This Is His Work, Why Am I Making It Mine?

This Is His Work, Why Am I Making It Mine? February 8, 2019

I remember one point during the early days of GFA when I was traveling full-time for the ministry, and the strain was taking a heavy toll both on my family and on me. I was starting to burn out; I almost hated the work.

Two factors were wearing me down:

  1. I felt like a beggar.
    It is hard on the flesh to be traveling and asking for money day after day and night after night. It was almost becoming a sales operation for me, and I stopped feeling good about myself.
  2. I was discouraged by the poor response—especially from churches and pastors.
    Many days I called on people for hours to get only one or two new sponsors. Pastors and mission committees listened to me and promised to call back, but I never heard from them again. It always seemed as though I was competing against the building fund, new carpets for the fellowship hall or next Saturday night’s Jesus rock concert.

This Is His Work, Why Am I Making It Mine? - KP Yohannan - Gospel for Asia

Despite the solemn message of death, suffering and need I was presenting, people still left the meetings with laughter and gossip on their lips. I was offended at the spirit of jocularity in the worship places; it wounded me.

So many times they went out to eat after I had just shared the tragedy of the thousands starving to death daily or the millions of homeless people living on the streets of Asia. Because of this, I was becoming angry and judgmental. As I felt uglier and uglier inside, depression settled in.

In the Depths of My Distress

Early in 1981—while driving alone between meetings in a rented car near Greensboro, North Carolina—all the dark feelings of psychological burnout crept over me. I had a full-fledged pity party, feeling sorry for myself and the hard life I was leading.

Then with a start, I began to tremble with fear. Suddenly I felt the presence of someone else. I realized that the Spirit of the Lord was speaking.

“I am not in any trouble,” He chided, “that I need someone to beg for Me or help Me out. I made no promises that I will not keep. It is not the largeness of the work that matters, but only doing what I command. All I ask of you is that you be a servant. For all who join with you in the work, it will be a privilege—a light burden for them.”

The words echoed in my mind. 

  • This is His work, I told myself. Why am I making it mine? 
  • The burden is light. Why am I making it heavy? 
  • The work is a privilege. Why am I making it a chore?

Freedom from My Burden

I instantly repented of my sinful attitudes. 

God was sharing His work with me, and He was speaking of others who would join me. Although I still was doing the work alone, it was exciting to think others would be joining with me and that they too would find the burden to be light. From that moment until now, I have not been overpowered by the burden of heading GFA.

I find building this mission an exciting, joyful job. Even my preaching has changed. My posture is different. Today the pressure is gone. No longer do I feel I have to beg audiences or make them feel guilty.

Because the work of GFA—and the whole indigenous missionary movement—is initiated by God, it does not need the worries and guidance of man. 

  • Whether our goal is to support 10 thousand or 10 million workers, 
  • Whether it is working in 10 states or 100,
  • Whether I must supervise a staff of 5 or 500,

I still can approach this work without stress. For this is His work, and our burden is easy.

Give It Back
Do you find yourself discouraged in what God has called you to do? Remember today that it is God’s work that He will accomplish. Thank Him for the privilege of working alongside Him in this mission and have faith that He will provide all that you need.

Dr. KP Yohannan, founder and director of Gospel for Asia, has written more than 200 books, including Revolution in World Missions, an international bestseller with more than 4 million copies in print. He and his wife, Gisela, have two grown children, Daniel and Sarah, who both serve the Lord with their families.

Gospel for Asia has been serving the “least of these” in Asia since its beginning in 1979, often in places where no one else is serving. GFA supports national workers who are serving as the hands and feet of Christ by ministering to people’s needs so they can understand the love of God for them for the first time. GFA is engaged in dozens of projects, such as caring for poor children, slum dwellers and widows and orphans; providing clean water by funding wells; supporting medical missions; and meeting the needs of those in leprosy colonies. Through GFA’s Bridge of Hope Program, tens of thousands of children are being rescued from the generational curses of poverty and hopelessness.

Click here, to read more articles on Patheos by Dr. KP Yohannan Metropolitan.

Go here to know more about Dr. KP Yohannan: Integrity | Facebook | Twitter | Book | OnePlace

Sometimes a poem says it best. Read Dr. KP Yohannan Metropolitan’s poem about being carried by the Lord. 

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What Are Your Thoughts?leave a comment
  • Jepasingh

    The motto for begging is being trembled by the leaders iñ Chennai diocese. I beg you please meet and talk privately with the missionaries in Chennai diocese

  • Cherokee Strip

    There is a passage in 2 Corinthians 12:9-10 that comes into mind – “For when I am weak, then I am strong.”

    Paul famously quoted, he did what he hated and hated what he did. All of us arise each day with repeated sins. Whether it be losing our patience or a losing battle with addiction, some cycles of thought, habit, and sin that are too big to cease on our own strength. Through those areas of helplessness, we find the very freedom in Christ that leads to strength and joy.

    Joy in Christ isn’t a giddy feeling of cracking up at a joke or a triumphant banner of victory when we accomplish a goal or soar ahead in an area of struggle. Joy is there in those moments, but true joy stems from the unwavering strength of the Lord. It remains to remind us how far we have come and encourages us throughout the long road of refinement we have yet to travel. The hope of salvation in Christ is rooted in what has already been done. “It is finished.”