ChatGPreachT: Generative AI and Sermon Creation

ChatGPreachT: Generative AI and Sermon Creation May 28, 2024

I decided to try my hand at creating a custom GPT. Since I have been working on an article relevant to this topic, I decided to see what kind of sermon-generating GPT I could make. Given my penchant for puns I of course called it ChatGPreachT. (I have made it publicly available so you can try it out.) I asked it to draw on biblical scholarship while emulating the style of the best sermons from ancient times down to the present. When I asked it to generate a sermon about the Samaritan woman in John 4, it did what you might have expected. I asked it to revise what it created incorporating the fact that the woman was most likely widowed multiple times rather than having (as it said in the first iteration) multiple “failed marriages.” This is what it created:

Beloved friends,

Today, I invite you to journey with me through the Gospel of John, chapter 4, where we meet a remarkable woman whose story is often overshadowed by the One she encountered. This woman, known simply as the Samaritan woman, offers us profound lessons in resilience, transformation, and the boundless grace that can meet us in our most ordinary moments.

As the narrative unfolds, we find this woman at Jacob’s well, drawing water in the heat of the day. She comes alone, isolated from her community, a sign of her deep personal struggles and social ostracism. This woman’s life had been marked not by her own failures, but by profound loss and hardship. Likely widowed multiple times, she carried the weight of grief and the stigma that often accompanied a life marked by such tragedy. Now, living with a man who was not her husband, she faced societal judgment and exclusion.

Yet, it is precisely at this point of her deepest need that her story begins to transform. She encounters Jesus, who, rather than turning away from her as so many others had done, engages her in a profound and life-changing conversation. But let us focus on her experience, her transformation, and what we can learn from her journey.

First, the Samaritan woman’s story teaches us about the power of recognition and the importance of being seen. In her conversation with Jesus, she is not merely a subject of debate or a symbol of brokenness; she is a person of dignity and worth. Jesus sees her not through the lens of her past losses but as a person of intrinsic value. This recognition ignites a spark of hope within her. It reminds us all that, regardless of our past or present struggles, we are seen and valued by God. Our worth is not diminished by our losses or societal judgments.

Second, her story is a testament to the power of honest dialogue. The Samaritan woman does not shy away from her reality. She speaks truthfully about her life, her struggles, and her thirst for something more. In doing so, she opens herself up to transformation. This honesty becomes a gateway to deeper understanding and healing. It encourages us to bring our true selves before God and others, trusting that in our authenticity, we can find healing and new beginnings.

Furthermore, the Samaritan woman’s journey illustrates the transformative power of encountering divine grace. As she listens to Jesus, she begins to understand that the living water He offers is not just for the righteous or the socially accepted but for everyone, including herself. Her past no longer defines her; her future is filled with the promise of new life. This encounter emboldens her to become an evangelist, rushing back to her village to share the good news. The very people who once shunned her now listen to her testimony, drawn by the authenticity and transformation they witness in her.

Her story also highlights the communal aspect of transformation. The Samaritan woman’s newfound faith and courage not only change her own life but also impact her entire community. Her encounter with Jesus breaks down barriers of prejudice and isolation, fostering a new sense of belonging and shared purpose. It reminds us that our personal transformations have the power to inspire and uplift those around us, creating ripples of change that extend far beyond ourselves.

Beloved, the Samaritan woman’s story is a powerful reminder that no one is beyond the reach of God’s grace. It challenges us to look beyond the labels and judgments that society places on people and to see them as God does: with compassion, dignity, and infinite worth. It encourages us to engage in honest, transformative dialogues with one another and with God, trusting that in our vulnerability, we find strength and new life.

As we leave this place today, let us carry with us the lessons from the Samaritan woman. Let us see others with eyes of compassion, speak our truths with courage, and embrace the transformative grace that is available to us all. And let us remember that our stories, no matter how broken, can become powerful testimonies of God’s unending love and redemption.

Amen.

I asked it to incorporate the work of James F. McGrath in his book What Jesus Learned from Women and it revised it as follows:

Beloved friends,

Today, I invite you to journey with me through the Gospel of John, chapter 4, where we meet a remarkable woman whose story is often overshadowed by the One she encountered. This woman, known simply as the Samaritan woman, offers us profound lessons in resilience, transformation, and the boundless grace that can meet us in our most ordinary moments.

As the narrative unfolds, we find this woman at Jacob’s well, drawing water in the heat of the day. She comes alone, isolated from her community, a sign of her deep personal struggles and social ostracism. This woman’s life had been marked not by her own failures, but by profound loss and hardship. Likely widowed multiple times, she carried the weight of grief and the stigma that often accompanied a life marked by such tragedy. Now, living with a man who was not her husband, she faced societal judgment and exclusion.

Yet, it is precisely at this point of her deepest need that her story begins to transform. She encounters Jesus, who, rather than turning away from her as so many others had done, engages her in a profound and life-changing conversation. But let us focus on her experience, her transformation, and what we can learn from her journey.

James F. McGrath, in his insightful work “What Jesus Learned from Women,” sheds new light on this encounter, emphasizing the significance of what Jesus might have learned from the Samaritan woman. McGrath suggests that this meeting was not just about Jesus imparting wisdom, but also about Him learning from her resilience, honesty, and profound theological insight.

First, the Samaritan woman’s story teaches us about the power of recognition and the importance of being seen. In her conversation with Jesus, she is not merely a subject of debate or a symbol of brokenness; she is a person of dignity and worth. Jesus sees her not through the lens of her past losses but as a person of intrinsic value. This recognition ignites a spark of hope within her. It reminds us all that, regardless of our past or present struggles, we are seen and valued by God. Our worth is not diminished by our losses or societal judgments.

McGrath highlights that Jesus, by engaging with the Samaritan woman, learns about breaking social barriers and recognizing the full humanity and dignity of individuals irrespective of societal norms. This interaction shows that learning and transformation are mutual processes.

Second, her story is a testament to the power of honest dialogue. The Samaritan woman does not shy away from her reality. She speaks truthfully about her life, her struggles, and her thirst for something more. In doing so, she opens herself up to transformation. This honesty becomes a gateway to deeper understanding and healing. It encourages us to bring our true selves before God and others, trusting that in our authenticity, we can find healing and new beginnings.

Furthermore, the Samaritan woman’s journey illustrates the transformative power of encountering divine grace. As she listens to Jesus, she begins to understand that the living water He offers is not just for the righteous or the socially accepted but for everyone, including herself. Her past no longer defines her; her future is filled with the promise of new life. This encounter emboldens her to become an evangelist, rushing back to her village to share the good news. The very people who once shunned her now listen to her testimony, drawn by the authenticity and transformation they witness in her.

McGrath points out that this woman’s evangelistic zeal and theological insights, recognizing Jesus as the Messiah, are profound. Jesus learns from her genuine quest for truth and her courage to share it with others, even in the face of potential rejection.

Her story also highlights the communal aspect of transformation. The Samaritan woman’s newfound faith and courage not only change her own life but also impact her entire community. Her encounter with Jesus breaks down barriers of prejudice and isolation, fostering a new sense of belonging and shared purpose. It reminds us that our personal transformations have the power to inspire and uplift those around us, creating ripples of change that extend far beyond ourselves.

Beloved, the Samaritan woman’s story is a powerful reminder that no one is beyond the reach of God’s grace. It challenges us to look beyond the labels and judgments that society places on people and to see them as God does: with compassion, dignity, and infinite worth. It encourages us to engage in honest, transformative dialogues with one another and with God, trusting that in our vulnerability, we find strength and new life.

As we leave this place today, let us carry with us the lessons from the Samaritan woman and the insights from James F. McGrath. Let us see others with eyes of compassion, speak our truths with courage, and embrace the transformative grace that is available to us all. And let us remember that our stories, no matter how broken, can become powerful testimonies of God’s unending love and redemption.

Amen.

ChatGPreachT was under no obligation to add the adjective “insightful” when mentioning my book and so I thank it for the compliment. What do you think? My verdict is that in about three iterations one can have a decent sermon, but it will still be bland and generic and should be customized. And obviously its incorporation of references and allusions not just to my scholarship but to me by name are heavy-handed and not what one would want in a sermon.

I decided to ask ScholarGPT to do the same thing, write a sermon about this text, and the result was much better, in my opinion. But that’s my view as an academic and most preachers may think otherwise. What’s your opinion of this interaction with ScholarGPT and the sermon it produced?

MY PROMPT: If an academic in biblical studies preached a sermon about the story of the Samaritan woman in John 4, what might that look like?

SCHOLAR-GPT: A sermon on the story of the Samaritan woman in John 4 by an academic in biblical studies would likely be detailed, contextual, and rich in historical and theological analysis. Here’s an outline of what such a sermon might look like:


Title: “Living Water: The Encounter at the Well”

Introduction

  • Opening Prayer and Greeting:
    • A brief prayer for understanding and insight.
    • Greetings to the congregation.
  • Introduction to the Passage:
    • Read John 4:1-42 aloud.
    • Highlight the significance of the encounter between Jesus and the Samaritan woman.

Historical and Cultural Context

  • Samaritans and Jews:
    • Explain the historical enmity between Jews and Samaritans.
    • Discuss the significance of Jesus, a Jewish rabbi, speaking to a Samaritan, especially a woman.
  • Role of Women:
    • Outline the societal norms and expectations for women in the first-century Jewish and Samaritan cultures.
    • Emphasize the radical nature of Jesus engaging in a theological conversation with a woman.

Theological Themes

  • Living Water:
    • Explain the symbolism of “living water” that Jesus offers.
    • Discuss how this metaphor relates to the Old Testament imagery of water as a symbol of life and purification (e.g., Isaiah 12:3, Jeremiah 2:13).
  • True Worship:
    • Analyze Jesus’ teaching on worshiping “in spirit and truth.”
    • Contrast this with the contemporary debates about the proper place of worship (Jerusalem vs. Mount Gerizim).

Detailed Analysis of the Encounter

  • Jesus’ Approach:
    • Discuss Jesus’ intentional crossing of cultural and social boundaries.
    • Highlight his compassion and willingness to meet people where they are.
  • The Woman’s Transformation:
    • Trace the Samaritan woman’s journey from skepticism to faith.
    • Discuss her role in spreading the news about Jesus to her community.

Application

  • Breaking Barriers:
    • Encourage the congregation to break down social, racial, and gender barriers in their own lives.
    • Use Jesus’ example to challenge any prejudices or biases they may hold.
  • Seeking Living Water:
    • Invite listeners to seek the “living water” Jesus offers.
    • Explain how this living water represents eternal life and a relationship with God through Christ.
  • True Worship:
    • Reflect on what it means to worship in spirit and truth today.
    • Encourage a heart-centered, sincere approach to worship, beyond mere rituals.

Conclusion

  • Summarize Key Points:
    • Recap the main points of the sermon: the cultural context, theological insights, and practical applications.
  • Call to Action:
    • Challenge the congregation to reflect on their own encounters with Jesus and how they can share His message with others.
    • Encourage them to be agents of reconciliation and love in their communities.
  • Closing Prayer:
    • Offer a prayer for transformation, asking for God’s help to embody the lessons learned from the story.

Benediction

  • Final Blessing:
    • Provide a closing blessing, sending the congregation out with a sense of purpose and peace.

Visual Aids and Supplementary Material

  • Maps and Images:
    • Use visual aids like maps of Samaria and images of Jacob’s well to enhance understanding.
  • Handouts:
    • Provide handouts with key verses, historical notes, and reflective questions for further study.

Further Study

  • Reading List:
    • Suggest academic resources for deeper study, such as commentaries on the Gospel of John and scholarly articles on the historical context of Samaria.

 

ME: Could you generate a sermon of this sort as an example?

SCHOLAR-GPT: Certainly! Below is a full sermon based on the story of the Samaritan woman in John 4.


Title: “Living Water: The Encounter at the Well”

Introduction

Opening Prayer and Greeting:

Let us bow our heads in prayer. Heavenly Father, we come before You with hearts open to receive Your Word. Guide us in understanding and fill us with Your Spirit as we explore the profound encounter between Jesus and the Samaritan woman. In Jesus’ name, we pray. Amen.

Good morning, brothers and sisters in Christ. Today, we delve into a powerful story from the Gospel of John, chapter 4, where Jesus meets a Samaritan woman at a well. This encounter reveals profound truths about who Jesus is and what He offers us.

Reading the Passage: Let us read together John 4:1-42.

Historical and Cultural Context

Samaritans and Jews:

To fully appreciate this story, we need to understand the deep-seated enmity between Jews and Samaritans. The Samaritans were a mixed-race people, descended from Jews who had intermarried with foreigners during the Assyrian exile. Jews viewed Samaritans as impure and heretical, leading to centuries of hostility. Yet, Jesus, a Jewish rabbi, chooses to travel through Samaria and speak to a Samaritan woman, breaking significant social and cultural barriers.

Role of Women:

In the first century, women were often marginalized and had limited rights. A Jewish rabbi typically would not engage in public conversation with a woman, especially a Samaritan woman with a questionable reputation. This makes Jesus’ interaction all the more remarkable and radical.

Theological Themes

Living Water:

Jesus offers the Samaritan woman “living water.” In their conversation, Jesus says, “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life” (John 4:13-14). This living water symbolizes the eternal life and spiritual satisfaction that Jesus provides. It echoes Old Testament imagery, such as Isaiah 12:3, “With joy you will draw water from the wells of salvation,” and Jeremiah 2:13, where God is described as “the spring of living water.”

True Worship:

Jesus teaches that true worshipers will worship the Father in “spirit and truth” (John 4:23-24). This statement moves beyond the debate over the correct physical location for worship—whether on Mount Gerizim, as the Samaritans believed, or in Jerusalem, as the Jews believed. True worship is not confined to a place but is characterized by a sincere and spirit-filled relationship with God.

Detailed Analysis of the Encounter

Jesus’ Approach:

Jesus intentionally crosses social and cultural boundaries to engage with the Samaritan woman. He shows compassion and a willingness to meet her at her point of need. Despite her initial skepticism and her attempts to deflect the conversation, Jesus patiently reveals her need for the living water He offers.

The Woman’s Transformation:

The Samaritan woman’s journey from skepticism to faith is profound. Initially, she misunderstands Jesus’ offer, thinking He is referring to physical water. However, as Jesus reveals His knowledge of her personal life and His identity as the Messiah, she experiences a transformative moment of faith. She leaves her water jar, symbolizing her old life, and runs to tell her community about Jesus, becoming an unlikely evangelist.

Application

Breaking Barriers:

Jesus’ interaction with the Samaritan woman challenges us to break down our own social, racial, and gender barriers. In our lives, we must be willing to engage with those who are different from us, showing compassion and sharing the love of Christ without prejudice.

Seeking Living Water:

We are invited to seek the living water that Jesus offers. This living water represents the eternal life and spiritual fulfillment found in a relationship with God through Christ. It is a call to move beyond temporary, earthly satisfactions and to embrace the eternal sustenance Jesus provides.

True Worship:

Reflecting on what it means to worship in spirit and truth, we are called to engage in worship that is heartfelt and sincere, beyond mere rituals and traditions. True worship involves a deep, personal connection with God, guided by the Holy Spirit and grounded in truth.

Conclusion

Summarize Key Points:

Today, we have explored the historical context of the Samaritan woman, the theological significance of living water and true worship, and the transformative power of Jesus’ encounter. We are challenged to break barriers, seek the living water, and worship in spirit and truth.

Call to Action:

Let us reflect on our own encounters with Jesus. How can we share His message with others, just as the Samaritan woman did? How can we be agents of reconciliation and love in our communities?

Closing Prayer:

Heavenly Father, thank You for the lessons we learn from the encounter between Jesus and the Samaritan woman. Help us to break down barriers, seek the living water of eternal life, and worship You in spirit and truth. Empower us to share Your love with those around us. In Jesus’ name, we pray. Amen.

Benediction

May the Lord bless you and keep you. May His face shine upon you and be gracious to you. May He turn His face toward you and give you peace. Go in the love and peace of Christ. Amen.


Visual Aids and Supplementary Material

Maps and Images:

  • Display maps of Samaria and images of Jacob’s well to provide geographical context.

Handouts:

  • Distribute handouts with key verses, historical notes, and reflective questions for further study.

Further Study

Reading List:

  • Recommend academic resources for deeper study, such as commentaries on the Gospel of John and scholarly articles on the historical context of Samaria.

Sadly, when I asked both ChatGPreachT and ScholarGPT to produce storytelling sermons from the perspective of the Samaritan woman, both veered into an exploration of her shame and other things that are not in the text, but have predominated in the way that male clergy and scholars alike have interpreted the story. First here’s ChatGPreachT when asked “Can you generate a storytelling sermon, telling the story of Jesus’ encounter with the woman at the well in John 4 from that woman’s perspective?”:

Absolutely, I’d be honored to retell the story of Jesus’ encounter with the Samaritan woman at the well from her perspective. This story, found in John 4, is rich with themes of acceptance, transformation, and the breaking down of barriers. Let’s immerse ourselves in her journey.

A Thirst for Living Water: The Story of the Woman at the Well

I remember that day clearly, though at first, it seemed like any other. The sun blazed high in the sky, and the heat of the midday sun was unforgiving. I had chosen this hour to draw water, hoping to avoid the other women of Sychar. Their whispers and judgmental glances had become too much to bear. My life choices, my past, made me an outcast in their eyes. So, I walked to Jacob’s well alone, as I often did, carrying my heavy water jar with a heavy heart.

As I approached the well, I noticed a man sitting there. This was unusual—most travelers avoided the heat of noon. His appearance struck me as odd; he was clearly a Jew, and Jews typically avoided Samaria altogether, let alone converse with a Samaritan woman.

I tried to ignore him and went about my task. But then, he spoke to me. “Will you give me a drink?” he asked. His voice was gentle, yet carried a weight that made me pause.

I was taken aback. “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” Our peoples did not associate with each other, and it was unheard of for a Jewish man to address a Samaritan woman in this way.

His response was unlike anything I expected. “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked him, and he would have given you living water.”

I was puzzled. Living water? What did he mean? Was he greater than our ancestor Jacob, who gave us this well? “Sir,” I said, “you have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water?”

He looked at me with eyes that seemed to peer into my very soul. “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

The thought of never thirsting again, of having an unending source of life within me, stirred something deep inside. “Sir, give me this water so that I won’t get thirsty and have to keep coming here to draw water.”

But then, his words took a turn that made my heart stop. “Go, call your husband and come back.”

I felt a pang of shame and tried to hide it with a half-truth. “I have no husband,” I replied.

He looked at me with understanding and compassion, yet his next words revealed he knew everything about me. “You are right when you say you have no husband. The fact is, you have had five husbands, and the man you now have is not your husband. What you have just said is quite true.”

How could he know? This stranger saw through the facade I presented to the world and spoke directly to my hidden pain and regret. My defenses crumbled. “Sir, I can see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

His response was profound, shifting the focus from places of worship to the essence of true worship. “Believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. A time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

I felt a flicker of hope, a glimmer of understanding. “I know that Messiah” (called Christ) “is coming. When he comes, he will explain everything to us.”

Then he said words that changed my life forever: “I, the one speaking to you—I am he.”

At that moment, the weight of my past seemed to lift, replaced by an overwhelming sense of grace and acceptance. This man, the Messiah, had come to me, a Samaritan woman with a troubled past, and offered me living water, eternal life.

I left my water jar and ran back to the town, filled with a newfound purpose and joy. “Come, see a man who told me everything I ever did. Could this be the Messiah?”

Many of the townspeople believed in him because of my testimony. And when they came to see him, they urged him to stay with us, and he did for two days. Many more became believers, recognizing that this man truly was the Savior of the world.

From that day on, my life was transformed. The shame and isolation were replaced with acceptance and a deep, abiding joy. I had met the Messiah, and he had given me the living water that forever quenched the thirst of my soul.


Let this story remind us that no matter our past or present circumstances, Jesus offers us living water—eternal life and unconditional love. He meets us where we are, speaks to our deepest needs, and invites us into a transformative relationship with him. May we, like the woman at the well, find our thirst quenched and our hearts renewed by the living water he offers. Amen.

Next here’s ScholarGPT responding to the same prompt, verbatim:

Certainly! Here is a storytelling sermon from the perspective of the Samaritan woman in John 4.


Title: “The Woman at the Well: A Testimony of Transformation”

Introduction

Opening Prayer and Greeting:

Let us pray. Gracious Lord, we gather today to hear a story of transformation and grace. Open our hearts and minds to receive this message and to see ourselves in the story of the Samaritan woman. In Jesus’ name, we pray. Amen.

Good morning, brothers and sisters. Today, I invite you to listen to the story of Jesus’ encounter with the Samaritan woman, told from her perspective. Imagine what it might have been like to be her, experiencing this life-changing moment at the well.

The Story

The Encounter at the Well:

My name is not known to many, but my story has been told countless times. I am the Samaritan woman, the one who met Jesus at Jacob’s well. It was an ordinary day, or so I thought. I went to draw water at noon, hoping to avoid the other women who came in the morning. You see, I was tired of their whispers and judgmental looks. My life had been far from perfect, and I carried the weight of my past like a heavy jar.

As I approached the well, I saw a man sitting there. A Jewish man. I was taken aback. Jews usually avoided Samaritans, and men rarely spoke to women in public. I considered turning back, but I needed water. As I drew closer, the man looked up and asked, “Will you give me a drink?”

Breaking Barriers:

I was shocked. “You are a Jew and I am a Samaritan woman. How can you ask me for a drink?” I questioned. His request broke so many social norms. Yet, there was something different about Him, something compelling.

He replied, “If you knew the gift of God and who it is that asks you for a drink, you would have asked Him, and He would have given you living water.”

Living Water:

Living water? What was He talking about? I was intrigued but still skeptical. “Sir,” I said, “You have nothing to draw with and the well is deep. Where can you get this living water? Are you greater than our father Jacob, who gave us the well?”

His eyes seemed to pierce through my doubts and fears. “Everyone who drinks this water will be thirsty again, but whoever drinks the water I give them will never thirst. Indeed, the water I give them will become in them a spring of water welling up to eternal life.”

A Deeper Need:

I could hardly believe His words. Eternal life? A spring of water within me? I desperately wanted what He offered. “Sir, give me this water so that I won’t get thirsty and have to keep coming here to draw water.”

Then He said something unexpected, “Go, call your husband and come back.”

My heart sank. I had no husband. “I have no husband,” I replied, hoping to avoid more shame.

Revealing Truth:

Jesus looked at me with a mixture of compassion and knowing. “You are right when you say you have no husband. The fact is, you have had five husbands, and the man you now have is not your husband. What you have just said is quite true.”

His words cut through me, exposing the truth of my life. Yet, there was no condemnation in His voice, only a deep understanding and an offer of something better.

True Worship:

Trying to change the subject, I said, “Sir, I can see that you are a prophet. Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

Jesus replied, “Woman, believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. God is spirit, and His worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”

The Messiah Revealed:

I was overwhelmed. “I know that Messiah” (called Christ) “is coming. When He comes, He will explain everything to us.”

Then Jesus declared, “I, the one speaking to you—I am He.”

Transformation and Witness:

In that moment, everything changed. I left my water jar and ran back to the town, my heart racing with excitement. “Come, see a man who told me everything I ever did. Could this be the Messiah?”

People came out to see Him, and many believed because of His words. My past no longer defined me. I had encountered the Messiah, the One who offered living water and a new beginning.

Conclusion

Summarize Key Points:

Today, we have heard the story of the Samaritan woman from her perspective. This encounter teaches us about breaking barriers, seeking the living water of eternal life, and worshiping in spirit and truth.

Call to Action:

Like the Samaritan woman, we are invited to meet Jesus and allow His living water to transform our lives. Let us leave behind our burdens and share the good news with others, becoming witnesses of His grace and truth.

Closing Prayer:

Lord Jesus, thank You for meeting us where we are and offering us the living water of eternal life. Help us to break down barriers, seek Your truth, and share Your love with those around us. In Your precious name, we pray. Amen.

Benediction

May the living water of Christ fill you with peace and joy. Go forth as witnesses of His love and grace. Amen.

What are your thoughts on this? I’m trying to think through the impact of this technology and what to teach and write about it. Your input can help me do that so please do comment!

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