What Do Scientologists Believe? Do They Believe in Jesus?

Do Scientologists believe in the same Jesus?  What do they believe about Jesus?  Are they Christian?  What do Scientologist believe?

Scientology’s Origination

Scientology originated by science fiction writer L. Ron Hubbard, inventor of Dianetics, a self-help system who created Scientology as a religion so this religion does not have as its Author Jesus Christ Who said He would build His church ( Matt 16:15).  Hubbard believes that people have forgotten their true nature and that they are immortal beings without knowing it and that this immortal being is trapped in a physical body. This spiritual body is called the “Thetan” (from the Greek word “theta” which means life force).  The Church of Scientology was the result of Hubbard’s work and is fully his own effort seems to contain both science and religion.  The non-denominational church has a history of expensive legal litigation in the court systems against those who have criticized it and they have been accused of aggressively harassing those who are critical of the church and condemning of their belief system.

The church believes in reincarnation and that humans have lived previously on other planets and that their “souls” have reincarnated.  There have been accusations that some members who want to know have to pay to know more about scientology, and by paying in thousands of dollars into the church they are allowed to know more of the hidden knowledge that is not revealed to members in general.  The church believes that the means of realizing their full, spiritual potential is by emphasizing self-knowledge.

Some of the greatest known names in Hollywood and in the mass media are said to be members and former members of the Church of Scientology.

Celebrity Status

Some of the greatest known names in Hollywood and in the mass media are said to be members and former members of the Church of Scientology.  Names of current or former members include; many well-known celebrities that are known as actors, comedians, directors, authors, and politicians.  Current and former members are like a veritable who’s-who but several of these former members got out of Scientology because they felt very disenfranchised and vowed to never go back.  Many former members call it the “Hotel California”, which is a song by the Eagles where there is a line that “you can check in but you can never check out.”  This is somewhat misleading because the church claims that people are free to leave but there have been some reports that former members have been harassed by the church.

The Church is Banned

In Australia, the church was actually banned in the mid-sixties because of their alleged hypnosis of members that reported that during the auditing process, according to the Anderson Report, hypnotists were placing the audited person under a positive authoritative control.  The church was forced to legally change its name to “Church of the New Faith” because of their ongoing battles with the Australian government.

The Goodness of Man?

Here is where Christianity and Scientology differ.  Scientologists believe in the goodness of man while the Bible teaches about man’s depravity.  Mankind is thought to be basically good, even though what we see in the world does not square up to this knowledge.  Humans have within them hidden powers and abilities that they can release through the enforcement and self-actualization of unwanted behaviors and by strict disciplining of the body. The scientific approach is a self-help mechanism to enable them to reach their incredible potential.  Their powers and abilities are said to be suppressed and they seek to release these forces that are supposed to be locked deep within the human spirit but are currently trapped by their physical externalities.  This religion straddles the fence between psychology and religion.

Conclusion

Scientologists believe that they may have lived thousands of times and will its members are still striving to unleash their potential but the Bible actually says that it is appointed for man to die only once and then there is a judgment (Heb 9:27).  The Word of God does not teach that we live many lives and have many rebirths in what Scientologist call reincarnations. John 14:14 answers this foolishness with Job asking a rhetorical question: “If a man dies, shall he live again? All the days of my service I would wait, till my renewal should come.”  Yes, man will live again but only once again and then will either have an eternal separation from God or be with God forever.

Scientologists disagree with what the Word of God says by their claim that there is an inherent goodness in mankind because the Bible says “The heart is deceitful above all things and desperately sick; who can understand it” (Jer 17:9)?  It doesn’t matter what a person believes, no one can call themselves a Christian unless they have repented and put their trust in Christ because what a person or religion believes doesn’t make it true.  The Word of God is sure and until we humble ourselves (James 4:6), God will not give us grace and if we do not believe in Christ and put our trust in Him after we repent and confess our sins, we have the wrath of God still abiding on us.  We have no hidden powers or abilities.  We do have sin hidden in our heart and we must have the righteousness of Christ imputed to us (2 Cor 5:21) or we’ll face a God-less eternity in suffering (Rev 20:11-15). 

Jack Wellman is Senior Writer at What Christians Want to Know whose mission is to equip, encourage, and energize Christians and to address questions about the believer’s daily walk with God and the Bible. You can follow Jack on Google Plus or check out his book Blind Chance or Intelligent Design

photo credit: kballard via photopin cc

  • DuckBenway

    “The Church of Scientology was the result of Hubbard’s work and is fully
    his own effort seems to contain both science and religion.”

    A very ambiguous statement, however, if the statement intends to claim that scientology “… seems to contain both science and religion…” could you please report on exactly where the ‘science’ is contained. Thank you.

    • Dan Courtney

      Despite that Hubbard wrapped everything he created in “science”, there is in fact virtually no evidence for anything Hubbard professed, and much of what Scientologists practice is dangerous quackery.

    • Brandon Roberts

      there is none it’s a bizzare cult

  • Dan Courtney

    So the religion that says that God sacrificed himself to himself to absolve people of the mistake that he made is saying that Scientology is a fraud? Any five year old can tell you that Scientologists are deluded cultists, but I get a smile from the pot calling the kettle black.

    • Brandon Roberts

      well what we beleive is not as farfetched it’s not really a cult since we allow members to leave at any time but your entitled to your opinion

      • Dan Courtney

        ” [Scientology] exercise[s] a kind of blackmail against persons who do not wish to continue with their sect”

        - Judge Paul G. Breckenridge, Jr., Superior Court, State of California

        So who is lying? Marc Headley spent 15 years at Scientology HQ in California, and when he escaped he was literally run off the road by Scientologists attempting to re-capture him.

        “Scientology is evil; its techniques are evil; its practice is a serious threat to the community, medically, morally, and socially; and its adherents are sadly deluded and often mentally ill”

        - Justice Anderson, Supreme Court of Victoria, Australia

        • Brandon Roberts

          yeah i know that’s not the point i was making i was saying christianity is not a cult but scientology yes that’s very much an evil cult to drain morons bank accounts

          • Dan Courtney

            Sorry for the mistake. Scientologists are tragically mistaken cult members, while Christians are just tragically mistaken.

          • Brandon Roberts

            your opinion but o.k

  • scnethics

    Ask a scientologist (like me a long time ago), and they’ll tell you that scientology doesn’t conflict with Christianity, and that one may practice scientology and Christianity at the same time. Know this: a scientologist will tell you anything to get you to do, or to keep you doing scientology. Scientologists actually believe that Christianity is an aberration, something to cure individuals (and eventually the world) of.

    The truth? Scientology isn’t a religion, a therapy, or an “applied religious philosophy” like the people who practice it think. Instead, it is a system designed to gather people and keep them under control. Simply put, it is a trap.

  • media_lush

    This article is the equivalent of saying that the Nazis had nice uniforms and did a few bad things…. sheesh dude, do some proper research…. there’s been a helluva lot of stuff been put out there in the past year… you seem to have looked at a Boys Own version from the 60′s

  • ze moo

    One cannot be a Christian and a $cientologist at the same time. In the 1993 IRS agreement, the CO$ states that they expect all $cientologists to eventually practice only $cientology. $cientology teaches that the ‘man on the cross’ was a space alien memory ‘implant’ designed to get you to sympathize with the man on the cross. Most, if not all of our ills come from similar space alien memory implants that only $cientology can cure by ‘auditing’ you.

    Such auditing costs hundreds of thousands of dollars if you go to the end of the ‘bridge’. $cientology is divided up like boy scout ranks or Free Mason degrees, those with any rank are not allowed to discuss the teachings of their current level with any one else. Few beginners are ready to swallow Xenu, the galactic overlord and his rocket ships and h-bombs, so $cientologists hide their really weird stuff for later. There is stuff that is much weirder, see South Parks ‘trapped in the closet’ for a good laugh at $cieno beliefs. It is ok to laugh, some stuff is just too crazy to not laugh at.

    $cientology has the doctrine of ‘acceptable truth’, that means they can bald faced lie to you about anything, if it benefits $cientolgy.

    Watch out for their ‘social betterment’ groups, their only job is to get more people in the door for auditing. Watch out for Applied Scholastics, The Association for Better Living (ABLE) and WISE (Worldwide Institute for $cientology Enterprises) and Narconon. Narconon is a particularly dangerous business that does drug and alcohol rehabilitation.

    Research is your friend, use it before you get involved with any group like $cientology.

  • Allison Grace

    “And God saw what He created and it was GOOD.”

    • Brandon Roberts

      are you trying to mock us or actually a christian or what

  • John W. Morehead

    For a good overview and scholarly assessment of Scientology, see J. Gordon Melton’s brief and accessible study: http://www.amazon.com/Church-Scientology-Studies-Contemporary-Religions/dp/1560851392

    • cult news

      J. Gordon Melton is known for his defense of cults and for his verbal attacks on former cult members. He is not a good source of information about cults, Scientology included: http://www.apologeticsindex.org/m06.html

      • John W. Morehead

        This is an ad hominem that does not address the quality of his scholarship in general, or the book I recommended. Melton is one of the leading scholars of new religions, and continues this work at Baylor on one of the leading faculties of religion in any Christian school. On top of that he’s a personal friend and professional colleague. And personally I question the credibility of the Apologetics Index, an evangelical countercult site run by Anton Hein, who is not a religion professional and who has no academic credentials in new religions. If we’re going to question sources of information, perhaps we should start there.

        • cult news

          Anton Hein is an evangelist. No credentials? Perhaps. I don’t think he needs them. He meets people where they are at and that includes me. He helped me get out of an abusive church and helped two friends of mine out of prostitution and another out of witchcraft. I have not met more loving ministers or Christians than him and his wife and many people I know would say the same thing.

          The Apologetics Index website includes links to articles not written by Hein. An example is this one about academic defenders of alternative religions, as published in Skeptic Magazine: http://www.apologeticsindex.org/c25.html and this one by sociologist Benjamin Beit-Hallahmi: http://www.apologeticsindex.org/c59.html

          Both articles are written by credentials academics with a particular focus on ‘new religions.’ Perhaps you have ad hominem charges for them as well?

          • John W. Morehead

            I know Anton. I worked with him in years past, and have had many opportunities to assess his work. If one is going to criticize the work of a noted scholar of new religions then one’s own validity is on the table. Hein is indeed an evangelist to “cults,” and I appreciate the help he has provided to people, but this does not mean he is a credible source on these minority religions.

            Second, your previous post was an ad hominem in that it labeled Melton a cult apologist without consideration of his work. In addition, one can speak favorably of new religions and even come to their defense without crossing a line so that one’s work on the new religions is supposedly no longer a good source of information on them.

            Finally, for another perspective on those who use the cult apologist argument to dismiss certain scholars of new religions, I recommend Doug Cowan’s book “Bearing False Witness?”, and the following essays of his for a broader consideration: http://www.cesnur.org/2002/slc/cowan.htm

            http://c.web.umkc.edu/cowande/sssr-2002.pdf

            Readers should assess Melton’s work, as well as Cowan’s essays and the work of other scholars where this label has been applied, rather than simply dismissing them because of a blog comment.

          • cult news

            Doug Cowan is hardly an impartial observer. A better book on the subject is Misunderstanding Cults: Search For Objectivity in a Controversial Field, edited by Benjamin Zablocki and Thomas Robbins. Both sides of the argument have say in it: http://www.amazon.com/Misunderstanding-Cults-Searching-Objectivity-Controversial/dp/0802081886

            I have read much though certainly not all of Melton’s works as well as books by many others on the same topic. I have tried to understand what I went through from differeent perspectives. Melton was among the least helpful as he consistently wrote like it was an advertisement for the “new religions” he was writing about.

          • John W. Morehead

            Of course, there is no such thing as an impartial observer, or objectivity as suggested i the title of the book you recommend. Everyone has biases and perspectives, and one must account for them in doing good scholarship. For a review of Zablocki and Robbins’ book see http://www.cesnur.org/2001/mi_dic03.htm.

            At any rate, Melton and Cowan’s biases do not overshadow their quality as scholars in writing accurately on new religions. One can write positively about the new religions and still disagree and offer critique when necessary, and through all of this not come across as an advertisement. I find the casual dismissal of certain scholars as cult apologists problematic, as is evident from my previous comments.

            In closing, I’ll leave it to open minded readers to assess the scholarly work of Melton and others on new religions. Thanks for the exchange.

    • scnethics

      Does Mr. Melton’s overview cover the story scientologists get to read only after a significant investment of time and money ($100,000-250,000)? At this point, scientologists learn that their bodies contain thousands of spirits of aliens, who were murdered in volcanoes on Earth some 73 million years ago. Scientologists then spend several or even tens of years (“OT Levels” three through seven) telepathically communicating with these aliens, waking them up and counseling them in one way or another, convincing them to move on to something more interesting, and stop causing the scientologist problems. Does Mr. Melton mention that after a great amount of indoctrination some scientologists are expected to spend 5 hours a day or more exorcising themselves? This seems like important information. I submit that omitting this information from a scholarly analysis would show great bias toward the scientology organization.

  • Snake Plissken

    Hubbard incorporated quite a bit of Aleister Crowley’s material in the upper levels of Scientology. And just as Crowley’s material is basically a role playing game, so is Scientology, except Scientology is designed to clean out your bank account.

  • http://atlantarofters.blogspot.com The Sanity Inspector

    Scientology is a dangerous cult of vicious swindlers. Read Lawrence Wright’s recent book on the subject, Going Clear. (And please, sea orgs, don’t poison my dog!)

  • Mark

    L. Ron Hubbard on Past Religious Leaders & Religious Tolerance:
    http://www.scientology.org/faq/scientology-beliefs/religious-figures-of-the-past.html

  • http://www.dutchamsterdam.nl/ DutchAmsterdam

    Though Scientologists claim otherwise, Scientology and Christianity are incompatible. If you take either one seriously and try to live according to either one’s teachings you soon discover that they are mutually exclusive.

    http://bit.ly/ScientologyVSChristianity

  • Anonymous

    L. Ron Hubbard taught that everyone’s religious beliefs deserve respect. In the bookThe Way to Happiness, which is not in fact a religious work but may be used by anyone, religious or not, Mr. Hubbard provided a number of practical guidelines to live by. One of the precepts in the book is “Respect the Religious Beliefs of Others.”

    “Tolerance is a good cornerstone on which to build human relationships. When one views the slaughter and suffering caused by religious intolerance down all the history of Man and into modern times, one can see that intolerance is a very non-survival activity.

    “Religious tolerance does not mean one cannot express his own beliefs. It does mean that seeking to undermine or attack the religious faith and beliefs of another has always been a short road to trouble.”

    • cult news

      The booklet “The Way To Happiness” is merely a compilation of widely agreed upon values and platitudes with very little added by Hubbard. As the saying goes, “What is good is not original, and what is original is not good.”

      It is used as a recruitment tool for Scientology:
      http://www.apologeticsindex.org/w13.html

      It is interesting to see Scientology talk about tolerance — a value Scientology it self hardly ever displays. Is Scientology’s disconnection policy an example of tolerance? http://www.apologeticsindex.org/662-scientology-disconnection

      What about ‘Fair Game’ and ‘Dead Agenting’?

      • Anonymous

        Oh okay I thought L Ron Hubbard wrote the way to happiness sorry i stand corrected.
        I am not sure who you mean when you say Scientology. The precept above seems to be telling the reader not to undermine or attack another’s beliefs and be free to say your own. Well that is what i read from this. I met a Scientologist once and told him about Jesus he did not undermine or attack me he seemed tolerant as far as i could see. Not seen him since.
        I keep hearing about this disconnection policy when Scientology is mentioned. What is this i never seen the writing? So i cannot really comment on this. Isn’t Dead Agenting something to do with proving a fact, like if someone is a thief just showing the evidence then the thief is proven to be a thief thus a Dead Agent. Comes from Espionage. I think it is mentioned in The Art of War by Sun Tzu. Fair Game no idea.

        • cult news

          The last link posted in my previous comment details Scientology’s disconnection policy. If you want to know more about it, look for ‘scientology’ and ‘disconnection’ at youtube or at tonyortega.org

          Do the same with ‘fair game’ and ‘dead agenting.’ or see the links at the apologetics index page: http://www.apologeticsindex.org/s04f.html

          • Anonymous

            Do you have a copy of the disconnection policy i not seen this?
            I will check out the other things!! Isn’t the dead agent thing based on real evidence where someone has sinned then they are a dead agent?

        • cult news

          I forgot to let you know about the scientology comparative religion page: http://www.ezlink.com/~perry/CoS/Theology/

          It will take you a while to check all the information at the various links provided but if you do you will see that scientology is incompatible with other religions.

          A lot of scientologists are ignorant regarding Scientology’s teachings because they have not yet paid enough to see the rest of the material.

  • Brandon Roberts

    look scientology is clearly a deranged cult and it’s not brainwashing it’s indoctrination through blatant lies xenu really xenu

    • Jack Wellman

      Spot on the mark Mr. Roberts. I so agree and this is accepted as the new “normal.” The “ology” part might be correct (a study) but the science is seriously skewed.

      • Brandon Roberts

        amen

  • Carl

    scientology is no more fake than Jewish derived religions like Christianity


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