Weekly Meanderings

We’ve been on Spring Break, and this is what I found this week … including a picture of Safety Harbor:
SafetyHarbo.jpg
My links aren’t as complete as usual, but I have a few, and I want to alert you to a post coming later today by Matthew Elliott about Christians and emotions. (And thanks to IVP for the ad above: click on “Likewise” and check out the offerings.)
Sad news about World Vision in Pakistan.
A good pastor, a good author, and a good blogger — moves to Beliefnet. Check out Jazz Theologian.
Speaking of good theologians and scholars, Richard Bauckham now has a website for his stuff.
Yet another great theologian, and one of my favorites: John Stott story.
Tony Jones ran a series on his paper for the Society of Pentecostal Studies: Part one and the Conclusion (you can access the rest at this site).
Derek Leman has a nice collection of links for Passover.
Mother knows best … (HT: JT)
Ted Gossard on testing by the fruit.
David Opderbeck’s post at our site drew a response from Jay Richards.
Meanderings in the News
First read this: Ignoring the news. (HT: AR)
2. If your books get soaked … what to do? Freeze them!
3. Nick Kristof’s suggestion will appeal to the younger set.
5. Victor Davis Hanson on Obama’s foreign policies.
6. Biden, Obama, and Israel“Bibi, you heard me say before, progress occurs in the Middle East when everyone knows there is simply no space between the United States and Israel,” Biden said. “There is no space between the United States and Israel when it comes to Israel’s security. And for that reason, and many others, addressing Iran’s nuclear program has been one of our administration’s priorities.” And then it happened.
7. Prostate cancer PSA testing, by the one who discovered PSA: “Even then, the test is hardly more effective than a coin toss. As I’ve been trying to make clear for many years now, P.S.A. testing can’t detect prostate cancer and, more important, it can’t distinguish between the two types of prostate cancer — the one that will kill you and the one that won’t.” And, if that wasn’t enough, Ablin closes with this: “I never dreamed that my discovery four decades ago would lead to such a profit-driven public health disaster. The medical community must confront reality and stop the inappropriate use of P.S.A. screening. Doing so would save billions of dollars and rescue millions of men from unnecessary, debilitating treatments.”
8. Robert Jenson on the loss of story.
9. Did you see this about Kansas City public schools?
Meanderings in Sports
The most notable story of the week was the UConn’s women basketball team, now with a winning streak of 72 games.  One writer thinks they’re too good, but I don’t recall that being said about Johnny Wooden’s great teams. Gino has done an incredible job finding talent and coaching the talent into a unified team. One of the greatest sports teams ever.
About Scot McKnight

Scot McKnight is a recognized authority on the New Testament, early Christianity, and the historical Jesus. McKnight, author of more than forty books, is the Professor of New Testament at Northern Seminary in Lombard, IL.

  • Mike M

    Prostate cancer in men takes a backseat to breast cancer in women, no pun intended. 27,000 men die of prostate cancer in this country each year compared to 40,000 women who die of breast cancer. Yet more than 10 times more money is spent on breast cancer research than prostate cancer. My concern: if Dr. Ablin is so concerned about the health of males in this country, does he offer an alternative approach?

  • MatthewS

    Freezing a book to dry it: never heard of that!
    Some years ago, a friend of the family gasped in horror as her her Bible went swimming in the potty, dropped there by little fingers. She sat at her table all afternoon, turning to the next page and placing a paper towel in between the pages. The owner of the little fingers escaped with no major injuries! My own Bible currently has some extra-weathered pages in Proverbs that were splashed with coffee one early morn.


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