In Case You’re Feeling Down and Depressed…

…about the whole government-hates-us thing — or in case you’re depressed about anything, really — I have something for you. This is American Protestant preaching at its best:

YouTube Preview Image

Let us never forget that our Lord goes before us, winning our battles.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_KDQFQTMD56CJAKMLXRFYUDNCPQ Montague

    Yes

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_KDQFQTMD56CJAKMLXRFYUDNCPQ Montague

    Yes

  • Anonymous

    Thanks for this post! It’s very inspiring. I sometimes find your posts mean-spirited, but feel so much love when I read one like this.

  • Anonymous

    This video is so well-done.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=628549313 Katie VandeVoorde

    AMEN! He is my King!

  • grace

    Yes, yes! So beautiful! His kingdom is here, today!

    We forget sometimes that Christ Jesus is real and living — he’s not just an “idea”. From that day to this, He is with us. Emmanuel!

  • Lorrie

    Thank you. I have to admit I have been feeling assaulted as everything I hold true and sacred is being attacked, and depression was rearing it’s ugly head. But now I remember, I am not fighting for a victory but rather FROM a victory.

  • Lorrie

    Thank you. I have to admit I have been feeling assaulted as everything I hold true and sacred is being attacked, and depression was rearing it’s ugly head. But now I remember, I am not fighting for a victory but rather FROM a victory.

  • Jay E.

    Christus vincit! Christus regnat! Christus imperat!

  • Casimir Pulaski

    Okay. I only have to say it is good, but certainly not the best Protestant preaching that I ever heard. I was raised Catholic, but for the last twenty two years I went to a Presbyterian church. This kind of preaching will get you on your feet and pump you up, but that in itself is insufficient. It taps into a basic human need to be roused up, but it doesn’t teach you how to live. I returned to the Catholic church back in September and it has been a difficult challenge to go from an hour long sermon that painstakingly picked part a sin issue and helped you learn how to deal with it or guard your heart from it to 12 to 14 minute homily. I can begin to see why so many Catholics have so little regard for regular attendance. Short homilies and little or no activities that help parishioners become part of one another’s lives. I guess hundreds of years ago when everyone in the local village, small town or neighborhood knew each other and had daily dealings with one another, it would be thought unnecessary to have Sunday luncheons and do things together. Nowadays people have a such a small sense of community with people they go to church with, I am not sure how to turn the tide. My guess is that it starts small. At my old Presbyterian church we did more than give a sign of peace or shake hands. We hugged and kissed each other on the cheek. Women kissing women’s cheeks and men kissing men’s cheeks. After church we all ate together. I wonder if this possible to take these two activities and introduce them to a Catholic church. And of yeah, we could learn to sit down for a whole thirty minute sermon. That would be wonderful.

    P.S. I hope you didn’t find this too much of a rant. Just feeling like a cold Catholic. That is saying a lot coming from a former frozen chosen.

  • Casimir Pulaski

    Okay. I only have to say it is good, but certainly not the best Protestant preaching that I ever heard. I was raised Catholic, but for the last twenty two years I went to a Presbyterian church. This kind of preaching will get you on your feet and pump you up, but that in itself is insufficient. It taps into a basic human need to be roused up, but it doesn’t teach you how to live. I returned to the Catholic church back in September and it has been a difficult challenge to go from an hour long sermon that painstakingly picked part a sin issue and helped you learn how to deal with it or guard your heart from it to 12 to 14 minute homily. I can begin to see why so many Catholics have so little regard for regular attendance. Short homilies and little or no activities that help parishioners become part of one another’s lives. I guess hundreds of years ago when everyone in the local village, small town or neighborhood knew each other and had daily dealings with one another, it would be thought unnecessary to have Sunday luncheons and do things together. Nowadays people have a such a small sense of community with people they go to church with, I am not sure how to turn the tide. My guess is that it starts small. At my old Presbyterian church we did more than give a sign of peace or shake hands. We hugged and kissed each other on the cheek. Women kissing women’s cheeks and men kissing men’s cheeks. After church we all ate together. I wonder if this possible to take these two activities and introduce them to a Catholic church. And of yeah, we could learn to sit down for a whole thirty minute sermon. That would be wonderful.

    P.S. I hope you didn’t find this too much of a rant. Just feeling like a cold Catholic. That is saying a lot coming from a former frozen chosen.

    • Tally Marx

      Well, you can’t add those activities to the Mass. But if you get people to stick around long enough afterwards (by making the teens cook and serve pancakes!) you can definitely help develop a greate sense of community. We have inter-generational faith formation at our parish (it’s done wonders–you must ask your pastor/bishop about it), couple’s meetings, a youth group, workshops and talks, retreats. It has been very active for the last two years, while remaining very traditional. It’s wonderful. If you want your parish to be more active… start something. Just one thing. We began with pancakes, and it grew so fast it was unbelievable.

    • AttentionDeficitCatholic

      Basically, what Tally said. I find it so sad that there are so many Catholic parishes that have such a little sense of community. At my home parish, we are a lot more communal, thanks to the guidance of our new pastor, with each member and each group within the parish interacting with another in some way at any time, from the Knights of Columbus serving pancake breakfasts to the rest of the parish, to the high school youth group doing tutoring for the school, to parish-wide events like Living Stations of the Cross. If you are bothered by a lack of community in your parish (as you should be), do what you can to improve the community of your parish. Who knows, maybe you will find some like-minded individuals who want to help you with it.

      As to the concept of moving “from an hour long sermon that painstakingly picked part a sin issue and helped you learn how to deal with it or guard your heart from it to 12 to 14 minute homily,” I find that sad as well. Unfortunately, there is not too much that a lay parishioner can do about that (you know, since it’s the priest’s job to give the homily), but you can at least make the suggestion to your priest, let him know that you are interested in longer homilies. My parish is very blessed to have strong, wise, holy priests who give excellent half-hour homilies which say so very, very much, and do more than just tell: they challenge. I will try not to take them for granted.

      And if you are ever discouraged by this state of affairs, just remember: however wonderful and insightful orators a Protestant service may have, only the Catholic Mass has the True Presence of the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ the King.

    • AttentionDeficitCatholic

      Basically, what Tally said. I find it so sad that there are so many Catholic parishes that have such a little sense of community. At my home parish, we are a lot more communal, thanks to the guidance of our new pastor, with each member and each group within the parish interacting with another in some way at any time, from the Knights of Columbus serving pancake breakfasts to the rest of the parish, to the high school youth group doing tutoring for the school, to parish-wide events like Living Stations of the Cross. If you are bothered by a lack of community in your parish (as you should be), do what you can to improve the community of your parish. Who knows, maybe you will find some like-minded individuals who want to help you with it.

      As to the concept of moving “from an hour long sermon that painstakingly picked part a sin issue and helped you learn how to deal with it or guard your heart from it to 12 to 14 minute homily,” I find that sad as well. Unfortunately, there is not too much that a lay parishioner can do about that (you know, since it’s the priest’s job to give the homily), but you can at least make the suggestion to your priest, let him know that you are interested in longer homilies. My parish is very blessed to have strong, wise, holy priests who give excellent half-hour homilies which say so very, very much, and do more than just tell: they challenge. I will try not to take them for granted.

      And if you are ever discouraged by this state of affairs, just remember: however wonderful and insightful orators a Protestant service may have, only the Catholic Mass has the True Presence of the Body, Blood, Soul, and Divinity of Christ the King.

    • http://www.facebook.com/kickintheface Jacob Timothy Michael Hughes

      I would like to say this: I’ve heard 90-minute homilies. They are terrible. They end up going in circles. I think 15-20 minutes is more than enough to teach what needs to be taught. And besides, I don’t go to mass to hear great preaching. I’d go to a Dominican for that. (Or a mass said by a Dominican, but you get the point.) I go to mass because that is where Christ is. The community, the preaching, the music: all of it means nothing compared to that.

      • Laura

        Amen! it all boils down to THAT

    • http://www.facebook.com/kickintheface Jacob Timothy Michael Hughes

      I would like to say this: I’ve heard 90-minute homilies. They are terrible. They end up going in circles. I think 15-20 minutes is more than enough to teach what needs to be taught. And besides, I don’t go to mass to hear great preaching. I’d go to a Dominican for that. (Or a mass said by a Dominican, but you get the point.) I go to mass because that is where Christ is. The community, the preaching, the music: all of it means nothing compared to that.

    • Da gal

      We are fortunate at my Catholic church to have an incredible community, and I know that it is important.
      As others have suggested, it is a fabulous idea to be the change you wish to see in the world– Or in this case, the church! Start a social group– A cheap dinner once a week? An apologetics group? A rosary making, rosary praying group? Do you have Knights of Columbus set up there, or Daughters of Isabella? Maybe get a qualified Bible study leader to visit once a week for lessons? Maybe a service group? A hospice group? Maybe a club for something out of the ordinary– A photography club, biking club, a swing dance club— which can be made Catholic by starting and ending in prayer and consecrating your work to God? Maybe an ice-cream after mass in the lobby group? Talk with your priest about starting something. You can do it! Chances are, you aren’t the only one craving some good Catholic social groups! :)
      By the way, everyone hugs at my church during the sign of peace– There’s nothing against that in the church.

  • http://www.dariasockey.blogspot.com/ Daria

    Excellent! Sort of like a litany in its rhythmn.

  • http://www.dariasockey.blogspot.com/ Daria

    Excellent! Sort of like a litany in its rhythmn.

    • Aaron Suddjian

      The audio seems like it’s been edited to sound like that, but I hope it wasn’t.

    • Aaron Suddjian

      The audio seems like it’s been edited to sound like that, but I hope it wasn’t.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=8634702 Mike Priaulx

    Cool video. I try to never, never, never read comments on blogs… but I did. So of course here I am posting a comment: I find your posts sarcastically-spirited, not mean-spirited.

    Keep up the good work. I think it was Chesterton who said, “the modern age is characterized by a sadness which calls for a new kind of prophet, not like the prophets of old who reminded people that they were going to die, but someone who would remind them that they are not dead yet. “

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=8634702 Mike Priaulx

    Cool video. I try to never, never, never read comments on blogs… but I did. So of course here I am posting a comment: I find your posts sarcastically-spirited, not mean-spirited.

    Keep up the good work. I think it was Chesterton who said, “the modern age is characterized by a sadness which calls for a new kind of prophet, not like the prophets of old who reminded people that they were going to die, but someone who would remind them that they are not dead yet. “

  • Brooklyn Mama

    Love it! Thanks so much. I NEEDED that. Today, I realized that my priest isn’t necessarily against his parishioners using birth control which is hard to swallow, especially since I practice NFP and have been defending it and the Church’s stance against the use of contraceptives.

    • grace

      God bless you. We have also felt a little disheartened by our priest’s response (or lack thereof) to this.

    • grace

      God bless you. We have also felt a little disheartened by our priest’s response (or lack thereof) to this.

  • Brooklyn Mama

    Love it! Thanks so much. I NEEDED that. Today, I realized that my priest isn’t necessarily against his parishioners using birth control which is hard to swallow, especially since I practice NFP and have been defending it and the Church’s stance against the use of contraceptives.

  • Reality_Check

    Rabbi Yeshua bar Yosef and the Catholic Church (or xtianity in general) have nothing in common, especially their teachings.

    Do you think Jesus would really have time for someone who lives in a palace?

  • Reality_Check

    Rabbi Yeshua bar Yosef and the Catholic Church (or xtianity in general) have nothing in common, especially their teachings.

    Do you think Jesus would really have time for someone who lives in a palace?

    • Tally Marx

      I have no idea what you are talking about, but if you want a reality check, here is one: Jesus is God, and God is omnipresent and omnipotent. There isn’t a single person in this world, no matter who they are or where they are at, that He doesn’t have time for.

    • Tally Marx

      I have no idea what you are talking about, but if you want a reality check, here is one: Jesus is God, and God is omnipresent and omnipotent. There isn’t a single person in this world, no matter who they are or where they are at, that He doesn’t have time for.

      • Reality_Check

        Pop quiz, who said this?

        “If you want to be perfect, go, sell your possessions and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.”

        So how bout it? When are you going to do THAT? When is the Pope?

        • CaraAlSol

          Have you thought that the pope didnt live all his life in that “Palace”?
          Have you thought that many popes had to go through hard shit and suffering? Do you know what happened to JPII and what did he do?

        • http://www.facebook.com/ronlklingler Ronald Lee Klingler

          But one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, who was later to betray him, objected, “Why wasn’t this perfume sold and the money given to the poor? It was worth a year’s wages.” He did not say this because he cared about the poor but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to what was put into it.

          “Leave her alone,” Jesus replied. “It was intended that she should save this perfume for the day of my burial. You will always have the poor among you, but you will not always have me.”

        • http://www.facebook.com/ronlklingler Ronald Lee Klingler

          But one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, who was later to betray him, objected, “Why wasn’t this perfume sold and the money given to the poor? It was worth a year’s wages.” He did not say this because he cared about the poor but because he was a thief; as keeper of the money bag, he used to help himself to what was put into it.

          “Leave her alone,” Jesus replied. “It was intended that she should save this perfume for the day of my burial. You will always have the poor among you, but you will not always have me.”

        • http://www.facebook.com/kickintheface Jacob Timothy Michael Hughes

          You DO realize that the Church is the largest charitable organization on the planet, correct?

        • http://www.facebook.com/kickintheface Jacob Timothy Michael Hughes

          You DO realize that the Church is the largest charitable organization on the planet, correct?

        • Laura

          And that the “palace” isn’t really a palace. And that all the money the church may have is not in the Pope’s private account to be spent at his will, or that the Pope doesn’t go around spending money in vacations and nice houses, or that the painitings and sculptures are free for anyone to go look at (even you “reality-check”), and that no one but the Church takes the monetary costs of that..etc Why don’t you find yourself a hobby that doesn’t involve coming in here and being annoying? seriously

        • Laura

          And that the “palace” isn’t really a palace. And that all the money the church may have is not in the Pope’s private account to be spent at his will, or that the Pope doesn’t go around spending money in vacations and nice houses, or that the painitings and sculptures are free for anyone to go look at (even you “reality-check”), and that no one but the Church takes the monetary costs of that..etc Why don’t you find yourself a hobby that doesn’t involve coming in here and being annoying? seriously

        • Katie Yankoski

          But you shouldn’t take quotes from the Bible out of context. Yes, Jesus said to sell all your possessions and follow him in order to get to heaven – but he said this AFTER the rich young man came up to him and asked what else he needed to do in order to gain eternal life. The young man had already done everything else – he was a good guy and all, following the commandments and laws – and he wanted to know what else he needed to do. Jesus challenged him with selling all his stuff and becoming one of His followers, literally one of the people who was following Him around. The passage isn’t about the fact that the young man shouldn’t be rich – it’s about becoming as perfect as you can be, challenging yourself to really draw close to Him instead of just doing what the book says and what makes you look good on paper. For some people, that is going to mean literally selling everything you have. However, that doesn’t mean having nice things is a bad thing in and of itself. The pope, as someone has already commented, does not own the things in the Vatican, and the beautiful works of art and grand cathedrals have the potential to bring us into the mystery of God in a way other things do not. Are they always needed or always used correctly? No, but that doesn’t mean they are bad. If, however, you own expensive things and they are drawing you away from God (and therefore drawing you towards the devil, as you can only be moving one direction or the other) then you should sell everything. If you are like the young rich man and are unwilling to lay down your entire life to God (in his case, all of his stuff), then you need to work on that and pray – but the thing that is hard for each of us is different, it’s not all about selling your material possessions.

        • Musiciangirl591

          when are you going to do that?

      • Reality_Check

        Pop quiz, who said this?

        “If you want to be perfect, go, sell your possessions and give to the poor, and you will have treasure in heaven. Then come, follow me.”

        So how bout it? When are you going to do THAT? When is the Pope?

    • TheRealAaron

      > Do you think Jesus would really have time for someone who lives in a palace?
      If you assume that someone living in a palace is entirely self-sufficient and never suffers or wonders or sins or experiences any of the effects of the fallen world, I guess Jesus wouldn’t see any need to make time for them.

      But if you believe that Jesus came to show the world how to love and overcome sin, then he necessarily came for all of us, because we’re all in this together.

    • TheRealAaron

      > Do you think Jesus would really have time for someone who lives in a palace?
      If you assume that someone living in a palace is entirely self-sufficient and never suffers or wonders or sins or experiences any of the effects of the fallen world, I guess Jesus wouldn’t see any need to make time for them.

      But if you believe that Jesus came to show the world how to love and overcome sin, then he necessarily came for all of us, because we’re all in this together.

      • Reality_Check

        “And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.”

        • http://www.facebook.com/ronlklingler Ronald Lee Klingler

          What good would it do for the Catholic Church to sell off all its holdings and give it all to the poor? Momentarily the poor would feel relief, but then the Church’s means of generating more wealth to give out to the poor would be gone. The Catholic Church is the single greatest charitable organization in the world. “Let your reasonableness be known to everyone”, says St. Paul; I would say it would be altogether unreasonable to insist that the Church should simply sell everything, it would cease to exist as a force for good!

        • http://www.facebook.com/ronlklingler Ronald Lee Klingler

          What good would it do for the Catholic Church to sell off all its holdings and give it all to the poor? Momentarily the poor would feel relief, but then the Church’s means of generating more wealth to give out to the poor would be gone. The Catholic Church is the single greatest charitable organization in the world. “Let your reasonableness be known to everyone”, says St. Paul; I would say it would be altogether unreasonable to insist that the Church should simply sell everything, it would cease to exist as a force for good!

        • http://thecatholicsciencegeek.blogspot.com/ The Catholic Science Geek

          “And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.”

          In the times in which this was said, the eye of a needle was a reference to a tiny door present in the walls that separated a city from the wilderness (and potential danger). At night, when the main entrances were shut off to ward off nefarious folk intending to rob or sack a city, this “eye of the needle” was opened for single travelers. Opening a tiny door as opposed to the city gates was a lot safer when it came to incoming traffic…and it required a lot less man power to guard. In order for the travelers (and camels) to go through it…they literally had to bend down on their knees to go through. Even the camels had to be lowered in order to fit through. This passage, is therefore, more a reference to humility (the bending of knees) than it is to the man’s material wealth. There are good people out there who happen to be wealthy…but there are wealthy people out there who do not happen to be good.

          In the future, please refrain from using the the scripture as a means to an end whenever you want to jump to conclusions or make biased assumptions. However, if you truly feel the need to take scripture out of context to vilify others… be aware that there are people out there that will call you out on it.

        • http://thecatholicsciencegeek.blogspot.com/ The Catholic Science Geek

          “And again I say unto you, It is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God.”

          In the times in which this was said, the eye of a needle was a reference to a tiny door present in the walls that separated a city from the wilderness (and potential danger). At night, when the main entrances were shut off to ward off nefarious folk intending to rob or sack a city, this “eye of the needle” was opened for single travelers. Opening a tiny door as opposed to the city gates was a lot safer when it came to incoming traffic…and it required a lot less man power to guard. In order for the travelers (and camels) to go through it…they literally had to bend down on their knees to go through. Even the camels had to be lowered in order to fit through. This passage, is therefore, more a reference to humility (the bending of knees) than it is to the man’s material wealth. There are good people out there who happen to be wealthy…but there are wealthy people out there who do not happen to be good.

          In the future, please refrain from using the the scripture as a means to an end whenever you want to jump to conclusions or make biased assumptions. However, if you truly feel the need to take scripture out of context to vilify others… be aware that there are people out there that will call you out on it.

          • Aaron Suddjian

            Thank you, I never knew that.

          • Aaron Suddjian

            Thank you, I never knew that.

          • Musiciangirl591

            wow, you learn a new thing everyday

        • http://indefinitecrisis.wordpress.com/ Michael H

          None of which is impossible.

    • Nate Wildermuth

      The more important question is: does someone who lives in a palace have time for Jesus? The Catholic Church rightly teaches that detachment from riches is the point that Jesus was making, not some kind of external practice. Jesus always taught that the heart mattered more than outward appearance. It matters not what you do, but what is in your heart.

      Moreover, we know that money is just metal and paper. What counts is human relationships and human communities. The secular world puts far too much faith in Mammon as a source of salvation.

      On the other hand, what is in your heart dictates what you do with your life. Your faith is demonstrated through your works. And Catholic have for too long not fully appreciated the dangers of wealth.

      So Reality_Check has a point which Catholic should not overlook: possessing riches poses a terrible temptation that should be avoided at all costs, preferably by giving away those riches to people in need. The safe path to holiness is voluntary poverty, not detached riches.

  • Mary Snustad

    Wow….I NEEDED to hear that today! Amen…Amen…I say to you!!! I have been meditating on St Faustina and Divine Mercy lately…the other day at Adoration I flipped open her diary, and in the 5 or so pages I read, Jesus told her, “Fear not, I am always with you” no less than 5 times!
    God bless you and your writing…you make learning the faith FUN, which isn’t easy to do!!! :)

  • Mary Snustad

    Wow….I NEEDED to hear that today! Amen…Amen…I say to you!!! I have been meditating on St Faustina and Divine Mercy lately…the other day at Adoration I flipped open her diary, and in the 5 or so pages I read, Jesus told her, “Fear not, I am always with you” no less than 5 times!
    God bless you and your writing…you make learning the faith FUN, which isn’t easy to do!!! :)

  • Reality_Check

    And Jesus being God was a later addition, largely by Saul (who never met Jesus, but formed the vast majority of early Xtian theology).

    There’s a big difference between Paul’s letters and the sayings of Jesus.

    • http://www.facebook.com/ronlklingler Ronald Lee Klingler

      There is indeed a ‘difference’, as there is a difference between the different gospels, but never a direct contradiction. If you know of a direct contradiction, point it out, and a discussion can ensue from there.

    • http://www.facebook.com/ronlklingler Ronald Lee Klingler

      There is indeed a ‘difference’, as there is a difference between the different gospels, but never a direct contradiction. If you know of a direct contradiction, point it out, and a discussion can ensue from there.

    • Tally Marx

      Jesus Himself said, in the Gospels, that He is God, my dear Arian friend. And if you think those verses were tampered with, prove it.

    • Tally Marx

      Jesus Himself said, in the Gospels, that He is God, my dear Arian friend. And if you think those verses were tampered with, prove it.

    • http://indefinitecrisis.wordpress.com/ Michael H

      Um, what? Dating the extant New Testament canon, Paul’s letters WERE THE EARLIEST, and the incredibly historiographical works of Luke show us that Paul most likely saw conversion around 35 AD. That is to say, awww no way, Christian theology is informed from its earliest by Jesus’ claim that he was the Son of God, and that He and the Father are One, and that the Resurrection is an historical event, not an embellishment.

      If Christ is not raised, we are not raised – and are to be pitied above all men. You need a dose of your own screen name.

    • Anonymous

      Paul may have never met Jesus, but he had a major conversion because of him. have you ever heard the story of the conversion of Paul, it’s pretty good and Paul just kinda says it like it is, he’s arrogant and a hot head, which makes the way he teaches different from the way Jesus taught

  • Reality_Check

    And Jesus being God was a later addition, largely by Saul (who never met Jesus, but formed the vast majority of early Xtian theology).

    There’s a big difference between Paul’s letters and the sayings of Jesus.

  • Caffeinatedcatholicmama

    Needed that today for sure, Marc! I’ve been downtrodden about the lack of anything from our new parish (we moved from St. Louis to So Cal.) and then you add the HHS mandate and being called “stupid and irresponsible” because we don’t use ABC…

    But it’s not my fight to win, because He’s already won it!

  • Caffeinatedcatholicmama

    Needed that today for sure, Marc! I’ve been downtrodden about the lack of anything from our new parish (we moved from St. Louis to So Cal.) and then you add the HHS mandate and being called “stupid and irresponsible” because we don’t use ABC…

    But it’s not my fight to win, because He’s already won it!

  • T K Hughes

    This preacher sounds like Monsignor Pope of the Archdiocese of Washington, DC.

  • T K Hughes

    This preacher sounds like Monsignor Pope of the Archdiocese of Washington, DC.

  • Kqueenoftheworld

    thanks , i had forgotten about this one . i now remember thinking , i should start every day watching and reciting this .

  • Kqueenoftheworld

    thanks , i had forgotten about this one . i now remember thinking , i should start every day watching and reciting this .

  • Kathy Brents

    THAT’S MY KING! (Can I get an AMEN?!)

    • Musiciangirl591

      AMEN!

  • Jellybean14me

    It’s like a Litany, or the Divine Praises!

  • Theresemisercordie

    Oh, wow…Thank you so much for posting this! I think God knew we all needed to hear this today. I, too, struggle with depression and anxiety, and this is a beautiful reminder that He is greater than all the Dark-Night-of-Helms-Deep battles we face. He is enough. His grace is enough.

  • http://universalcoolness.blogspot.com/ R.E.O. Johnson

    Ah, reading the articulate and knowledgeable comments on this post actually cheered me up more than the video; though, the video was really good.

  • http://universalcoolness.blogspot.com/ R.E.O. Johnson

    Ah, reading the articulate and knowledgeable comments on this post actually cheered me up more than the video; though, the video was really good.

  • Musiciangirl591

    i love this video :)

  • http://www.namelessministries.com/ Starbuck

    Thank you.

  • Nancy

    There’s another of this pastor’s recordings that I love — if you use the phrase “It’s Friday, but Sunday’s coming” you’ll find it. My church (I’m a Protestant) used it on Good Friday, and it was such a great reminder that we are an Easter people.

  • Rms111503

    It plays best with the sound muted.

  • LMG

    Who is the preacher?

  • Sandiep5

    Ditto Amen- He is LORD of lords and KING of Kings -He is my King and I give Him praise-Magnify His NAME- forever- A.J.

  • John Doman

    A few years back I was director of Liturgy for a Catholic parish, and we played this at Mass for Christ the King (during the Homily). Best video ever.


CLOSE | X

HIDE | X