7 things @ 1 o’clock (8.21)

1. Weren’t we just talking about “faith-healing” televangelist Benny Hinn as a transparent huckster and goofball? Here he is interviewing an alleged “ex-gay therapist” on his TV show. This guy doesn’t use the discredited pseudo-science of “reparative therapy.” Instead, he says, his approach “is based on numbers, is based on studies, which is what you do when you’re a scientist.”

By this he means that he has his patients color with crayons, claiming that their choice of colors allows him to “see demonization in people’s brains.” He does not mean this as a metaphor.

“Seven designs of Initial Keys for the back covers of the ‘Keynote’ series” by Aubrey Beardsley, born August 21, 1872.

2. You know that Gen-Xers are getting older when all we can do is stare in bewilderment at a younger generation’s idea of fashion. But I’m with Erik Loomis on this one: In the 1990s, anyone accused of going to a tanning salon would deny it out of sheer embarrassment. To admit to paying money for such a thing was mortifyingly uncool. But fake, unhealthy and expensive is apparently the new cool. (Also too: Get off my lawn and turn that music down.)

3. Religion News Service has a wonderful photo slideshow of the 1963 March on Washington.

4. North CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth CarolinaNorth Carolina.

5. I’m disappointed that TBogg is retiring and that David Roberts is taking a yearlong hiatus. But I’m thrilled that Sarah Masen is again recording music that the rest of us will get to hear.

6. “When you say you’re against it, you’re saying that you don’t want people like me to have health insurance.” The subject there is Obamacare. The writer is cancer survivor Clint Murphy, Republican of Georgia.

7. Speaking of … here’s Jo Hilder on “What to Say Instead of ‘One Day This Will All Make Sense to You’“:

Rather than using a cliche like “You don’t understand this now, but one day you’ll appreciate why it had to happen” perhaps simply say “No, it doesn’t make sense to me either” or “I wish I could say I know how you feel, but I don’t know how you feel. But I do care about how you feel.”

When it comes to the really hard stuff in life, when someone says “I don’t know either,” it doesn’t mean there are two stupid people in the room. It means there’s lots of love in the room. Knowing and understanding everything isn’t everything. But love helps, a lot.

 

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Postcards from the culture wars (8.24)
'You're better than this' vs. 'You should be ashamed of yourself'
Now we get moose and squirrel
Here's what you do when an erratic bigot hijacks your party nomination
  • aunursa
  • connorboone

    Wow. Profits of $1.79 BILLION last QUARTER, and the ACA is going to hurt them so much that they need to save 60 MILLION a YEAR by dropping coverage for spouses?

    Somehow, I don’t think that regulatory changes are at fault here.

    http://www.investors.ups.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=62900&p=irol-newsArticleEarnings&ID=1839930&highlight=

  • aunursa

    Without the ACA, UPS would not be dropping coverage for those people. The loss of coverage is a direct result of the ACA.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Or a direct result of unrepentant greed and contempt of their employees. But, y’know, totally the ACA if the argument is convenient. It’s just like how restaurants could blame having colored-people fountain signs for their lack of business and it was totally the colored people’s fault for being in the neighborhood.

  • connorboone

    Or greed at the corporate office is using the ACA as cover.

  • Ross Thompson

    Without the ACA, UPS would not be dropping coverage for those people.

    How do you know?

  • Wednesday

    Groundhog Day time loop, spanning multiple years.

    Anursa’s desperately trying to head off a disaster sometime in the future. Due to the convoluted nature of causality, including chaos theory etc etc, it turns out that averting that disaster involves bringing public support polling numbers for the ACA into a very narrow threshold. There have been loops where those numbers dipped too low too soon, and he was at loggerheads with all of us in comments arguing in _favor_ of the ACA.

    He’s been through this long loop more times than he’s been able to count, and it always ends with the loss of everything and everyone he ever loved. It’s a wonder that he hasn’t gone mad with the burden and the loneliness. The one constant throughout the loops — no matter the tweaks he makes, large or small – are the brilliance of Fred’s Left Behind posts. (Well, except for that loop where somehow everyone became flesh-eating zombies.)

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    Because they said so, and they wouldn’t LIE, would they?

  • Ross Thompson

    If architectural paintings had been more popular in post-WWI Germany, Hitler would have become a professional artist rather than go into politics. Therefore, the holocaust is a direct result of the art market.

    Did I do it right?

  • Random_Lurker

    Without the ACA, they’d be using a different conniving excuse to do the same thing. As they have been for 15-20 years now.

    Corruption is corrupt. That’s how it works.

  • LL

    You’re right, in that “Obamacare” is just the excuse that many companies need to cut healthcare expenses while having a convenient scapegoat for those cuts. Before, they might have actually had to answer for them. Now they can just croak, “Obamacare made us do it!” and then move on. Healthcare costs were going to go up regardless (as they have been annually, by double digits in some years), now they get to blame it on the black president.

  • Baby_Raptor

    The dropping of coverage is a direct result of people being greedy about money.

    The ACA has nothing to do with that. It’s just the vehicle that greed is being channeled through.

    The company I work for announced about 2 weeks ago that they’re “looking into” dropping our healthcare (which is pretty much dire emergency only as is) because enrollment for Arkansas’ ACA set-up starts in October. No word yet on what we’re supposed to do for healthcare between October and January, or what people who don’t qualify are going to do. What matters is that apparently, the company I work for would save money just paying the fines.

  • stardreamer42

    No, the loss of coverage is the direct result of EMPLOYER GREED using the ACA as a cover story. If it wasn’t for the ACA, they’d have found something else to use.

  • http://accidental-historian.typepad.com/ Geds

    You remind me of this one time I got into a bit of a kerfuffle with a guy who was trying to claim Seattle Public Schools are terrible because there weren’t enough white students. And also there weren’t enough white students because the schools are terrible. It was a bit of the ol’ chicken-egg logic with the fellow.

    Either way, at one point he actually framed his argument by saying that desegregation and busing caused white people to flee to the suburbs or private schools back in the ’60s. My response was, “No, racism caused white people to flee from Seattle Public Schools. Desegregation was the appropriate step for the government to take to end a societal ill and saying that that step directly caused white flight is to ignore that the white people who fled had two options: stick around and see what would happen or be irrationally racist about the whole thing.

    Similarly, the Affordable Care Act hasn’t caused employers to cut hours, increase part timers, or drop insurance. Selfish assholes in charge of multi-billion dollar corporations who have suddenly seen their profit margin sliced by a tiny bit decided to use the Affordable Care Act as an excuse to be selfish assholes.

    Meanwhile, I haven’t failed to notice that insurance rates went up/were projected to go up in states like Texas that have been bitching about the ACA and haven’t fully implemented the exchanges. Over in California where there was enthusiastic support the big surprise was how low the insurance companies on the exchange were willing to go.

    It’s almost like the assholes who want to get rid of the ACA come hell or high water are making a self-fulfilling prophecy out of their projections. Crazy, right?

  • AnonaMiss

    (With the additional caveat that it seems like half or more of the examples Aunursa brings us are of public-sector employees, for which blaming layoffs & time reductions on the ACA is like blaming only the final straw as an undue burden on the camel.)

  • P J Evans

    In Texas, Rick ‘Goodhair’ Perry is still making speeches against Obamacare, but at the same time, he wants the federal government to send money for healthcare.
    I feel like telling him, ‘dude, you can have the money with Obamacare, or you can have neither.’

  • Sagrav

    So aunursa, let’s say you could somehow eliminate the ACA. What would you replace it with? Before the ACA, health insurance providers could deny or drop coverage for customers for virtually any reason. What would all of those individuals who require health insurance do without the ACA?

    You are a conundrum to me. Half of the time, your posts here are reasonable, and you express empathy for your fellow human beings. The rest of the time you spend defending the actions of the very rich and powerful against the very poor and vulnerable. As another poster here pointed out, UPS makes billions of dollars in profit. They could easily absorb the extra $60 million that they stand to save by giving their employees’ spouses the shaft. Most of the other companies cited in your articles could also absorb this cost with minimal impact on their massive profit margins. Doing so may even increase worker productivity as employees who have access to fast and effective healthcare are able to work harder and take less time off to recover from illness.

    These employers’ actions are both cruel and short sighted. Why are you consistently defending them?

  • Consumer Unit 5012

    So aunursa, let’s say you could somehow eliminate the ACA. What would you replace it with?

    [sarcasm]
    The vastly superior and proven option: Romneycare!

    WHICH IS TOTALLY DIFFERENT because SHUT UP, that’s why.
    [/sarcasm]

    Semi-seriously, do the Republicans actually HAVE a plan that’s not “repeal Obamacare, then let the proles die in the streets from pre-existing conditions”? Because if so, I’m not seeing it.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Nah, aunursa wouldn’t point at Romneycare. He most likely wouldn’t bother answering the question. His purpose isn’t to discuss anything, just to stir up shit, same as any troll.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    I believe their official position is “We’ll think of something. But it’s absolutely essential that our perfect replacement remain an absolute secret until we’ve repealed Obamacare.”

  • Kubricks_Rube
  • AnonaMiss

    To be fair, just showing a trendline without also projecting what the trendline would have been without X, Y and Z isn’t especially helpful. It’s possible that without the ACA, full-time jobs would have grown at twice the rate that they did.

    I don’t think it’s likely, but you know, standards of evidence and all that.

    (ISTR that without the ACA, health insurance premiums were projected to go up much faster than they are doing with the ACA, but job growth is one of those hot-button trends where I just tune out everyone’s predictions because they always seem so full of bullshit.)

  • Kubricks_Rube

    Agreed, it’s possible full time job growth could have been stronger without the ACA, but it’s important to push back on the false notion that part time jobs are rapidly replacing full time jobs.

    Also, where such changes are an issue, the recession is the real culprit. Here’s what the article aunursa linked to says about it:

    Economists and staffing companies are cautiously optimistic that part-time hiring and the low wages environment will fade away as the economy regains momentum, starting in the second half of this year and through 2014.

    But businesses, accustomed to functioning with fewer workers, might not be in a hurry to change course. A study by financial analysis firm Sageworks found that profit per employee at privately held companies jumped to more than $18,000 in 2012 from about $14,000 in 2009.

    “Private employers are either able to make more money with fewer employees or have been able to make more money without hiring additional employees,” said Sageworks analyst Libby Bierman. “The lesson learned for businesses during the recession was to have lean operations.”

  • ohiolibrarian

    Want to bet that NONE (or at best few) of the benefits of all the increased productivity go to the employees? Because that’s how it has been going for the last 40 years or so.

  • LoneWolf343

    Yeah, but allowing for that argument allows for a plethora of perfectly logical silliness. You can invent entire worlds full of magic and wonder, the only wall between such and reality being “What if…”

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    So, if you subtract the 15,000 UPS spouses from the estimated 6.6 million people newly covered thanks to the ACA…. Yeah, that’s an obvious loss.

  • Fusina

    Why is UPS dropping the health care? Is it going to be more expensive for the company to pay the share they contracted to pay? If it is, how much more will it cost them? If it is not costing more, why are they dropping the spouses? These are questions I need to know the answers to before I judge the company. On the other hand, I have heard reports that health costs for both end user and employer have dropped where the state has gone all in for the ACA, and has risen in states that are fighting it. So, based on that math, I would guess that UPS is determined to be asses. Whatevs, I use USPS to mail packages anyway. UPS is way too expensive.

  • Nequam

    Considering that UPS *also* uses UPS to send packages (I am not kidding), that’s a prudent move on your part.

  • Nequam

    Gah, meant UPS also uses USPS. Damn you near-identical acronyms!

  • Lori

    This is not courtesy of the ACA. This is courtesy of fucking assholes who are happy to hurt people in order to get their way. Those assholes are the people you side with and agree with and support.

  • Albanaeon

    Well, they should have lobbied for single payer when they had the chance.

  • myeck waters

    “United Parcel Service Inc. plans to remove thousands of spouses from its medical plan because they are eligible for coverage elsewhere.”
    So, the truth is, they’re being jerks, but they’re only being jerks to people who have other access to health insurance.

  • damanoid

    This is terrible. If this keeps up, America will have an unemployment rate similar to Canada, where universal health care has resulted in no jobs whatsoever. They are eating each other up there, I hear.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    I am totally having my neighbour for breakfast right now.

  • glendanowakowsk

    North Carolina #5:

    “Do you want me to give a thoughtful answer?” Pittenger asked.

    “I want yes or no,” the tea partier demanded.

    This speaks volumes.

  • aunursa

    Without looking at the question, I would say that both are wrong.

    The respondent should give the answer in the form: “Yes/No because…” Too often politicians and pundits refuse to give a yes or no answer, not because they don’t have a yes-or-no answer, but because they don’t want to. I would have more respect for a politician who answers a yes-or-no question with a long answer that begins with “Yes” or “No” — even if I don’t like the answer itself.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    And if the question was something like “Do you believe religion has any place in public schools?”, where the answer is neither yes or no, even with a “because”?

  • aunursa

    Then the answer could be something like,
    “Yes and No. Yes, for A & B … but No for C, D, or E….”

  • Ross Thompson

    Where A through E are various religions?

  • chgo_liz

    And these kinds of exchanges happen all the time, right? A tea-partier will just sit there and politely listen to a response that goes on for several sentences?

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    I bet on average the tea partier will say STOP CONFUSING ME WITH YOUR FANCY LIBERAL ACADEMIC DOUBLE-TALK, and then proceed to bang on with some kind of Reaganite bootstraps rhetoric.

  • MaryKaye

    If you are being filmed or recorded, you quickly learn NEVER to say “Yes” or “No” to a question for which that’s not an adequate answer, because you run a huge risk that the filmer or recorder will cut your answer and all of your careful hedges will be gone.

    I see no easy way to prevent this–how could we outlaw selective quote trimming?–so I think it’s best never to say Yes unless you mean Yes.

    The best answer to “Does religion have any place in public schools?” for me would look like “Individual students and teachers are free to believe as they wish. The school institution must not promote or support any religion.” It’s hard to cut that harmfully. “Yes” or “No” invites malicious or simply thoughtless cutting down to something that’s not what I believe.

  • Alix

    This doesn’t always work, but one trick to prevent selective editing is to add a lilt to something like a “yes” if you plan to explain further – cutting the explanation still leaves the lilt or rising tone, which the audience hears as a clear sign that the statement was truncated.

  • MarkTemporis

    Even worse, without giving an explanation, a REALLY unethical video tech could just clip your answer and use it for any question he wants!

    “Do you acknowledge Satan as your lord and master?”

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    So, Fox News?

  • Launcifer

    Nah, given the Fox attitude to such trifling irrelevancies as proof-reading, I have no doubt that some anchor or other would breathlessly announce that all Democrats worshipped Santa.

  • Vermic

    Incidentally, the question had to do with whether Pittenger would vote to shut down the government in order to defund Obamacare. Reminder: there are citizens who are unhappy at the thought that their government will not be shut down.

  • Jenny Islander

    “We don’t want a workable solution! We don’t want an unworkable solution! We want a National Socialist solution!”

    Godwin aside, the more I read about Tea Party rhetoric and behavior, the more worried I get about what might happen if they grew themselves a genuine demagogue. It’s the same poisonous crap that bad painter tapped into, just with different labels.

  • stardreamer42

    My response to that would have been along the lines of, “Okay, you don’t want a real answer and I’m not going to do a sound bite. Next question?”

  • Michael Pullmann

    That nitwit Rand Paul was on The Daily Show last week claiming young people don’t need comprehensive coverage. I know he can’t hear me, but I yelled “What about people like me who’ve been on medication since we were 12?” anyway.
    .
    There may also have been something about his mother.

  • http://loosviews.livejournal.com BringTheNoise

    I was unaware that there was an age limit on some medical conditions. What a turd.

  • banancat

    Yeah, sure would’ve been nice if my hypothyroidism decided to kick in at exactly 40 instead of 19. It’s less common for it to manifest at such an early age, but I’m nothing if non-conformist.

  • LoneWolf343

    Oh, really? I thought hypothyroidism was something you were born with.

    Or was this sarcasm?

  • banancat

    It’s hereditary (thought not strictly Mendelian like many disease) and it is possible for it to manifest from birth, but most commonly it starts in middle age.

  • chgo_liz

    One of the biggest life stressors causing it to manifest is pregnancy. That’s one reason significantly more women than men suffer from autoimmune disorders such as hypothyroidism.

  • Random_Lurker

    Ironic that “self responsibility” twats will take away the treatment and medication that’s needed for those of us with mental health problems to actually have the ability to become self responsible.

    I really think that all they want is to punish poor people. Their actual explanations don’t make sense.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    You leave Rand Paul’s mother alone. She’s got problems enough; have you seen the asshole she‘s married to?

  • Lori

    She chose him. It’s not like Ron’s nutterdom and meanness are new things. No sympathy from me.

  • Jenny Islander

    Has he seriously never known a child with Type 1 diabetes in his life? Cancer? Severe burns? Cerebral palsy? No matter how rich he is, can his money really insulate him from seeing any sick child ever?

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Short answer: Yes. Yes, it absolutely can. Gated communities with strict standards on what kind of people are allowed to live there, and
    social hierarchies which make having a sickly child into a contemptible sin.

  • Alix

    In addition to AnonymousSam’s point, these are often the same people who very firmly believe that disabled, sick, or fat people are eyesores and should keep out of sight of “real” people.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    In fairness, in context, it seems like the sense he was going for was “Lots of young people want the option to save a buck by forgoing insurance,” not “No young person would benefit from insurance”

    But this is still in the same vein as his (or was Pere Paul?) fucknuttery from during the election about how whether or not their bosses can sexually harass them is something women should negotiate for in their contracts because surely some women would rather have a higher salary in exchange for the boss being allowed to occasionally grope them.

  • ohiolibrarian

    Well, that takes care of Bob Filner’s problem. He just neglected to contractually obligate all those women.

    Have you noticed that the Pauls (father and son) are remarkably hierarchical, not to mention authoritarian, for so-called “libertarians”. Apparently in their world “inferiors” (not sure whether the women are inferior because it is their boss doing the groping or just because they are women) can only put up with obnoxious behavior or quit. A hundred years ago, if some guy put his hands on you, you could at least slap him.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    Augh, I know. “Oh, most of the uninsured are just young people thinking they’re immortal”? I was yelling, “Fuck, I wish Jon Stewart were back, he’d call him out on this nonsense!” Though to be fair, Stewart doesn’t always call out his guests’ bullshit.

  • MarkTemporis

    Stewart is downright respectful to the worst people. I remember he wasn’t terribly hard on Rick Santorum, David Barton, and Mike Huckabee.

    Oliver actually struck me as asking better questions, but he wasn’t as hard on Paul as he got on Kirsten Gillibrand, who he openly supported at the top of the interview.

  • Ross Thompson

    I’ve always appreciated that about Stewart; he can vehemently disagree with someone, and express that disagreement without shutting down the interview.

    Pretty much every other TV interview is either a mutual masturbation session or it’s people shouting at each other for murdering puppies. But Stewart can give people an opportunity to explain themselves to a hostile audience, and he listens to them and responds to what they say. I agree that he can be overly respectful, but given the rest of TV interviews, I think that’s a good thing.

  • http://shiftercat.livejournal.com/ ShifterCat

    Stewart will often find ways to call people out while still being respectful, which I value. But there are many occasions when I really wish he were harder on his guests, like, “excuse me, but no, that thing you just said simply isn’t true.” David Barton could definitely use several doses of that.

  • http://blog.trenchcoatsoft.com Ross

    Yeah. The Barton interview was painful to watch. He’s normally better about calling out that sort of shit.

  • redsixwing

    So, coloring a picture of the thing colloquially referred to as “grey matter” actually grey is a mark of ‘demonization.’ Neat.

  • Vermic

    Who would color a brain black, though? I don’t believe in demons, but that is an unusual choice. Not that “Black Brain” wouldn’t be an excellent band and/or supervillain name.

  • Alix

    …Well, I would. Just to fuck with people, mostly.

    I decided in kindergarten that coloring things properly was for losers. XD

  • P J Evans

    I remember in HS, in art, we had an assignment to design and furnish a room (including paint color), and one of the guys did his with black walls. The teacher wasn’t happy, but allowed that it was within the parameters.

  • GDwarf

    When my family moved into our current house many of the walls were painted black, grey, and navy blue. Save for one bathroom that was hot pink. That colour scheme lasted all of a day before steps were taken.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Oh yeah. I’d be all OH MY GOD GET THAT OUT OF MY EYES if I had to go to the bathroom with the walls painted hot pink.

  • The_L1985

    My grandparents have a bathroom with pink walls. Not quite hot-pink, but still closer to something Barbie would wear than to a color you’d want on your wall.

    My grandmother forgot, when she painted it years ago, that paint colors tend to be a bit darker than the samples, so it wouldn’t be the nice powder-pink she was expecting. And then she left it that same pink for 40 years, because why not?

    I don’t think it’s so bad, but that may be because I grew up seeing it like that.

  • Jenny Islander

    Somewhere on the Web there is an ad for a belowground apartment in NYC–apparently in one of those brownstones where each floor was turned into an apartment, and this one is in the former servants’ work area downstairs. The whole thing is done in black marble. Black marble floors, black marble countertops, black marble walls up to about chin level. Black fridge, boxed-in beams covered in what I hope is faux black marble veneer, black ceiling.

    It’s advertised as “for the ladies.”

  • Alix

    …I actually think that sounds kind of awesome. >.< But then, I'm the person who used to watch interior decorating shows on HGTV and yell at the screen whenever they went on about how dark colors make a room feel smaller.

    "What, you don't want me to feel COZY and SNUG? What if I WANT to feel like I'm living in a cave, what THEN, HUH?" XD

  • darchildre

    I do exactly the same thing. Open spaces make me uneasy and brightness makes me cranky.

    I figure that being an solitary adult means that I get to make my living space as much like a mole cave as I want.

  • Alix

    I go to Home Depot on a pretty regular basis to collect paint chips for weird collages, and I was so excited a few years back because they started selling a brand of paint that is textured like rock. Now that I’m moving to a place I actually own, I may buy some and make my home really feel like a cave. XD

  • alfgifu

    When we moved into our current house, my husband observed that the purple walls in the front bedroom clashed with the blue carpet, and the silver walls in the back bedroom clashed with the universe. The previous owners had strong colour preferences (another room was painted an eye-watering mix of rubber duck yellow and London bus red).

  • The_L1985

    Wow, and I thought that the gray-and-hunter-green house had a crappy color scheme.

  • The_L1985

    My family once moved into a house where ALL of the walls (4 bed, 3.5 bath, plus a basement) were a pale gray. Think “just-barely overcast on a very snowy day.” Well, except for the kitchen, laundry room, and dining room. Those were all hunter green.

    We still don’t know what the previous owners were thinking, but wallpaper was purchased VERY quickly so we could cover over it in the bathrooms. (Yes, only in the bathrooms. I got to sleep surrounded by those monstrous walls for another 7 years before my parents finally got everything repainted.

  • http://www.oliviareviews.com/ PepperjackCandy

    I the late 70s, we moved into a house where the rooms were either drably brown or bright red. Let’s take the main floor: the entryway was just a little bit grayer than refried beans and the living and dining rooms were cream with gold accents. The kitchen had red-and-yellow flowers with big green leaves on two walls and red-and-green plaid on the other two, and the stairway to the basement was red and black.

    I’m not really one to talk, though. My bedroom is peach. And not a soft, gentle peach either. It’s bright. But it makes me happy and is worth it, even if I do have to repaint to a slightly less exciting color when we eventually sell the house.

  • Mrs Grimble

    In the late 70s, I moved into a council house where every room, including the bathroom, had two adjoining walls painted orange and the other two walls painted purple; the ceilings were white and all the woodwork beige. It looked very, um, 70s.
    The neighbours told me that the previous tenant was a council worker who had pinched the paint from his depot, hence the limited colour scheme.

  • Original Lee

    My dad had to share a room with his three brothers. As an incentive to harmony, my grandparents allowed each boy to paint a wall any color he wanted. This lasted about two weeks because the color choices were too dissonant. Then they got to take turns painting the whole room whatever color they wanted. I think the room got repainted once a year. One brother painted the walls Chinese red with big black and white polka dots, which the others conceded was pretty cool, until it was time to repaint the room and they ended up using something like six cans of paint to cover over the Chinese red enough that the next brother could get the effect he wanted.

    My mother’s house has a very open floor plan, and when she bought it, the main area had one white wall, one avocado green wall, one dusty rose wall, and one yellow wall. The wool wall-to-wall carpet was black-and-white tweed. That room got repainted to all white real fast and stayed that way for years, because it took that long for Mom to stop mentally trying to match one of the former wall colors when she was looking at paint chips.

    Original Spouse and I once looked at a house that had clearly been decorated from the clearance section at Home Depot. The bathroom in particular was a real treat – powder blue bathtub, avocado green toilet, pale yellow sink, glass tile with flecks of gold on the ceiling, brown-and pink tile on the floor, black-and-white tile on 1.5 of the walls (not adjacent), cobalt blue tile on the rest of the walls, hot pink medicine cabinet. The window looked as if it belonged on a pickup truck. Good times.

  • banancat

    When I was in kindergarten my teacher joked to my mother (in private, told to me years later) that I would never be an artist because I didn’t color within the lines. It turned out to be a surprisingly accurate metaphor for my entire life, but my teacher wasn’t trying to use it a cudgel to make me pretend to be a different person.

  • Ross Thompson

    A couple of years ago, when my then four-year-old daughter was colouring, she used to insist “Grandma says I have to stay inside the lines”. I tried to explain that I disagreed; she needed to be able to stay inside the lines, but once she’s demonstrated that, colouring outside the lines was a perfectly valid choice.

  • The_L1985
  • MaryKaye

    When I was six we were house-hunting. The only house I remember was the one where, my mother speculated, they had let the kids decorate. The living room was done in black and white op-art patterns. The dining room was done in giant polka dots. Each stair leading upstairs had a different color of carpet. Only the master bedroom was painted normally.

    I loved it, but my mother wouldn’t buy it; she said she’d have to repaint the whole thing.

  • alfgifu

    When I was about that age our house was extended, and my brother and I had our own rooms for the first time. We were told we could pick the colours. I picked white and he picked black. Funnily enough, they asked us to pick again. He ended up going for quite a dark green. I asked for something which I thought was off-white.

    Imagine my horror, a couple of days later, when I was invited to look at the beautiful new room and found they had painted it princess pink. And gone and bought me these pretty floral curtains and bedding to go with it.

    I’m not sure where the mistake crept in – possibly with the painter rather than with my parents – but I didn’t want to hurt anyone’s feelings so I didn’t admit how much I loathed it for years.

  • MaryKaye

    One should bear in mind, though, that a solid black room is next to impossible to light.

    Our apartment building in Berkeley had an elevator which was extremely dark brown with black carpet, and it was dark in there even with the light on–a weird effect.

  • Alix

    …Which actually all sounds pretty cool. But I’m a person who likes low light and dark spaces, so.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    By this he means that he has his patients color with crayons, claiming
    that their choice of colors allows him to “see demonization in people’s
    brains.” He does not mean this as a metaphor.

    (O_O)

    If I had absolutely no sense of shame or personal responsibility I could probably become a rich flimflammer like this guy.

    How much does he clip people for this “therapy”?

  • LoneWolf343

    I have said before that you don’t need intelligence to be cunning. You just have to lack morals.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Stephen King (of all people) frequently described antagonistic characters as having “smart-stupid little pig’s eyes,” referring to a kind of cunning greed that had nothing to do with intellect. It’s about being just smart enough to know what you want, to make efforts at getting it, and to care not a bit what kind of harm is done in the process.

  • J_Enigma32

    Hey, that’s a good (but minority) percentage of the Party you just described. The remainder varies between:

    “You’ve gotta crack a few eggshells to make an omelet”,
    “You mean those people exist?”
    “They don’t exist, you’re making that up. This is America. We don’t have poor people in America”
    And varying degrees of ideologically enforced stupidity.

    And then you get ones like Mr. Propaganda, Captain of Industry, from the second book*. Men who know they’re making the world worse and simply don’t care, because it makes them money and they only care about themselves.

    * Whose rough draft I’m almost done with. If you know my writing style, this is a good thing, since I go through, on average, 12 rough drafts before I get one I like enough to polish into a final copy.

  • Kubricks_Rube

    Whenever someone says, “You’ve gotta crack a few eggshells to make an omelet,” I say that we’re all making omelets, the disagreement is on which eggshells to crack.

  • VMink

    It’s worth noting that one of the oft-repeated precepts of English Common Law is, Blackstone’s Formulation: “It is better that ten guilty persons escape than that one innocent suffer” It was quoted by Thomas Jefferson and Ben Franklin. I’ve often extended this to social programs, too, because for all the talk about ‘welfare queens’ (a myth as it is) if you destroy these programs you’re harming innocents.

    It’s also worth noting that the opposite view — the distinctly authoritarian observation that it is better that a hundred innocent people suffer than for one guilty person to go free — was held by such luminaries as Prime Minister Bismark, Stalin, and Pol Pot. Pol Pot. Such august company!

  • MarkTemporis

    Repeating ‘Pol Pot’ twice triggered an earworm, so enjoy:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-KTsXHXMkJA

    (BTW, the man’s real name was Saloth Sar, which sounds like someone Conan would fight. On top of his other crimes, man had no taste at all — that is SUCH a cooler name than ‘Pol Pot’)

  • LoneWolf343

    King is actually a pretty smart cookie, if by virtue of just flinging spaghetti against the wall.

  • J_Enigma32

    Well, I sympathize with the point but being a pure pendant, “intelligence” is a bit of a weasel word without a true meaning. I would say that Hinn is a very intelligent man when it comes interpersonal and social intelligence, since he’s startlingly good at reading people. Hucksters have to be, otherwise they won’t be successful.

    Now, a moral man he most certainly is not, as you pointed out.

  • LoneWolf343

    I personally realized this when Sarah Palin climbed to national prominence. She’s a fucking moron, but she is still cunning, as evidenced by her governorship. It really makes sense if you think about it: there is a lot of interpersonal trust that makes a society works. People who are willing to abuse this trust can get ahead of their unsuspecting brethren.

  • Alix

    This reminds me of the one guy who ran (runs? IDK) a ministry – Demonbusters, iirc. Part of his thing was that things like paisley patterns were demonic.

    He was serious, as far as I could tell.

  • Michael Pullmann

    One wonders how he survived the ’70s.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Paisley patterns?

    Oh, my. :O

  • Alix

    I browsed his website once, way back in high school, while I was on an epic angelology/demonology research kick. I came away with the impression that in his eyes, almost everything is demon-possessed, and the only way to be free of demons is to live naked in a box.

    Except that that goes against God’s plan, and therefore the box is demon possessed. And possibly nakedness is too. XD

    Also, demons are the cause of bad weather, and so you can avert storms by casting them out like Jesus commanded.

    I just checked, and they appear to still be online. That site is much less of an eyesore than it used to be, which is saying something.

  • GDwarf

    Also, demons are the cause of bad weather, and so you can avert storms by casting them out like Jesus commanded.

    On the advice of commentators here I’m reading Religion and the Decline of Magic, which notes that this was a common belief…in the middle ages. Ringing church bells (and a few other ceremonies) were thought to chase away the demons and reduce the impact of storms.

    That is, perhaps, excusable at a time when most people’s grasp of meteorology was nil. In the modern day? Rather less so.

  • Matri

    That is, perhaps, excusable at a time when most people’s grasp of meteorology was nil. In the modern day? Rather less so.

    Why do you think they’re trying their hardest to get rid of education and science?

  • http://www.oliviareviews.com/ PepperjackCandy

    Also, demons are the cause of bad weather, and so you can avert storms by casting them out like Jesus commanded.

    We haven’t had a decent rain in months. What kind of evil rituals do I have to engage in to attract a storm?

  • VMink

    We had thunder and lightning in the Bay Area earlier this week. Though unusual, if it was demons, I’d have one thing to say to them: SLACKERS!

  • Alix

    You have to cast out the demon of drought.

    I’m not joking. >.>

  • Daniel

    “the only way to be free of demons is to live naked in a box.”
    David Blaine is not possessed?

  • http://mistformsquirrel.deviantart.com/ mistformsquirrel

    I knew my tie was possessed.

  • Redcrow

    What kind of knot it prefers to be arranged into? Might be important…

  • VMink

    There’s a joke somewhere in here about possessed paisley boxers…

  • MarkTemporis

    All ties are possessed. Demons of avarice and conformity would be my guess, except that the demon expert probably doesn’t see conformity as caused by demons.

    If I believed in demons I would; White Wolf had fomori (basically the same thing — possessed humans) called ‘Normalites’ which were one of the scariest things ever.

  • Jenny Islander

    I read once that paisley is really a highly stylized pattern of tamarind pods, which is culturally analogous to a cheerful apple print. Don’t know how accurate that is though.

  • Katie

    Mangos, but yes.

  • Isabel C.

    OMG, I remember that guy. We had a great time in college mocking him, especially the exorcism procedures, which involve “putting demons in THE BOX”. And then filling THE BOX with the blood of Jesus. And then boiling the blood. And then putting warrior angels into the box. (Being a warrior angel is just the worst gig ever in the guy’s universe.)

    Also, as a college gaming group, we found hilarious the assertion that people start playing D&D because of peer pressure. “Hey, Rickie, all the cool kids are behind the gym rolling D20s. C’mooooon, just make one half-elf fighter/thief. It’ll be fun! We’re not even playing first edition.”

    Dude may have a point about paisley, though. I mean: the seventies.

  • Daniel

    Well, Ian Paisley patterns maybe.

  • J_Enigma32

    Probably more than enough to recover the loss he paid for the crayons.

    He’s probably got his own sponsorship with Crayola.

    “I see your son picked Hellfire Red, which is next to Fire and Brimstone Black and Eternally Damned Teal. Since the crayon says ‘Mammon’ on the back, I can only conclude your son and I share the same inner demon. Have you ever thought about sending him to Liberty University for a degree in Theology?”

  • Abby Normal

    I think #2 ought to have a caveat–I count as a gen-Xer (born in 1977) and tanning beds were definitely considered “cool” among the preppy cheerleader types when I was in school (being able to go to a salon for that sort of thing carried a certain cache). It was the alternateens like myself that wouldn’t be caught dead in them (and got teased for being “pale”.)

  • The_L1985

    Tanning beds still produce an actual UV tan, though. You just don’t want to spend too long in them, or you get way too dark.

    Even then, though, it’s still better looking than that gods-awful spray-on stuff. Oompa-Loompas will never be cool.

  • Abby Normal

    Thing is, actual UV tans aren’t all that healthy either. Agreed on the spray tans, though.

    Maybe everybody ought to just do what they do and not waste so much money and time making themselves the perfect shade? What a radical concept! :)

  • The_L1985

    I feel that way, too. However, I did use tanning beds for a year (because my mother insisted I was way too pale and I figured a handful of 2-3 minute sessions on her dime wouldn’t hurt anything), and if you’re only using it to build up a base tan before heading to the tropics (like I was), it’s not actually so bad. Plus, if you didn’t have hours to spend building up a base tan, you will have NO resistance to the amount of sun you get in the tropics, even in winter. A sunburn is a lot worse for your skin than a tan.

    That’s the only reason I’d ever use a tanning bed, though, because I just don’t see the point. I am the color I am; just because I’m a bit paler than most other Italians doesn’t make me ugly or undesirable. (That, and I went through a goth phase. Nothing will make you stop seeing tans as necessary like temporarily idolizing vampire-level pallor.)

  • banancat

    Number 2 isn’t strictly correct. I used tanning beds in high school in the late 90s and early 00s during my “princess” phase. I don’t remember ever specifically hiding it or being embarrassed by it either.

  • http://www.aeryllou.tumblr.com/ Aeryl

    All my high school friends in the 90’s went to the “tanner’s”(as we called it) ALL THE TIME.

  • Baby_Raptor

    I want to get ahold of the doctor from #1, inform him that my favourite colour is clear and ask him what that says about my sexuality.

  • Daniel

    He’d see through that quickly enough and realise you’re transparently possessed, probably. Smacks a little of exhibitionism though, so it could be a perversion of some sort.

  • Jenny Islander

    This needs a signal boost:

    http://lydy.livejournal.com/76885.html

    The gist: Former recipient of food stamps, who almost starved to death before she got them, considers the motivations of the lawmakers who want to kill SNAP.

  • http://apocalypsereview.wordpress.com/ Invisible Neutrino

    Wheeeeeew. I just read that, and holy hard-hitting story, Batman :O

  • stardreamer42

    The “one day it will make sense to you” bullshit is a variety of fallacy that doesn’t seem to have been formally recognized. I call it ante hoc, ergo propter hoc — the belief that because everything happens for a reason, this horrible thing which has happened to you right now was CAUSED by some event slated to occur in your future, after which you will magically UNDERSTAND why you had to suffer the way you did. Stripped to its essential woo-woo, it’s obvious that it doesn’t make any sense at all.

  • http://anonsam.wordpress.com/ AnonymousSam

    Thank you! I’m sick of hearing it, especially from my parents. If the miracle hasn’t struck yet, don’t count on it happening in the next odd years. Especially when that miracle is deciding that Republicans were right all along.


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