nobody does bling…

… like the Catholic Church. Word.

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Photobucket
photo source: Rome of the West

About Katrina Fernandez

Mackerel Snapping Papist

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/17397215388001264080 Richard Truman Michael

    Like in Napoleon Dynamite:”I want that”LOL

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/13962838468417021831 Charlie

    Freakin’ awesome.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14823464458933233001 Dan Hunter

    Why arn’t those monstrances [monstrai?} being used in Exposition and Benediction in a church somewhere? ie:North Carolina

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06117353945124506952 The Crescat

    Dan, good point. All this stuff is on showcase in a museum. Nothing pisses me off more then going to a museum and seeing religious/church artifacts on display… especially Icons. Icons are not representations of the holy but physical presentations of the holy and belongs no where but a church.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/14823464458933233001 Dan Hunter

    Mrs Cannonball,Sho’nuff!!!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/08742831059018218047 YoungCatholicSTL

    Two things in response to Dan and Mrs. Cannonball:1. These items are not any ordinary museum. This is a museum on the campus of a Catholic University (SLU), and the items all come from the former Museum of the Western Jesuit Missions at the former St. Stanislaus Jesuit seminary. The items are not simply on display as items of art or history, but as a reflection of the efforts and preaching achievements of the first Jesuit missionaries west of the Mississippi River. This is a place to learn not just about history and beauty, but about the Faith itself.2. Most of these items have been out of use for over 50 years, some for over 100. Even before the Jesuits closed their seminary, with over 250 years of service in the STL area, the Jesuits had acquired many more items of religious use than they could ever use at the seminary or at the university. Further, these items are within a few hundred feet of a church and quite a few chapels. If the need ever arose, they could quickly be put back into use. Sure, I’d rather see these items in use, but the display that exists can hardly be said to constitute the type of display that should piss someone off.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06117353945124506952 The Crescat

    actually I was referring to being pissed off about icons in museums. I recall being very upset about seeing them displayed at the National Gallery in DC. as for the museum these are displayed in…Hmmm. I’m not suprised Jesuits had no use for them anymore. ;-P

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/09356738924839809045 Andrew

    Oh yeah!… Regarding items in museums, I share the same feelings. My parish started a museum a few years back (in the Lady Chapel of the Church proper!!!), and many items which should be used in the liturgy is now just sitting there. And the best part is, the museum has not been open for the past 2 years!…Items meant for liturgical use should be used. That’s why the people of ages past got them.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/06692448528819277158 Mark Scott Abeln

    Museums are one of those ideas invented during the Renaissance by bored Catholic churchmen who were more interested in worldly things rather than the faith, and was another reason why we had the Reformation.The Enlightenment loves museums: put something in a museum and then it is dead – no longer is a part of life, or a lively faith.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/02111042672936788662 Derik

    maybe thay will be safer from thieves in the museum


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