What the Church Can Learn from the Reza Aslan Affair

RezaCrop

Reza Aslan has become famous for what has quickly become dubbed "Fox News' Worst Interview" about his new book Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. I agree with Robert Long's assessment at The American Conservative that the interview is motivated by bulverism, which attempts to show why a man has come to the incorrect position before demonstrating that he is incorrect. Bulverism in general accounts for a significant portion of religious reporting and indeed for any interesting subj … [Read more...]

A Utopian and an Acadian

Garden_of_eden_mosaic

I come from Colorado Springs, a conservative town.  I go to school at a liberal law school in the northeast.  As such, I get swamped with political rhetoric from the left and right, and much of it is seething. Like those around me, I often fall into the trap of partisanship. The self-congratulation that comes from condemning a political rival is delicious, but it has consequences, the worst of which is my assumption about people on the other side.  I think of them not merely as stupid and ig … [Read more...]

On Honesty and Confession

Banquo

Does a moral, psychological “point of no return” exist? Shakespeare illustrates what this turning point might look like in Act III of Macbeth. After killing his king and one of his closest friends, Macbeth, the newly crowned king, announces to his wife, I am in bloodStepped in so far that, should I wade no more,Returning were as tedious as go o’er.Strange things I have in head, that will to hand,which must be acted ere they may be scanned. After this pronouncement, he goes onto … [Read more...]

Latin in the Summer, or Learning to be Attentive

Studying

I am twenty-three years old, and I am spending my summer taking Intermediate Latin at Notre Dame.  I’m not even doing it for credit; officially, I’ve fulfilled my Master’s program’s ancient language requirements, having already taken Latin I and II.  I question my decision at times, especially when I am sitting on my back porch in the summer evenings, covered in a blanket of crumpled notes on participles and infinitives and deponent verbs and semi-deponent verbs, attempting to translate Cicero’s … [Read more...]

Short-term Missions, Long-term Places

habitat

The Gospel Coalition recently posted an article by Darren Carlson entitled “Why You Should Consider Cancelling Your Short-Term Missions Trips.” Carlson argues that many short-term mission trips are centered around making the “senders” feel good about serving—while actually failing to benefit the recipients and even sometimes causing more harm than good. He gives several concrete examples of this, such as,“houses in Latin America that have been painted 20 times by 20 different short-term teams … [Read more...]

Public Christianity and Faithful Institutional Presence

symposium

This weekend I had the privilege of gathering with a group of Fare Forward writers and readers on the (honest and truly) sublime Maryland coast to consider the subject of “Public Christianity in the 21st Century.” While the weekend’s conversations spanned topics from gender to post-modernism to Korean birthday customs, a thread that stood out to me was the concept of “institutional thinking” introduced to the group by Adam Myers, a current student at Yale Divinity School. His presentation focused … [Read more...]

Two Responses to Andy Crouch on Institutions

Hobbit_Hole

Editor's Note: As regular blog readers will have seen yesterday, a big topic at the recent Fare Forward symposium was the the Christian vocation to be faithfully present in institutions. Coincidentally, noted Christian public intellectual Andy Crouch published at the same time a piece on institutional life in Christianity today. Based on whether you like to talk about institutions or not, this timing was either something providential or a bit more sinister.  Either way, we thought it provided a g … [Read more...]


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