First The Leftovers, now The Remaining: will audiences be tired of the Rapture by the time Left Behind comes out?

Rapture, Rapture everywhere! With The Leftovers almost finished its first season on HBO, it turns out we may have another Rapture story to tide us over until the Left Behind reboot comes out October 3. A couple of trailers for a movie called The Remaining, which opens September 5, have popped up on my radar, and you can see the newer, longer one at the top of this post.

The Remaining is produced by Affirm Films, the same “faith-based” branch of Sony Pictures that had a hand in Heaven Is for Real and Moms’ Night Out. The only actor I recognize is Alexa Vega, who starred in all four Spy Kids films as well as the later Robert Rodriguez films Machete Kills and Sin City: A Dame to Kill for.

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Exodus: Gods and Kings: a few new details about the film and its soundtrack, courtesy of Première magazine

albertoiglesias-aWith Exodus: Gods and Kings due to come out in four months (and three days), it’s time for the filmmakers to put the final pieces together — and one of those pieces is the music. The French movie mag Première got to visit a recording session, where the Spanish composer Alberto Iglesias was overseeing his score for the film, and along the way the magazine reveals a few details about the film itself.

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Noah video round-up: a deleted clip, some new soundbites, and a “weather readiness” promo

vlcsnap-2014-08-08-10h01m27s29And the videos keep on coming!

Three weeks ago, five excerpts from the bonus features for Noah were released online, to coincide with the film’s release to Digital HD. The Blu-Ray itself came out last week, and with it, a few new videos.

Check ’em all out below the jump.

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Noah interview round-up: the visual-effects artists

vlcsnap-2014-08-07-21h30m54s105Noah has been out on Blu-Ray for over a week now, and new interviews with the filmmakers are popping up here and there. The Chicago Sun-Times has a new interview with Ben Snow, who oversaw the visual effects on the film, so I figured I might as well create an “interview round-up” for the visual-effects artists similar to the round-ups I’ve already created for director Darren Aronofsky, co-writer Ari Handel (updated today!) and cinematographer Matthew Libatique.

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National Geographic’s Killing Jesus now has a director

killingjesusVarious sites, including Deadline and Variety, are reporting that veteran TV director Christopher Menaul has been tapped to oversee the upcoming adaptation of Bill O’Reilly’s Killing Jesus for the National Geographic Channel. Ridley Scott is one of several producers attached to the project.

Menaul has worked almost exclusively in television, so I am unfamiliar with his work — though I do recall attending a press screening of Feast of July back in the mid-’90s. In any case, he does not seem to have worked in the Bible-movie genre before.

In March, the adaptation, written by Law & Order veteran Walon Green, was described as a four-hour miniseries. Now they’re calling it a “three-hour telepic”. Does that mean the whole thing will air on a single night?

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Exodus news round-up: a set visit, a casting controversy, and who exactly is Ben Mendelsohn playing?

2014-08-04 14.06.09The current issue of Empire magazine has a report from the set of Exodus: Gods and Kings, and while it doesn’t have all that much new information, it does include a few new pictures and a few new details.

For one thing, it confirms that the giant face we saw in the first official photo from the film is meant to be an image of Ramses II, the Pharaoh played by Joel Edgerton — and it adds the detail that this monument is part of a massive new city being built by the Hebrews called Pi-Ramses. So it looks like this film will follow the scholarly convention of equating the biblical city “Rameses”, mentioned in Exodus 1, with the historical Pi-Ramesses.

The article also mentions that the film will feature “seven — count ’em! — plagues and natural disasters”. Only seven? There are ten in the Bible, though this needn’t be an inaccuracy on the film’s part. If memory serves, The Ten Commandments (1956) really only showed three — the water turning to blood, the hailstorm and the death of the firstborn — but it alluded to the others in its dialogue. So it’s certainly possible that Exodus might show “only” seven but allow for the other three somehow.

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