The Ham/Nye debate in 40 seconds

Didn’t get to watch last night’s two-and-half-hour debate between Ken Ham and Bill Nye? Don’t worry. Watch this and you’ve pretty much seen it all:

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  • http://www.wideopenground.com/ Lana

    His version of Christianity he means.

  • ChrisFinegan

    The thing that truly baffled me was Ham’s assertion that the existence of natural laws proved the existence of God but as soon as anyone attempts to apply those laws to history he claims that they are essentially null and void. He can’t have his cake and eat it!

    • http://patheos.com/blogs/unfundamentalistchristians/ Dan Wilkinson

      Where you there?

      • http://shadsie.deviantart.com/ Shadsie

        “When the universe was forged in the crucible of the Big Bang, our race was already 16 years old.” __ History of the Nibblonians, Futurama.

    • Shinjitsu

      Because man’s understanding of natural laws is, at best, minimal. There’s a reason why certain natural laws appear to break down at the quantum level.

      What’s more, our planet today is not the exact same one it was millions and millions of years ago so being dogmatic about how the world actually was then based solely on how the world is today is specious, even irrational.

      • ChrisFinegan

        Yes, our planet has changed.it’s changed in ways that can only be explained by millions, not thousands, of years of existence. I argue that stating the way the world was made based on only one source, whether literature, scientific or anything else, is both dogmatic and irrational.

      • Sven2547

        It’s not an article of faith or dogma to recognize that light moves at a constant speed*, or that Potassium-40 decays with a half-life of 1.248 billion years. What’s irrational is the assumption that these immutable natural laws changed wildly over the last few thousand years, with no evidence supporting that whatsoever.

        * in a vacuum

        • Shinjitsu

          Then explain why the laws of gravity break down at the quantum level. While you’re at it, prove that each and every single one of the natural laws discovered on Earth are equally applicable in every single location in the universe.

          • Sven2547

            Then explain why the laws of gravity break down at the quantum level.

            Not sure. We’re trying to find that out. But you don’t even need quantum physics to establish a reliable age of the Earth.

            While you’re at it, prove that each and every single one of the natural laws discovered on Earth are equally applicable in every single location in the universe.

            Everywhere we’ve tested it, it’s the same. Every TIME we’ve tested it, it’s the same. Until something happens to the contrary, it’s a completely reasonable presumption that constants are, in fact, constant.

            On the other hand, there is NO evidence that just a few thousand years ago, tectonic plates moved a million times as fast, radioactive decay was incredibly fast, and there were 40 seasons in a year. You are making a fallacious argument from ignorance: by claiming that there are some things science doesn’t know (like some of the finer points of quantum mechanics), you are implying that it’s perfectly okay to inject your superstition in its place.

            The God-of-the-gaps is not only a poor substitute for science, it’s also bad theology.

  • http://allegro63.wordpress.com/ allegro63

    Mr. Ham’s core statement, that being a Christian means there is no need to change one’s mind on something, even if there is clear evidence to the contrary, is one of the tragic aspects found in Christianity.

    To have one’s mind utterly set, made up, no take backs, means that you can’t learn, you can’t discover, you can’t see things from other perspectives, you can’t understand why others view things, the concept of awe, surprise and wonder are impossible, as well as any thought of being in error. Even sadder, is that the person with that very made up mind, prefers it that way.

    • Shinjitsu

      “By all means let’s be open-minded, but not so open-minded that our brains drop out.” – Richard Dawkins

  • http://rolltodisbelieve.wordpress.com/ Captain Cassidy

    Best comment I’ve heard so far about it: “Ken Ham spent most of his time bolstering his argument from ignorance with an argument from authority.” (ETA: Real life comment, so no link 😉 )

    • adam

      Actually he spent the whole time raising MONEY…..

      Building Amusement Parks is expensive.