outright that a given miscreant simply needed more corporal punishment
    as a child.

    Yes. I have seen a facebook meme explicitly state that the reason we have so many gang members is because kids aren’t spanked enough. Because being gentle to your kids teaches them that violence is the best way to solve things!

  • http://jamoche.dreamwidth.org/ Jamoche

    But they really see themselves as disciplinarian parents and everyone else as rebellious teenagers who need limits

    And if you want a small scale example of that not working, that’s exactly how Gil Amelio came across to us in his brief unlamented term at Apple. I was there for the infamous “Don’t make me have to do this again” speech, which was in exactly the same tone as a parent saying “Don’t make me have to stop this car”. Say what you will about Steve Jobs, at least he considered us all grown-ups.

  • ohiolibrarian

    Funny given that the family is the most communistic organization we have.

  • Carstonio

    Um, I might consider it more socialistic than communistic. Perhaps a male headship family might resemble a communist dictatorship instead.

  • ohiolibrarian

    I was going by “From each according to he ability, to each according to his need” as popularized by Marx. That is exactly how families work (at least sometimes). I’ve never heard of infants paying their way, and in most families that I’m familiar with, although people do own things, ownership is a lot ‘squishier’ than would be consonant with strict property rights. Think of these common situations:

    1. Parents take away children’s stuff (clothing, toys, furnishings) as a punishment or for other reasons.

    2. The ‘family car’ that may be driven by anyone who is legally allowed to drive. Use of driving time may be negotiated as a limited resource, but not typically on the basis that the 16-year-old should not drive without buying zir own vehicle.

    3. Common areas in the home and yard are certainly treated as a communal resource.

    4. Kids typically get in trouble for ruining their dinner, not for eating snacks that belong to another family member. And leftovers, nobody owns leftovers.

    5. If you run out of toilet paper, toothpaste or sandwich bags (among other things) there is typically a stash of such items available to any family member who needs them.

    [added] I am going back to the root of ‘communism’–commune. You can also go all Biblical about it and go to Acts.

  • histrogeek

    I don’t think they imagine that they have any secret to running a country. It’s that they believe they are aristocrats, the anointed-by-God, born-to-rule group. It’s not that other people will rule worse than them; it’s that everyone else is a usurper who cannot legitimately rule.

    They try, badly at times, to talk around this. They don’t focus too much on anyone else’s incompetence (they can’t have anyone think that incompetence is grounds for removal given the obvious pinheads they’ve backed) unless it’s incompetence based on something they had a hand in. Like saying Obama is incompetent because he has managed to (magically) produce a budget deal. He’s a bad usurper and his failure is the result of his illegitimacy, not because the congressional GOP would rather eat glass than pass any budget he offers them.

  • banancat

    They completely understand the concept of reciprocal obligations, which is why they are more invested in the idea of chivalry than liberals. They are trying to make women feel obligated to conform their roles to return the favor of door openings and such. It’s also why I am hesitant to let men pay for my drinks or dinner. Sometimes it’s a nice gesture, just like a platonic friend would do, but I am especially suspicious of men who won’t let women pay for their own dinner.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    I can fully understand that suspicion. I’ve been wondering if there’s a link between this kind of behavior (I really don’t like calling it ‘chivalry’; that word has too many positive connotations) and sex entitlement, as if holding the door and lifting heavy burdens somehow paid advance toward getting in bed regardless of the woman’s feelings in the matter.

    It’s a disgusting thought, but it could explain some things, especially if it also overlaps with that particularly aggravating personality trait some people have where they seem to think having lifted a finger is a praiseworthy amount of effort. You know, the sort of people who, despite being old enough that they ought to know better, still act like little kids expecting their allowance because they took out the garbage once. They could be seeing even the slightest effort on their parts as such investment that women ought to be throwing themselves at them and resent that no such thing happens.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    I’ve been wondering if there’s a link between this kind of behavior (I really don’t like calling it ‘chivalry’; that word has too many positive connotations) and sex entitlement, as if holding the door and lifting heavy burdens somehow paid advance toward getting in bed regardless of the woman’s feelings in the matter.

    Yes. There are indications that if a man pays for everything, every time, he may feel “entitled” to sex.

    There have also been studies done showing that men who insist on paying for everything are likely to have controlling and abusive behaviours.

    I’ve read some advice for women that if you’re out on a date with a guy, always offer to go halvsies, or say something like, “Oh, you’re covering the movie fare? Great, I’ll cover popcorn and drinks” and see how your date reacts.

    (Sources: The Gift of Fear by Gavin de Becker, Some Girls Do by Margaret Leroy)

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    I hold doors open for the people walking behind me, but I do that for complete strangers regardless of their gender. I do it for the sake of, well, just being nice. I figure that the world would not be hurting if I add a few little acts of minor kindness here and there, but it might hurt a bit more if I let myself get too apathetic to the people around me.

    I guess I consider it a kind of practice. Might not that big a benefit of make a difference in the scheme of things, but it does not hurt me to do so, and others might appreciate it, so why not?

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Random acts of kindness are something else and I’m inclined to consider them benign. :p

  • banancat

    We’ve already discussed this on other threads about helping, but your presumption to help might not be nearly as helpful as you think. If you do hold doors for people, make sure you that you hold it only until they can grab it and hold it open for themselves. Don’t make a grand gesture of holding open while they walk past you. Don’t hold it if they’re more than a few steps away, because they will feel obligated to rush to return your (unasked for) favor. Don’t do it if it will make everything more awkward and difficult to navigate, such as in the small area between two sets of doors. Don’t do it on an elevator. And for the love of god, if someone makes any indication to let go of it, then let go of the door and move on with your life.

    Also, you may think you are applying this nice gesture equally, but you are almost certainly unconsciously biased at least to a certain small extent. I would bet real American dollars that you in the iffy in-between cases you are slightly more likely to hold a door for a woman, and even slightly more likely to hold it for a conventionally feminine woman, even if you don’t consciously intend that.

  • Veleda_k

    I find their totalitarian dictatorship wanting. For example, aside from dog whistles about Christian oppression (OMG), the first amendment seems fully in effect. There’s free press: the news lady states that the rebels are “gaining momentumn.” If I were a ruthless dictator, I’d never let anyone admit that the rebel movement had any popularity. “There is no war in Ba Sing Se,” after all. And freedom of assembly’s doing fine too. The courageous fighters are meeting in large groups out in the open, and I don’t see any tanks coming in reenact Tiananmen Square.

    As a fan of dystopian fiction, I am sorely disappointed.

  • Carstonio

    The writers outdid even LaHaye and Jenkins in not thinking through their dystopian premise. The title at the end extols the Tea Party’s support for free markets (by which they really mean gamed markets), yet we didn’t see the regime’s goons shutting down small businesses.

  • histrogeek

    Love the Avatar reference.

    Yeah, they can’t even apply modern tyrants to America. They apparently haven’t bothered to read The Prince or So You Want to Be a Bloodthirsty Tyrant. Utter fail.

  • Veylon

    Heck, they can’t even be bothered with real recent history. I don’t know whether to feel scorn or pity for people who believe they’re under some sort of oppressive government and yet have no idea how dangerous an actually oppressive government can be. Do they know what an agent provocateur is? Are they even vaguely aware that openly opposing a dictatorship is risky? Don’t they realize that the news would horribly biased against them and that any opposition would be characterized as some form of terrorism? “Anti-American Terrorist Traitors Betray Nation!”

  • Loki100

    Of course not. Being the Anti-Terrorists they could never conceive of a version of reality where they were considered terrorists. In fact, they are more than happy to give up any rights whatsoever related to hunting down terrorists.

  • Lori

    It’s not that they’re anti-terrorists, it’s that they’re white. Everyone knows that white people are not terrorists.

  • http://kingdomofsharks.wordpress.com/ D Johnston

    The trick is that if you pay attention, they believe that they’re living in a dystopia right now. The “evil” plan of the Big Evil Government is to make people “dependent,” and how often have you heard that from this crowd? The fact that their dystopia is perfectly mundane is a reflection of the fact that their real-world “tyrant” isn’t all that tyrannical.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Don’t they realize that the news would horribly biased against them and that any opposition would be characterized as some form of terrorism?

    They already think that is the case. They believe that the news media is biased against them, that there is some conspiracy of people who dominate the major news institutions who hate them and their ideas. Except Fox News, the one “good” one in the bunch.

    What was it Fred once said about how they have a rather twisted view of the righteous being persecuted? That they believe the converse must necessarily be true, and that if they are persecuted then they must necessarily be righteous?

  • Wonder

    oh, you didn’t see CPAC, even FOX is untrustworthy now, somebody’s launching a new network that doesn’t even have the pretense of not being a right-wing propaganda outlet.

  • P J Evans

    Yes, there are people in the Tea Party who consider Fox to be liberal (or at least too liberal for them).

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    The crackdown on the Tiananmen Square protestors began after over a month of protesting. Tea Party protests have, to my knowledge, never lasted that long.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Not in one shot, but add it up over the time period they’ve been A Thing, and it probably matches.

    Plus I think you are now indulging a fantasy in which the brave TeaBaggers march on Washington only to be crushed by that evil socialist Barack Obama.

    News flash: Nonviolent protesting is constitutionally protected free speech. So sry to disappoint.

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    Plus I think you are now indulging a fantasy in which the brave TeaBaggers march on Washington only to be crushed by that evil socialist Barack Obama.

    News flash: Nonviolent protesting is constitutionally protected free speech. So sry to disappoint.

    -The video was; I wasn’t.

  • http://loosviews.livejournal.com BringTheNoise

    Breaking News: The Scottish Independence Referendum has now been set for September 18th, 2014. I’ve written a very short blog about it here: http://loosviews.livejournal.com/9170.html

  • Kellen

    That’s going to be the worst prequel to the Hunger Games ever.

  • misanthropy_jones

    i think the syfy network should go ahead and make the movie. it would be even funnier than ‘mansquito’.

  • flat

    indentification cards and goverment support, the horror.

  • http://www.facebook.com/robtish Rob Tisinai

    So if the government is providing you with everything, then presumably people don’t have money to spend. So what sense does it make to pound on his door and say “You did not pay your contribution”?

  • Mrs Grimble

    And why would they need to send somebody to his door anyway? They could just turn him away when he next lines up for his rations; in fact, the public humiliation involved would be a better coercive.
    In any case, is there any reason they can’t just deduct his “contribution” from his account electronically? These days, a tyrannical government has no need to act like a small-time moneylender.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    It disturbs and enrages these people that someone could be comfortable without having to endure misery for their moments comfort. According to them, we should all slave away in factories and inside cubicles because that’s the right thing to do, regardless of whether or not it’s actually necessary.

  • JustoneK

    I get the impression that what is right is necessary, and vice versa.

  • http://twitter.com/shutsumon Becka Sutton

    I get the distinct impression that a lot of conservatives are lazy and assume everyone else is, so they think that if you give people stuff they’ll stop working or looking for work. (it’s roughly the same logic as needing hell to stop us killing each other).

    Of course there are jobs people wouldn’t do if they didn’t have to (which could be an issue) but most people would do something.

    Having said that that could serve as a setup for a dystopia if the government were trying a bread and circuses approach to pacify people to get crap in under the radar.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I get the distinct impression that a lot of conservatives are lazy

    Given that many of them seem to become business owners who show up once in a blue moon while loudly proclaiming what nose to the grindstone job creators they are, I’d say you’re right.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    [Conservatives] think that if you give people stuff they’ll stop working or looking for work.

    This experiment seems to indicate that most people will still work even if they’re not in danger of starving: http://www.dominionpaper.ca/articles/4100

  • http://twitter.com/shutsumon Becka Sutton

    Doesn’t surprise me. :-)

  • banancat

    I’m not really sure if they’re lazier on average than others, but I kind of see it differently. When I was in elementary school, I was very smart and excelled and got good grades. And there was a girl with special needs who got easier assignments and extra help. I generally liked her because I liked everyone, but every now and then I felt a deep resentment that she got to have it so easy. I wished that I could have the easy test and get an even better grade. I don’t think I ever took it so far as wondering if I could fake a learning disability to get easier work, but if I had stewed in that resentment for decades that “logical” conclusion might have occurred to me.

    Now I feel bad that I ever felt that way. My “excuse” is that I was a child. I outgrew that attitude before I even left elementary school because it was part of growing the fuck up.

    It took me a long time to put my experience into words, but now I realize that is the perfect example of privilege. She worked just as hard as I did, maybe harder. I had the privilege of schoolwork coming easily to me. Sure, I knew that she had a learning disability. I knew it, but I didn’t really understand it until a little later in life when I had matured. I never suspected that she was faking or slacking off. I just never identified with her experiences because I never had to, because I had the privilege not to.

    So conservatives think they will be unmotivated to work hard if others get “rewarded” without it, but only because they are completely unaware of their own motivation and how little it is based on risk vs reward. I excelled in school because I had many privileges, not because I ever made a conscious choice to be gifted so I could get praise and good grades.

  • ohiolibrarian

    It’s like that sin-focused Christianity that some people practice. If your focus is avoiding sin rather than some more positive motivation, you’ll think about sin a lot (on the principle that being told to NOT think of a elephant means … you think about an elephant). All the emphasis on not sinning or even THINKING about sinning means … thinking about sinning all the time. Always being in terror of falling into sin themselves, they also assume that everyone else thinks the way they do and since THOSE OTHERS are not ‘blessed by the spirit’ they must be going wild.

  • Stillaponyfan

    Um…is this serious? I’ve been reading the comments down here and i dont think anyone has asked that yet. Is this some sort of real thing they believe, and this is a thing? I kinda thouht this was some sort of parody. People aren’t really that way, right? Don’t most of these guys get government benefits?

    This doesn’t make alot of sense. does someone want to maybe help me out?

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    There’s a reason Poe’s Law is a thing. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poe%27s_law

    Short version: No matter how absurd the idea, it’s a given that someone, somewhere, believes it.

    We still have people who believe the Earth is flat. We still have people who believe the Earth is the literal center of the universe and that the Sun orbits it. We–sadly–have people who were happy when Sandy Hook Elementary was the scene of a spree shooting.

  • Stillaponyfan

    also thanks to you.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    No problem. I go through the same thing every now and then. I keep hoping it’s the fever breaking, a last and most severe eruption of delusional behavior before rationality breaks through and they realize science is okay, minorities mean them no harm, being loving is better than being hateful and movies like Ink deserve to be acknowledged by Hollywood.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    Ink was a gorgeous piece of film. Bless Netflix for bringing it to me.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    One of my favorite movies of all time, so wonderful for a budget of only $250K. Too bad Hulu no longer has it under the free listings. I found a copy on Youtube though.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IKfJYvN92oU

    Since it’s self-distribution, the directors/publishers/writers/composers/editors (wait, that’s all the same guy) have said they don’t really mind the piracy — which is why Hollywood is absolutely refusing to consider Ink as having any legitimate success. It’s not making Hollywood money, so it’s not a real true movie.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Ah heck, big warning up front, movie literally opens with vulgarity. Also has some violence, though a lot less than the average AAA producer flick. Also brief depiction of suicide.

  • Lori

    To understand this video you have to have some understanding of CPAC. How can I put this without falling into offensive (semi-)hyperbole? CPAC attendees are quite far over to the Right and they tend to be rather intense. It’s the GOP convention after all the “mainstream” folks have been filtered out, leaving just the really looney parts of their lunatic fringe. Lots of hardcore theocrats. Lots of out and proud xenophobic bigots. Plenty of militia movement and militia adjacent folks.

    The people who put this video together believe quite a lot of things
    that do not mesh with objective reality and they were appealing to
    others like them. Riding the Metro during CPAC was always an adventure. The conversations I overheard. Oy. Yes, they actually believe this stuff is what I’m saying.

  • Stillaponyfan

    I am sorry you were subjected to that. Thank you for your response.

    Now, Im going to go and try an establish a colony on mars. Very very far away from these people. Because…fuck. Just, fuck.

  • P J Evans

    Better to establish a colony on Mars and send ‘these people’. (Fewer of them to send.)

  • Müntzer

    It would nice as a movie trailer (though it would be one of those hammy popcorn movies that have no particular depth or political message) but as teaser for themselves?
    Are they NUTS?

  • ohiolibrarian

    The question answers itself.

  • Nirrti

    Shhh! Y’all hear that? That’s the sound of all the neighborhood pets howling at the sound of all those blatant dog whistles in that trailer.

  • Nirrti

    Oh, and I’ve seen better acting from my niece’s preschool play about the “Three Little Pigs”..

  • P J Evans

    I’m probably an evil person: I kept waiting for that flimsy filmy garment the woman is wearing to drift over a bit too close to that way-the-heck-obviously-symbolic torch.

  • Lori

    It could happen. That woman clearly has zero situational awareness.

    Also, I find it amusing that her filmy garment thing looks like a choir rob worn backwards over a sundress. You’ve got to love the Low Production Values R Us feel of the thing.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    “We have a Resistance fighter who’s a black woman! She’s in a few short scenes and gets no dialogue, but this proves we’re totally not racist!”

  • Carstonio

    Oh, I was looking carefully for anyone who wasn’t white, and I suspected that any minority in the clip would be used as a token.

  • http://twitter.com/SnarkLord Your Future Overlord

    OMG! The poor are getting care packages! Save us, bizarrely angry white guy and your army of token nonspeaking part minorities!

  • http://againstjebelallawz.wordpress.com/ Enopoletus Harding

    “Freedom” from supporters of the PATRIOT Act? Thanks, but no thanks.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    Okay. Remove a bit of the OTT stylistic stuff and make the production values slightly better and this looks exactly like a low-budget web-original series I watched not long ago.

    THat one ended with the only member of the resistance who wasn’t willing to murder an innocent woman to further their cause being executed by the resistance’s second-highest ranking guy, who is explicitly a white supremacist (The guy who gets executed points out that they all joined up for different reasons, one to protect gun rights, one for lower taxes, one for abstract freedomy reasons, and one to “ensure a future for the white race”)

  • Lori

    I want to believe that you are making that up, and yet I know that you aren’t.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Wow. I’m getting that feeling of watching a train wreck, and I must now see this thing. Is it subtitled?

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    Was the series supposed to have a “careful what revolutionary organizations you hook up with” message?

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    Honestly I’m not sure. For the first half or so, I assumed it was your typical ‘The government’s gone bad and these noble resistors must set it right’ dystopia, but then they turned around and had the resistance cell put the only character with any depth to him on trial for not murdering an innocent person in cold blood. Honestly, I think it was probably too incoherent to have a deliberate message

  • Darakou

    I just realised these people would blow a fuse if I told them what happened here in Australia just after the GFC hit. The government approved one-off stimulus payments of $900 each to every Australian taxpayer. And that’s the story of how I got my PS3.

  • David Starner

    There was a $300 tax rebate bonus given out by George W. Bush. It seems the only thing they object to is giving to people who need it; ignoring the deficit and giving out money to everyone in good times is fine.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    The fun part was when people did their taxes the year after, a lot of them found they were actually *owing* tax, because that $300 was technically an advance on next year’s tax refund.

    That shifty son of a bitch figured out a way to look like a tax-cutter without blowing a $300 billion hole in the US budget.

  • AnonaMiss

    Ah, but the tax rebate only applied to people who made enough to owe taxes! So the money only went to those who deserved it.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    This begs to be parodied, the same way that NOM “There’s a storm coming” video was parodied.

  • Lori

    So, speaking of funny/horrible movies produced by the Right wing id—-I had somehow missed the fact that the villain in Olympus Has Fallen” is North Korea. North Korea carrying out perfectly coordinated high-tech attacks on US soil. The hell?

  • AnonaMiss

    Remember, we can’t cast China as the villain in a movie, because China is a major market!

  • Lori

    I don’t object to NK as villain per se, but there’s a way to go about it and this and the Red Dawn remake are not it. The notion of them invading the US is ridic.

  • Jenny Islander

    When I first heard about it, I thought it had to be about a planeful of delusional and ridiculously naive North Korean bigwigs who had been sent to an isolated lodge in the U.S. for reasons that made sense to whatsisname, but thought that they were in some kind of amusement park, with animatronic targets that screamed realistically when shot.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    That could make for some excellent black humour.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    I have this theory that about 4 years ago, someone found a sealed crate in hollywood of leftover US-vs-the-Reds scripts from the 80s that had been locked away since Glasnost, and they’ve been hastily crossing out all instances of “Moscow” to pencil in “Pyongyang” ever since.

  • http://twitter.com/FearlessSon FearlessSon

    There is a reason TvTropes calls it (and similar) “The Great Political Mess Up“. Suddenly a lot of story ideas became obsolete.

  • http://www.metagalacticllamas.com/ Triplanetary

    Brilliant. No doubt Hollywood is thrilled to have an evil Communist country to serve as their villain again. It’s just like old times! Hollywood got a fair bit of mileage out of Muslim terrorism, of course (a trend that actually started in the 90s, but really took off after 9/11, needless to say), but the fact that we were the invaders in their countries in a lot of those movies introduced an uncomfortable degree of moral ambiguity.

  • Brightwater

    Un-fracking-believable.

  • exoraluna

    I only watched 1 time, but this is what jumped out at me:
    The Xtian cross
    The very end where in flames they wipe out
    Fiscal Responsibility
    Constitutionally Limited Government
    Free Markets
    And leave the Tea-Party Patriots

    Freudian, I suppose?

  • lawrence090469

    No people of color? Sadly, that makes sense. No gerriatrics? No hoverrounds? This IS the Tea Party we are talking about here.

  • LivinginVA

    The full-length one is even scarier.


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